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Doctor insights on: Familial Nonpolyposis Colon Cancer

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If a colon needs to be removed because of colon cancer are their alternatives to a external bag?

If a colon needs to be removed because of colon cancer are their alternatives to a external bag?

Bag is rarely needed: Colostomy( external bag ) is rarely needed for elective cancer surgery. It is more frequently used if the cancer is located very close to the anus, Also, a temporary colostomy may be used for emergency surgery when cancer is obstructing colon completely and the bowel cannot be cleaned prior to the surgery. ...Read more

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Dr. Eric Kaplan
910 doctors shared insights

Colon Cancer (Definition)

Final few yards of your intestine, between the terminal ileum (small bowell) and rectum. It squeezes water and solidifies waste to stool. It is subject to outpouching (divertics) polyps, and these can become cancers. The cells are abnormal, invade into the muscle and travel ...Read more


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What gene do I need to get tested for the familial colon cancer?

What gene do I need to get tested for the familial colon cancer?

Need more info: Totally different genes predispose to colon cancer, including BRCA 1 and 2; Familial Adenomatous Polyposis develops so many polyps in the colon they may be too numerous to count--but this one is quite rare. The commonest is Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colon Cancer. You may be at increased risk if close family members have developed it. See http://www.hopkinscoloncancercenter.org/CMS/CMS_Page.aspx? ...Read more

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Life expectancy of colon cancer==similar to parent if familial?

Life expectancy of colon cancer==similar to parent if familial?

Yes and no: If you a have a true familial form (generally this means multiple 1 st degree relatives have it. Usually happens at an earlier age) then yes the course of disease is similiar. If by familial you mean 1 relative had it, then no it is variable and progress differently. ...Read more

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Is it still possible for me to have familial adenomatous polyposis if parent had colon cancer?

Is it still possible for me to have familial adenomatous polyposis if parent had colon cancer?

Yes if parent has it: Yes if parent had colon cancer due to familial adenomatous polyposis, you could have inherited, only way to rule out is to see your physician , and have a colonascopy done. ...Read more

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How rare would it be that a person in his 20's would have colon cancer?

How rare would it be that a person in his 20's would have colon cancer?

Quite rare; not zero: Colorectal cancers in young adults are most often due to a genetic problem like hnpcc (hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer) or fap (familial polyposis coli). Cr cancers can also be seen in young adults with inflammatory bowel disease, although it is rare. Any young adult with symptoms that don't respond to treatment should seek further evaluation. ...Read more

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Question about hereditary colon cancer: which kinds are inherited or run in families?

Question about hereditary colon cancer: which kinds are inherited or run in families?

Several.: The types of colorectal cancers you refer to include hnpcc (hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer) and fap (familial adenomatous polyposis). However, each of these can also arise form a new mutation with no family history. Garden variety colorectal cancer also has some heritability, though far less than those noted above. ...Read more

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Is colon cancer genetic?

Is colon cancer genetic?

Sometimes: Some colon cancers are related to specific genetic mutations but the majority are not. ...Read more

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What are the odds of a 19 year old getting colon cancer?

What are the odds of a 19 year old getting colon cancer?

It happens...: Teens and young adults do get colon cancer, but over 90% of all cases occur in adults over 50 years of age. ...Read more

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Some of my Aunts had HNPCC 1 died colon cancer@ 34. I have no cancer yet and am 43 am I or my kids still @ higher risk of colon cancer?

Some of my Aunts had HNPCC 1 died colon cancer@ 34. I have no cancer yet and am 43 am I or my kids still @ higher risk of colon cancer?

Yes: With hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer or Lynch syndrome there is an autosomal dominant genetic condition associated with a high risk of colon cancer as well as other cancers including endometrial cancer ovary, stomach, small intestine, This is due to inherited mutations that impair DNA mismatch repair. Absence of malignancy now can result in cancers appearing later. ...Read more

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Dr. Mark Ingerman
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Colon (Definition)

The colon is another term for the large intestine. This is the final portion of the digestive system, responsible for absorbing water and storing stool before evacuation. It is divided into sections described as cecum; ascending, transverse, descending and ...Read more


Dr. Barry Rosen
4,121 doctors shared insights

Cancer (Definition)

An uncontrolled cell growth leading to invasion and metastases is what cancer is defined as. It produced abnormal growth of cells which acquire destructive properties causing serious threat to host's life, unless it can be removed or destroyed by ...Read more