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Doctor insights on: Febrile Seizures And Autism

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Are febrile seizures considered brain injury?

Are febrile seizures considered brain injury?

Not usually: These are not entirely uncommon before age 5 when the brain is not very mature and has less ability to suppress excess electrical activity inside the brain. The further it is after that age, it is much more important to bring this to medical or neurological attention. A few early febrile seizures before age 5 usually would not be associated with any significant brain injury or findings. ...Read more

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Dr. Manoj Mittal
78 doctors shared insights

Febrile Convulsions (Definition)

Febrile convulsions are seizures (fits or convulsions) occurring in children aged 6 months to 5 years, associated with fever, without other underlying cause such as CNS infection or electrolyte imbalance. The mechanisms are unknown. It is uncertain whether the degree of fever or the rate of rise of temperature is a trigger ...Read more


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Febrile seizures in an adult patient. I thought only little kids have febrile seizures.?

Febrile seizures in an adult patient. I thought only little kids have febrile seizures.?

Fever as stress: Fever/illness/lack of sleep etc., all stress factors can set off a seizure in one prone to seizures. To call the adult event a "febrile seizure" is a misuse of a term limited by convention to a benign childhood condition. A more accepted term would be a seizure associated with fever and its long term prognosis would be much different.. ...Read more

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Do petit mal seizures lower a child's i.Q.?

Do petit mal seizures lower a child's i.Q.?

If untreated: Untreated petit mal will impair learning due to priods of non responsiveness. ...Read more

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Is monoclonal epilepsy, tonic clonic seizure, tonic seizure and clonic seizure are the same ( grand mal)?

Is monoclonal epilepsy, tonic clonic seizure, tonic seizure and clonic seizure are the same ( grand mal)?

No: Juvenile moloclonal epilepsy is a generalized epilepsy, which occurs in the age group from 12-16yo. Grand mal seizures are usually generalized type of seizures and has two phases. In the tonic phase, loss of conciousness occurs and muscle contraction causes the person to fall down. The clonic phase is the rhythmic contraction of muscles, alternating b/w flexion and relaxation. Thanks. ...Read more

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Hi,I have petit mal.does atypical absences seizures causes learning difficulties.

Yes: Having frequent absence seizures can interfere with being aware of what is being taught and interfere with learning ...Read more

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Do grand mal seizures cause brain damage in children?

Do grand mal seizures cause brain damage in children?

Seizure: A seizure may already be due to an underlying brain condition. On the other hand uncontrolled seizure can cause brain damage as well. ...Read more

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Dr. Jay Park Dr. Park
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How dangerous are febrile seizures?

Dr. Jay Park Dr. Park
1 doctor agreed:

Scary but not...: With rare exception, most of febrile seizures are not dangerous. Almost all children outgrows once they reach 6 years of age. ...Read more

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Can child with history of febrile seizures present with symptoms of adhd?

Can child with history of febrile seizures present with symptoms of adhd?

Yes. ADHD and : seizures can overlap in symptoms but are usually considered to be co-morbid;that is,can co-exist at the same time. A psychiatrist can help in these areas. ...Read more

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What are absence and petit mal seizures?

Petit mal Sz.: Petit mal seizure is an old term for absence seizure. There is interruption of consciousness where the person becomes unresponsive for up to half a minute, sometimes with slight muscle twitching. ...Read more

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How are febrile seizures treated?

How are febrile seizures treated?

Treat the fever: Febrile seizures rarely are dangerous to the child if managed well. More risk is the illness and the child's overall health. Medication can be given at onset to stop the seizure. Daily medication is no longer recommended. ...Read more

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My son has cerebral palsy, autism, mental retardation, catatonic schizophrenia, seizures, & no lower left lope of brain what is his life expectancy?

Who knows!: So sorry about your son. All of his conditions you could think might cause a shorter life span for all sorts of reasons, but with good care one never knows. Accidents, poor nutrition ( because he doesn't eat well), progressive brain deterioration if repeated seizures, infections, general stress with its harmful physical effects, all could contribute to premature death. Best of luck! ...Read more

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Are cerebral palsy and epilepsy related?

Are cerebral palsy and epilepsy related?

Yes: Epilepsy refers to a seizure disorder. Children with CP have a static brain injury. This can result in some cases in abnormal bursts of activity (seizures). Not every child w CP has seizures but certainly more than the general population. ...Read more

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Is palilalia more often related to tourette's or autism spectrum? My child has asd and multiple motor tics started palilalia 6+ months ago.

Is palilalia more often related to tourette's or autism spectrum?  My child has asd and multiple motor tics started palilalia 6+ months ago.

Statistics unavailab: Palilalia can occur in both. Reports would implicate tourette's as most common, but it has been reported in autism and asperger's. Formal comparative incidence studies appear to be unavailable at this time. Perhaps one of my colleagues in research will comment further. ...Read more

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What is the difference between Epilepsy with Grand Mal Seizures on Awakening and Juveinile Myoclonic Epilepsy?

What is the difference between Epilepsy with Grand Mal Seizures on Awakening and Juveinile Myoclonic Epilepsy?

Different names for: These are different names for Seizures(doctors call it Epilepsy, if the condition is persistent). You should be checked by a neurologist, unless already done. ...Read more

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3 months baby having grand mal seizures.EEG good,MRI as well.Talking keppra (levetiracetam) 2*1.5ml and phenob.2*15mg and still has seizures almost daily.Reason?

3 months baby having grand mal seizures.EEG good,MRI as well.Talking keppra (levetiracetam) 2*1.5ml and phenob.2*15mg and still has seizures almost daily.Reason?

Consult neurologist: Consult your treating neurologist , inform him that baby is still having seizures .Your baby may need higher dose of medicines ,either increase in dosage or add other anti-seizure drug .The seizure should be controlled at the earliest possible ...Read more

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Supraventicilar tachycardia and violent seizure with fever?

Supraventicilar tachycardia and violent seizure with fever?

Fever complications: I think what you're asking is if supraventricular tachycardia and/or seizures can occur with fevers? Both can occur if the fever is high enough, especially in children. ...Read more

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Are tonic clonic seizures only a symptom of epilepsy?

Are tonic clonic seizures only a symptom of epilepsy?

Epilepsy: is by definition recurrent unprovoked seizures. Recurrent provoked seizures are seen on occasion (for example the alcoholic who uses up his SSI monthly stipend who presents to the ER with alcohol withdrawal seizures on the 29th of the month) GTC seizures can occur for many reasons (taking too much Ultram, caffeine, cocaine, hypomagnesemia, hyponatremia, hypocalcemia, withdrawal from Benzodiazepine ...Read more

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How do hypoglycemic seizures differ from epileptic seizures in adults in appearance?

How do hypoglycemic seizures differ from epileptic seizures in adults in appearance?

Seizures: There is no difference in the appearance of these seizures. Most are all Tonic/clonic type seizures. THe cause and treatments of the two types differs. Hope this helps ...Read more

Dr. Johanna Fricke
532 doctors shared insights

Autism Spectrum Disorder (Definition)

ASD are a spectrum of disorders of varying degrees that are characterized by difficulties in social interaction, verbal and nonverbal communication and repetitive behaviors. Autism statistics from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) identify around 1 in 68 American children as ...Read more


Dr. Johanna Fricke
643 doctors shared insights

Autism (Definition)

A neurodevelopmental disorder affecting three areas: abnormal socialization, communication, and restricted interests with repetitive patterns of behavior. It is usually detected in the first two years of life. Cause is unknown but strong evidence points to an interplay between ...Read more