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Doctor insights on: End Stage Colorectal Cancer Symptoms

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What are the signs and symptoms of colorectal cancer?

What are the signs and symptoms of colorectal cancer?

None: Usually there are no symptoms. Later can develop intestinal or rectal bleeding, anemia, weight loss, intestinal blockage, change in bowel movements, etc. ...Read more

Dr. Herbert Hoover
236 Doctors shared insights

Colorectal Cancer (Definition)

Colorectal cancer is cancer of the colon or rectum. The cells lining the colon or rectum become abnormal and grow uncontrollably. They start as polyps. Symptoms include blood in the stool, constipation, loss of appetite, and weight loss. This cancer can be prevented through early screening, if a polyp is detected during a colonoscopy and excised. Additionally, a high fiber diet with plenty of water and a ...Read more


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What are the symptoms of colorectal cancer?

What are the symptoms of colorectal cancer?

Varied: Lesions of the right colon hard to dx early since bowel content is liquified. On left side, content is solid and if lesion present, obstruction occurs if lesion circumferential or bleeding noted from irritation of hard stool against lesion. On rt. As well as left side ideal time to define is before symptoms by routine colonoscopy ...Read more

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What are early symptoms of colorectal cancer?

What are early symptoms of colorectal cancer?

May be none: Many early cancers do not have any symptoms and that is why it is important to have screening tests done, e.g., colonoscopy at age 50 for prevention of colo-rectal cancer. Symptoms may be change in bowel habits, bleeding per rectum, anemia, bowel obstruction and the first symptoms may be from metastases to other organs such as liver. ...Read more

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What are common symptoms of colorectal cancer?

What are common symptoms of colorectal cancer?

Blockage, Bleeding: The most common symptoms associated with colon cancer include (cramping) abdominal pain, a change in bowel habits ("pencil-thin stools"), bloody bowel movements, weakness/fatigue, and/or weight loss. The goal, of course, is to diagnose colon cancers before symptoms develop; I advise colonoscopy at age 50, or earlier if there is a family history. ...Read more

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What are common early symptoms of colorectal cancer?

What are common early symptoms of colorectal cancer?

Often "silent": Unfortunately, colon cancers may develop "under the radar" for quite some time before symptoms occur. The earliest sign is usually anemia caused by a slowly bleeding tumor. As the cancer grows, it may block the colon causing cramping pain, bloating, and/or pencil-thin stools. The gold standard for diagnosing colorectal cancer is screening colonoscopy at age 50, or earlier with a family history. ...Read more

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I am 16 years old. I'm very afraid I may have colorectal cancer or ovarian cancer. My symptoms are very similar. Is it too late to treat either?

I am 16 years old. I'm very afraid I may have colorectal cancer or ovarian cancer. My symptoms are very similar. Is it too late to treat either?

Cancer: There are many things that cause diarrhea, pain, and bloating. Particularly at your age, cancer would not be a top consideration, it would be pretty far down on the list. Don't speculate on the worst possible case scenario. See your doctor, he/she will help sort it out. ...Read more

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I am 23 male. I had symptoms of hemorroid for one year. I fear it be colorectal cancer as my stool is thin but not much may it be?

I am 23 male. I had symptoms of hemorroid for one year. I fear it be colorectal cancer as my stool is thin but not much may it be?

See colorectal doc: Best way to identify the problem at hand is visiting a colorectal surgeon who can examine the area and advise you accordingly. ...Read more

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How probable would colorectal cancer be at 22 with no family history or risk factors. I always have a fear of cancers and make up symptoms in my head.

Low risk: The risk of colorectal cancer for a 22 year old person with no family history is low. Typical symptoms which would warrant investigation include rectal bleeding and a persistent change in bowel habits. Routine screening colonoscopy should begin around age 50. ...Read more

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Mom is 52. Smokes 2-3 cigs a day. Does she need to get screening colonoscopy even without symptoms? What are chances of colorectal cancer?

Mom is 52. Smokes 2-3 cigs a day. Does she need to get screening colonoscopy even without symptoms? What are chances of colorectal cancer?

Needs colonoscopy: Studies have shown that all normal-risk individuals should have a screening colonoscopy starting at age 50 and repeated at least every 10 years if no polyps are found. All polyps should be removed. If there is a positive family history for colon cancer, screening should start at an earlier age. There is about a 5% lifetime risk of developing colon cancer. ...Read more

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10cm sigmoid tumor obstructing bowel, terminal colorectal cancer since 2010 extensive disease. Choice is stent or stoma please help not sure what to do?

