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Doctor insights on: Foods To Eat With Hemochromatosis

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 is there a special diet I should eat or foods I should avoid for hemochromatosis?

 is there a special diet I should eat or foods I should avoid for hemochromatosis?

Certainly: Red meats are known for iron content in them, so avoid those, avoid foods high in vitamin c, as it increases iron absorption. Foods high in sugar should be avoided, as it increases iron absorption. Avoid raw shellfish.Alcohol in moderation, better off - none. Should eat - nuts, veggies, grains, rice, beans. Coffee and tea are fine if not consumed in excessive amounts. ...Read more

Dr. (Liz)Phuong Tran
320 Doctors shared insights

Hemochromatosis (Definition)

A medical condition caused by iron accumulation in the body. It can be the result of underlying hereditary disease or be due ...Read more


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What foods are recommended for someone with hemochromatosis?

What foods are recommended for someone with hemochromatosis?

What you like: If you are monitoring your serum ferritin and getting phlebotomy as needed, go ahead and enjoy that big, juicy, iron-rich steak. If you have one of the rare hemochromatosis variants for which phlebotomy is futile, then you need to get with a specialist dietician. ...Read more

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What food do I avoid if I havebeen diagnosed with hemochromatosis?

What food do I avoid if I havebeen diagnosed with hemochromatosis?

Just get treated: Once the phlebotomies have begun, you have my permission to eat what you wish. ...Read more

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Which dr sees hemochromatosis?

Which dr sees hemochromatosis?

Any: Any competent primary care physician can diagnose and arrange for treatment hemochromatosis. You may get sent to the gastroenterologist, cardiologist, endocrinologist and geneticist. The key is that if this is common hemochromatosis, you have the serious disease out of all of them that's easiest to manage effectively. ...Read more

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Can I get cure with hemochromatosis?

No: But mainstay of treatment is therapeutic phlebotomy. ...Read more

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Why do people develop hemochromatosis?

Why do people develop hemochromatosis?

It's in the genes: In hereditary (= inherited from parents) hemochromatosis, too much iron is absorbed by the gut & deposits in tissues. Liver, heart, other damage can result. It is autosomal recessive: both parents must carry the gene & not all offspring will be affected. Secondary (= due to other causes) hemochromatosis can occur with certain types of hemolytic anemia (red blood cells bursting, releasing iron). ...Read more

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Do a lot of people get hemochromatosis?

It's relatively rare: Hemochromatosis is a disorder where a person has too much iron in the blood. This can cause significant problems as iron will deposit in areas like the hear and liver. While it is typically rare, it can be seen if someone takes too much iron supplement. Generally, men should not take iron if they are otherwise healthy. Women, on the other hand, are usually ok provided they are still mentruati. ...Read more

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What are the symptoms of hemochromatosis?

Varies: Many times, it is only presented with high iron saturation and or iron storage without having any symptoms.
However, the clinical manifestations of iron accumulation can include liver disease, elevation of liver enzymes, skin pigmentation, diabetes mellitus, arthropathy, impotence in males, and cardiac enlargement with or without heart failure or conduction defects etc. ...Read more

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What happens when you have hemochromatosis?

Easy Rx: The key is that you got diagnosed, hopefully early. 1 person in 200 will be symptomatic with this. I'm going to assume the diagnosis is correct & it's common hemochromatosis. You'll have a pint of blood drained maybe 2x/week until you feel better / labs turn good. The blahs, thumb pain, lackluster love life, and whatever else will improve. Untreated, it kills you, treated you do great. ...Read more

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What is the impact of hemochromatosis on you?

What is the impact of hemochromatosis on you?

Death if untreated: Thankfully, if it's picked up early, you're spared decades of ill-health and ultimately death from involvement of the heart, liver, and/or endocrine pancreas. Of all the really nasty common diseases, hemochromatosis is the easiest to treat, by blood-bank-style donations. ...Read more

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Could I go into the army with hemochromatosis?

Could I go into the army with hemochromatosis?

No: AR 40-501 Ch 2-e (5) "current or history of metabolic liver disease, including but not limited to hemochromatosis..." No chance of a waiver for that one. ...Read more

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My friend has a hemochromatosis? What is that?

Excess iron: Some people have a hereditary condition leading to excessive iron accumulation in the body. Excess iron is toxic. It is easily treatable. See this site for more info.
http://www. Mayoclinic. Org/diseases-conditions/hemochromatosis/basics/definition/con-20023606 ...Read more

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What are the symptoms of having hemochromatosis?

Subtle: Simply feeling unwell. Arthritis worst at the base of the thumb is said to be quite suggestive. Erectile dysfunction in a man. When the symptoms become obvious, the damage is already massive. ...Read more

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What are some of the symptoms of hemochromatosis?

A few: Lack of energy, abdominal pain, memory fog, loss of sex drive, heart flutters, irregular heart beat. When symptoms are associated with hemochromatosis, these usually begin in men in their late 20’s to early 30’s. In women, symptoms usually start about 10-15 years after they stop having a period due to menopause, birth control pills or hysterectomy. ...Read more

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Could you explain what is hemochromatosis illness?

Iron overload: This is a genetic tendency to absorb iron too readily through the gut, overloading and damaging the organs. Of all the common, deadly diseases that disable and kill young adults, this is by far the easiest to manage by removing blood and thus iron. Consider yourself fortunate. Secondary hemochromatosis is due to repeated transfusions and is more difficult to care for. Glad you're diagnosed. ...Read more

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Does anyone know some facts about hemochromatosis?

