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Doctor insights on: Gelastic Seizures

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What's a gelastic seizure?

What's a gelastic seizure?

Gelastic seizure: Gelastic seizure is a type of seizure caused by hypothalamic hamartoma, usually the patient will have sudden laughing or crying episode, it is more with laughing and it is more in males. ...Read more

Dr. William Singer
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Seizure Disorder (Definition)

Seizure disorder also known as epilepsy, is a neurological condition in which the brain's abnormal electrical activity causes muscular convulsions and altered mental states. Epilepsy is diagnosed when an individual has ...Read more


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Please tell me if there are any books specifically about gelastic(laughing) seizures?

Please tell me if there are any books specifically about gelastic(laughing) seizures?

Journal articles: There is not a good book specifically dedicated to gelastic seizures, but this book may be helpful to you: Seizures and Epilepsy in Childhood: A Guide (Johns Hopkins Press Health Book) by John Freeman and colleagues. There are many good journal articles on this topic, here are a couple well-cited ones: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8353707 and http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8469334 ...Read more

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What are the most common causes of sleep onset seizures in the mid 30's?

Several: Based upon the age of insert, they would almost certainly be partial insert seizures (aka "localization related"). At least half the time, no clear reason is uncovered for them starting. Other causes include prior trauma, abnormal tangles of blood vessels stuck in the brain, "birthmarks" on the brain in a localized area, among others. Brain tumor is possible, but less common. ...Read more

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What is a seizure?

What is a seizure?

Neuron discharge: Seizures are of many types and result from incoordinated neuron discharges. They can be focal without loss of consciousness or more severe with loss of consciousness as well as uncontrolled motor movements. ...Read more

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What cause a seizures?

What cause a seizures?

Seizure causes: There are around 200, 000 new seizures and epilepsy cases each year, and a cause is only identified in about 30% of those cases. The most common causes include stroke, brain tumors, head injuries, genetic conditions, infections, abnormal sodium or blood sugar levels, etc. Certain factors known to provoke seizures include missing medication doses, alcohol/drugs, sleep deprivation and stress. ...Read more

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Can a seizure be cured?

Can a seizure be cured?

Potentially: Epileptic seizures can only be cured if a neurosurgeon could remove the area causing the seizures. Otherwise, seizures can be managed with medication, vagus nerve stimulator, or avoidance to stimulants that trigger seizures such as flickering lights or other causes of sensory stimulated seizures ...Read more

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What are silent seizures?

What are silent seizures?

No clinical seizure: Pt. Does not show clinical seizure but neurophysiological testing like eeg will show seizure discharges. ...Read more

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What are atonic seizures?

What are atonic seizures?

Loss of tone: Some complex epileptic have drop attacks=fall to the floor because of loss of muscle tone in legs usually have other seizures like tonic= totally stiff or starring spells in same child--or myoclonic seizures like simple jerks of trunk or limb. ...Read more

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What are partial seizures?

What are partial seizures?

Only part of brain: At least at onset these seizures affect only part of the brain. Typically one remains awake - unless generalized to the other hemisphere or occasionally with complex partial seizures. Often confused with panic disorder, migraine headaches, dissociation, amnesia, schizophrenia, bipolar affective disorder, and medication/elicit drug reactions. ...Read more

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What exactly is a seizure?

What is a seizure: A seizure is a clinical condition caused by electrical excitation over a part of (or all of) the surface of the brain. It may cause loss of awareness, loss of consciousness, breath holding, muscle movements, twitching, or vocalization, among other things. ...Read more