10cm sigmoid tumor obstructing bowel, terminal colorectal cancer since 2010 extensive disease. Choice is stent or stoma please help not sure what to do?

Sorry: Sorry about the bad diagnosis. I would suggest that, at this point, if stent is possible go that route. A lot easier to recover from and ultimately, if disease is as bad as you say, it will be the same outcome. But don't have to recover from a big operation. ...Read more

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I'm 30.Afraid of colorectal cancer due to rectal bleeding+other symptoms. Can PCP order virtual colonoscopy or must I visit gastro? Is virtual good?

I'm 30.Afraid of colorectal cancer due to rectal bleeding+other symptoms. Can PCP order virtual colonoscopy or must I visit gastro? Is virtual good?

Colonoscopy: Virtual colonoscopy has value but w/the symptoms you mention you need a real one, which will yield more information. Your PCP can refer you to a gastro, which is the type of doc you would be best served by. Peace and good health. ...Read more

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I have a recurrent colorectal cancer. Just finished with chemorad. Waiting to go for surgery however doctor mentioned stenting uterus during surgery.

Stenting ureter!: I think you mean stenting ureter, not uterus!
ureter will be stented in cancer operation to avoid any injuries to the ureters.
during cancer operation they do a lymph node dissection and they stay wide away from the colon for a good clean margin and to surround the cancer lymphatic drainage. And if there is a local spread to surrounding tissue, ureter will be vulnerable for injuries. ...Read more

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How should you decide which colorectal cancer screening test (s) to get and how often to be screened?

Colonoscopy: Average risk people should have colonoscopies every 10 years starting at 50 until 70-75. This may be tempered by medical resources or a persons medical history. ...Read more

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My son has colorectal cancer. Where do I start?

My son has colorectal cancer. Where do I start?

Surgical oncologist: Go to a surgeon who treats a lot of colorectal cancer - a surgical oncologist, colorectal surgeon, or an experienced general surgeon. Surgery is almost always a major part of the treatment process, but he will need tests (colonoscopy if not already done), ct scan, cea. The surgeon is the best expert to be the "captain of the ship". He/she can explain and consult with other oncologists if needed. ...Read more

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How many people get colorectal cancer after 65?

How many people get colorectal cancer after 65?

Enough/a great many.: The incidence of this cancer goes up greatly after age 50. This is why colonoscopy is recommended for anyone over age 50 as a guideline. Both men and women are affectedust about equally. Colonoscopy is recommended by the american cancer society “guidelines for the early detection of cancer” once every 10 years and flexible sigmoidoscopy, barium enema, and virtual colonoscopy every 5 years. ...Read more

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How does colorectal cancer affect the united states population?

How does colorectal cancer affect the united states population?

Getting better: 150, 000 people develop colon cancer annually and 50-60, 000 people will die from this. There is considerable personal cost because of medical and surgical treatments. The economic cost is estimated at $14 billion for 2010, second only to breast cancer at $16b. ...Read more

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What are the factors that make it more likely to get colorectal cancer?

What are the factors that make it more likely to get colorectal cancer?

Numerous: Diet high in red meat, processed and smoked foods, alcohol, smoking, family history colon cancer or polyps, personal history of polyps, colon cancer or inflammatory bowel disease and age over 50. ...Read more

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What is the definition or description of: pet colorectal cancer diagnosis?

What is the definition or description of: pet colorectal cancer diagnosis?

diagnose metastasis: Pet scanning is used for staging of a variety of cancers. Lesions seen on plain scans can be shown to be biologically active of pet scan this then suggests metastatic tumor and stages the disease. If a lesion on plain scan does not "light up" on pet scan, it is assumed to be benign. ...Read more

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What are the best cancer centers in Canada? How about in Vancouver? The cancer in question is Colorectal cancer. Thank you!

What are the best cancer centers in Canada? How about in Vancouver? The cancer in question is Colorectal cancer. Thank you!

Not in Vancouver: As in the US. When one has a specialty problem one goes to a center, not to a location. On this basis when there is a major cancer problem one seeks advice from MD Anderson in Texas or Sloan Kettering in NY. In Canada it is the Princess Margaret Hospital and McGill Univ. Hospital. Other wise any hospital in Vancouver that has a colorectal surgeon can be consulted. ...Read more

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Is colorectal cancer always fatal?

No: Most early colon cancers have a very high success rate of long term survival rate. More advanced cancers that spread to other sites do not have the same success rates, but can still live for years. ...Read more

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What is the pathology of colorectal cancer?

What is the pathology of colorectal cancer?