Does anyone know some facts about hemochromatosis?

Common & easy: In the common form, the gut absorbs iron too well -- something of a plus, but too much iron will ruin the liver, pancreas, adrenals, heart, sex drive, and joints (base of thumb especially) and turn you gray. Easy to test for by labs, and easy to treat by draining a pint or two of blood every week. Maybe one person in 200 has the genes to get it, and some still get missed. ...Read more

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Hemochromatosis. How do you get hemochromatosis?

Inherited: Inherited disorder of any one of a number of genes that are involved in iron transport and storage. The vast majority of hemochromatosis is type! A point mutation in the hfe gene, (c282y) on the short arm of chromosome 6. ...Read more

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I want to know what's the impact of hemochromatosis?

Get treated or die: It's as simple as that. Common hereditary hemochromatosis is by far the easiest to manage of all the common, deadly diseases of young people. It announces itself as elevated liver enzymes, impotence, an odd skin color, sore joints at the base of the thumbs, glucose intolerance, or whatever. Accept therapeutic phlebotomy and you'll feel much better. If it's missed or neglected, it's deadly. Period. ...Read more

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How can the body change when you have hemochromatosis?

Variable signs and: Symptoms. Bronze skin coloration may be the only outward sign. Other changes depend on the organs affected, e.g., liver, heart, pancreas and endocrine organs. See this site for more info.
http://www. Mayoclinic. Com/health/hemochromatosis/ds00455. ...Read more

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What do you suggest if my friend has a hemochromatosis?

Blood letting: Hemochromatosis can be easily managed by periodic removal of blood to drain the body of excess iron. This is about the only disease where the old practice of blood letting actually works. ...Read more

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What is the definition or description of: Hemochromatosis?

Hemochromatosis: Genetic metabolic disorder of the utilization of iron and can lead to tissue Fe deposits which can have serious side effects to those organs, especially the liver. ...Read more

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Is being diagnosed with hemochromatosis at age 20 abnormal?

Is being diagnosed with hemochromatosis at age 20 abnormal?

No: In fact, I urge my medical students to screen everybody for hemochromatosis as young adults. Congratulations on being diagnosed -- you've been spared years of "the blahs", and ultimately a nasty death around age 40-60 from liver disease ("you must be a drunk! "), a heart rhythm problem, and/or diabetes. The phlebotomy treatment is a piece of cake compared to what's requirqed for other grave disease. ...Read more

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Is hemochromatosis considered dominant or considered recessive?

Is hemochromatosis considered dominant or considered recessive?

Recessive (sort of): The common genetic defect in the hfe gene for phenotypic hemochromatosis is the c282y/c282y homozygous. However other defects other than c282y can lead to hemochromatosis. C282y heterozgyotes with hhc are though to posses another unclassified defect. ...Read more

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Which is the impact of hemochromatosis on the individual, family and society?

Homework question: An individual with hemochromatosis dies in middle age unless diagnosed and treated. Treatment is extremely easy compared with the other common killers and leads to a healthy life. Sufferers are often accused of being alcoholics in denial if their physicians are unaware of hemochromatosis. I hope you can flesh this out for class. Noncompliance and ignorance kill. ...Read more

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No one in my family has ever been diagnosed with hemochromatosis or had any of the symptoms; how could I possibly have this disease?

No one in my family has ever been diagnosed with hemochromatosis or had any of the symptoms; how could I possibly have this disease?

Recessive genetics: Hereditary hemochromatosis is a recessive genetic disease - you have to inherit two mutations, one in each of your two hfe genes, to develop this condition. Your parents would be carriers but completely unaffected. What's more, only 10-15% of folks with two mutations ever get sick. The american hemochromatosis society (http://www. Americanhs. Org/) has more information. ...Read more

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Are hemochromatosis and diabetes linked?

Are hemochromatosis and diabetes linked?

Very much so: Untreated hemochromatosis ("bronze diabetes") will often cause diabetes that will self-cure when the hemochromatosis is treated. ...Read more

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Can hemochromatosis kill you?

Yes: Untreated, it's lethal. If it's unrecognized, your elevated liver enzymes may lead to your being accused of being a secret problem drinker. You'll lose your sexuality, develop arthritis, and eventually turn yellow, bloat up, and die over several years. It's not pleasant. If you are diagnosed with hemochromatosis, be aware that it's the easiest of all the killers to keep under control. ...Read more

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Is the blood dark in hemochromatosis?

No: The color is normal. Brown blood usually means methemoglobin. ...Read more

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Does stress make hemochromatosis worse?

Does stress make hemochromatosis worse?

Maybe: I see that you have this fairly common illness and I hope that you have having it managed scientifically. Physical and emotional stress are rough on the secondary diabetes that often results from hemochromatosis. If there is stress in your life, I hope it is what Selye called "eu-stress" to help you achieve & learn, and that you'll cope with "dis-tress" proactively. Best wishes. ...Read more

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Help docs! My friend has a hemochromatosis?

Glad it's diagnosed: Of all the common, dread diseases, this one is the easiest to manage. I'm going to assume this is primary hemochromatosis not secondary to transfusion for some other lifetime illness. Your friend will be treated with regular phlebotomy and will start feeling a whole lot better in a short time. ...Read more