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Doctor insights on: Full Term Stop Labor

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Is 36 weeks considered full term? -- and why don't you stop labor after 36 weeks?

Is 36 weeks considered full term? -- and why don't you stop labor after 36 weeks?

37 weejs: 37 weeks is consiidered fullterm. We don't stop labor after 35 to 36 weeks because the risks of the medications can outweigh the risks of prematurity. ...Read more

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Full Term (Definition)

Full term is a condition in which a baby is delivered after reaching 37 weeks' gestation. Full term babies are presumed to be normal, compared with premature babies who can suffer from cerebral palsy, blindness, deafness, developmental problems, learning disabilities, severe lung diseases, infection and loss of some intestines, etc..., depending on ...Read more


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What are some ways to make your self go into labor at full term?

Sex, bouncing.: Vaginal intercourse at term can trigger labor from cervical stimulation and prostaglandin in ejaculate. Bouncing on large midwife balls is also supposed to help you go into labor, although not scientifically proven. ...Read more

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What should I do if I think I am going into labor before I am full-term?

Call: Urgency will depend on how far along you are. Before 34 completed weeks your doctor will want to try to stop labor or prolong pregnancy long enough to mature the babies lungs and prevent infections to give your baby the best chance. ...Read more

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I've been told they will induce labor no longer then 2 weeks following full term . Is this true? If wait longer than 2 wk , won't be able to b there

Depends: When and how elective inductions are done is a hotly debated topic among Ob/Gyns. Most practices won't induce someone in their first pregnancy until at least 40 weeks. In subsequent pregnancies, induction can be as early as 39 weeks (hot debate) Elective inductions should not be done prior to 39 weeks. Whenever it is done, the cervix must be "ripe"--ready to dilate or it won't work. ...Read more

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I'm 2 CM dilated, 50% effaced and baby is at -1 station. This is my 2nd baby, first full term one. What is a good guesstimate on when labor will start?

I'm 2 CM dilated, 50% effaced and baby is at -1 station. This is my 2nd baby, first full term one. What is a good guesstimate on when labor will start?

Hard to predict: Many women can stay at 2cm/50% /-1 for several weeks. Others will go into labor quickly. It's a great sign to have such a nice "bishop score". It means that chances of success for a speedy vaginal delivery are increased when baby finally decides it's time. ...Read more

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Can red raspberry leaf tea prevent you from going into labor when you are full term?

Can red raspberry leaf tea prevent you from going into labor when you are full term?

No: Nobody knows what makes women go into labor. Something happens and there are changes the levels of certain hormones, such as decreasing Progesterone and increasing oxytocin, and then contractions start. There is no natural way to prevent going into labor at term, because humans are not suppose to stop labor when the baby is due to come out. ...Read more

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I have a weak cervix what are the chances i can have a baby full term, i had a preterm labor at 21 weeks and lost my son?

I have a weak cervix what are the chances i can have a baby full term, i had a preterm labor at 21 weeks and lost my son?

Obstetrician: You need to be followed closely by your obstetrician and consideration for a suture placed to try and keep your cervix closed, a cervical cerclage. All the best and I hope this works for you. ...Read more

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My 10 week old has a hemangioma on her left arm, and is increasing in size. She was full term. Is there anything to stop it from getting larger?

My 10 week old has a hemangioma on her left arm, and is increasing in size. She was full term. Is there anything to stop it from getting larger?

Please see below.: Hemangiomas are fairly common, occurring in up to 10% of full-term babies by 1 year old, especially females. Most of the time they don't cause any complications, so no treatment is needed. Initially they grow very quickly, but after 4-6 months, growth slows, then stops. They then start slowly shrinking; most resolve by age 9. ...Read more

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