Adenocarcinoma: Colorectal cancer is usually adenocarcinoma that developed from a underlying polyp. For details on staging visit http://www. Cap. Org/apps/cap. Portal? _nfpb=true&cntvwrptlt_actionoverride=%2fportlets%2fcontentviewer%2fshow&_windowlabel=cntvwrptlt&cntvwrptlt%7bactionform. Contentreference%7d=committees%2fcancer%2fcancer_protocols%2fprotocols_index. Html&_state=maximized&_pagelabel=cntvwr. ...Read more

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Who should get screened for colorectal cancer?

Who should get screened for colorectal cancer?

Everyone, most >50: Most people are considered "average risk" for colorectal cancer, and should begin screening @ 50, typically with a colonoscopy. Some people at increased risk, such as those with inflammatory bowel disease or a family history of colorectal cancer. These people may need screening at a younger age-generally 10 yrs earlier than the age when their relative got colon cancer. Talk w/ your doctor. ...Read more

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Why should I get screened for colorectal cancer?

Because its common: Colorectal cancer is the second most common cancer in the United States. ...Read more

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What can be done about a stoma and colorectal cancer?

What can be done about a stoma and colorectal cancer?

May be temporary: Most stomas that are created following colorectal surgery are temporary. The permanent colostomies are performed when the tumor involves rectal sphincter and an APR is performed. Otherwise the diversion performed is to protect an anastomosis and can be closed several months later when the suture line has healed. A colostomy is also performed when there is bowel obstruction and diversion needed. ...Read more

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Is it possible to have colorectal cancer without having polyps?

Is it possible to have colorectal cancer without having polyps?

Possible: For a small percentage of colon cancers caused by lynch syndrome (also known as hnpcc - hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer), there is an absence of polyps. ...Read more

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What methods are used to screen a person for colorectal cancer?

History: Get personal and family history of colon cancer. Ask if history of colitis, familial polyposis, ibs, lunch syndrome, rectal bleeding, obesity, age over 44yo, rectal mass., un explained anemia needs to be evaluated. Colonoscopy is by far the best way to screen for colon cancer. ...Read more

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How likely is it that I have colorectal cancer if my dad had it?

How likely is it that I have colorectal cancer if my dad had it?

More likely.: Most colon cancer is from adenomatous polyps. Hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer comes from hmsh2 and hmlh1 genes on chromosomes 2 and 3 respectively which repair dna. These have mutations that can lead to colon and other cancers. Diagnosis needs three or more relatives with colon cancer, with one being a first degree relative, >1 case before 50, and >=2 generations. ...Read more

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How many people are being screened for colorectal cancer each year?

How many people are being screened for colorectal cancer each year?

~1.6 million/year: The national cancer institute estimates that about 1.6 million screening colonoscopies are performed each year in the United States. Colonoscopy is not the only way to screen for colorectal cancer, but collecting these statistics on a national level is much more difficult. The other methods include sigmoidoscopy, fecal occult blood testing, and ct-based screening tests. ...Read more

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Is there any way to help prevent the return of my colorectal cancer?

Is there any way to help prevent the return of my colorectal cancer?

4-Tiered Strategy: Surveillance: at the advice of your gastroenterologist, schedule routine colonoscopies; healthy habits: follow a diet high in veggies, fruits, and whole-grains, try to limit red meat and alcohol, exercise regularly; chemoprevention: talk to your oncologist about taking folate (folic acid) supplements and/or nsaids; genetic testing: if you have many relatives with colon ca, you may be a candidate for testing. ...Read more

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What diet should I follow to prevent colorectal cancer from occurring?

What diet should I follow to prevent colorectal cancer from occurring?

Eat your veggies: Population studies show groups that eat high fiber, grains, fruit, veggies, legumes have lower rates. Calcium foods (no/low fat dairy), may help. Low intake meat, especially processed meats may help. Fiber supplements are less helpful than fiber foods. Low (sat) fat, high fiber may be a good combo.
Dash diet (dietary approach to stop hypertension): easy, tasty, healthy. Find it online. ...Read more

Dr. Barry Rosen
4,351 Doctors shared insights

Cancer (Definition)

Cancer is a group of diseases that is characterized by uncontrolled cell growth leading to invasion of surrounding tissues that spread to other parts of the body. Cancer can begin anywhere in the body and is usually related to one or more genetic mutations that allow normal cells to become malignant by interfering with internal cellular control mechanisms, such as programmed cell death or by preventing ...Read more


Dr. Keith Monson
211 Doctors shared insights

Proctology (Definition)

Proctologists are physicians who have specialized knowledge to diagnose and surgically treat disorders affecting the colon, rectum, and anus. Such disorders may include hemorrhoids, colorectal ...Read more