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Doctor insights on: Elbow Lateral Collateral Ligament

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What is lateral collateral ligament laxity?

What is lateral collateral ligament laxity?

Loose ligament: Laxity is an orthopaedic term for looseness. Normally, ligaments don't really stretch much. If a ligament gets partially torn, it can be functionally lengthened which can make a joint unstable. Some people have more lax ligaments than others. If there are no symptoms of instability, no worries! ...Read more

Ligament (Definition)

A fibrous band of tissue that connects one bone to another. They hold joints in place. Dr. Fox's trivia test: what one bone is the only one ...Read more


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Is tennis elbow [lateral epicondylitis] surgery painful?

Is tennis elbow [lateral epicondylitis] surgery painful?

Tennis elbow: No the surgery is not too painful. It can be done through a small incision or an arthroscope as an outpatient procedure. ...Read more

Dr. Allen Lu Dr. Lu
3 doctors agreed:
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What causes lateral collateral ligament strain?

Dr. Allen Lu Dr. Lu
3 doctors agreed:
What causes lateral collateral ligament strain?

Large forces: Lateral collateral ligament strains are relatively uncommon. Lateral collateral injuries can occur with direct forceful blows to the inside of the knee, high energy trauma such as car accidents, motorcycle accidents, and falls from height. It can also be associated with other ligament injuries such as PCL and less commonly acl tears. ...Read more

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Lateral epicondylitis, tendinopathy with multiple tendon ruptures along extensor tendon. Treatment options?

Lateral epicondylitis, tendinopathy with multiple tendon ruptures along extensor tendon. Treatment options?

That is a very com--: Plex problem that you have. Is it in the same arm or elbow area? Is this from an injury? Without being seen ; examined/investigated, its difficult to address all your issues in a meaningful way. You need to see an orthopod or a elbow/shoulder surgeon to get the best advice, as otherwise you'll get a pot pouri of suggestions, which may or may not help. Good luck. ...Read more

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Anterior cruciate ligament knee injury, what to do?

Anterior cruciate ligament knee injury, what to do?

See a specialist.: See a fellowship trained sports medicine orthopedic knee surgeon, who has experience with ACL's. ...Read more

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Athroscopic debridement & menisectomy, partial medial & lateral. Grd1 oa changes lt medial femoral condyle, large posterior horn tear lateral meniscus?

Athroscopic debridement & menisectomy, partial medial & lateral. Grd1 oa changes lt medial femoral condyle, large posterior horn tear lateral meniscus?

Yikes: The wear on your lateral side and lateral meniscus tear is a not great. The lateral meniscus is responsible for balancing and distribution of force more so than the medial. Be very cautious returning to plant and pivot sports. ...Read more

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Bone bruising involving the medial aspect of the medial femoral condyle. Partial thickness tear of the medial collateral ligament adjacent to the fem.

Bone bruising involving the medial aspect of the medial femoral condyle. Partial thickness tear of the medial collateral ligament adjacent to the fem.

Orthopedic followup: Sounds like a traumatic injury, athletic or otherwise. How recent? How much pain, swelling do you have? What level of activity are you returning to? An orthopedic specialist & physical therapist can help. ...Read more

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Surgery? Degeneration posterior horn of meniscus, tendinosis/partial thickness tearing of patellar tendon at interpolar patella, subcutaneous edema

Surgery? Degeneration posterior horn of meniscus, tendinosis/partial thickness tearing of patellar tendon at interpolar patella,  subcutaneous edema

When nonop tx fails: Surgery is not usually the first line of treatment for chronic injuries such as you described: degenerative (chronic) PHMMT, and patellar tendinosis (vs partial inferio pole tear). Nonoperative management: physical therapy, stretching program, NSAIDs, rest, ice, may all help considerably. Arthroscopy to debride a degenerative meniscal tear due to persistent mechanical symptoms may be needed later. ...Read more

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Mri shows oblique nondisplaced tear posterior horn and body medial meniscus, medial meniscal protrusion into the medial gutter. Will i need surgery?

Mri shows oblique nondisplaced tear posterior horn and body medial meniscus, medial meniscal protrusion into the medial gutter. Will i need surgery?

Surgery : Surgery is most likely needed to resolve your problem. Meniscus tears simply do not heal on their own, regardless of conservative treatment (including prolotherapy). It is possible that your symptoms of pain, etc will improve with time without surgery...But that doesn't mean the tear healed. In fact, the tear will most likely get bigger leading to additional damage if not taken care of soon. ...Read more

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Treatment for torn meniscus and partial torn lateral collateral ligament in left knee diagnosed by MRI scan?

Treatment for torn meniscus and partial torn lateral collateral ligament in left knee diagnosed by MRI scan?

Depends: The treatment depends on your exam and symptoms but most meniscal tears are well treated by arthroscopic partial menisectomy while the partial lcl tear probably requires bracing and rehab. Again this is predicated by your exam and not the mri. ...Read more

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Tibial lateral plateau fracture?

Tibial lateral plateau fracture?

Fracture: The tibial plateu is the part of the top of the tibia that forms the knee joint. There is a lateral and medial part of the joint called the plateu. The lateral plateu is the outside oart of the joint. It can be fractured. ...Read more

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MRI of knee shows "Oblique tear posterior horn medial meniscus, lateral patellar plica and minimal synovial knee effusion" will I need surgery? or ?

MRI of knee shows "Oblique tear posterior horn medial meniscus, lateral patellar plica and minimal synovial knee effusion" will I need surgery? or ?

Possibly: It depends on the degree of tear, how much it is effecting your daily activities and whether it responds to conservative treatment. If the plica does not get better with anti inflammatory meds you will most likely need arthroscopic surgery to remove it, although your orthopedic surgeon will be the best MD to determine that. ...Read more

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Advanced articular cartilage loss in medial compartment of tibio-femoral and patella-femoral joints. Would partial (unicondylar) knee replacement work?

Advanced articular cartilage loss in medial compartment of tibio-femoral and patella-femoral joints. Would partial (unicondylar) knee replacement work?

Maybe: This decision is best made by your own orthopedist who has direct access to your x rays. A second opinion never hurts. In someone so young, if you can get away with something short of a total joint replacement, it is always preferable to do so. ...Read more

Dr. Allen Lu Dr. Lu
3 doctors agreed:
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What causes lateral collateral ligament strain?

Dr. Allen Lu Dr. Lu
3 doctors agreed:

Large forces: Lateral collateral ligament strains are relatively uncommon. Lateral collateral injuries can occur with direct forceful blows to the inside of the knee, high energy trauma such as car accidents, motorcycle accidents, and falls from height. It can also be associated with other ligament injuries such as PCL and less commonly acl tears. ...Read more

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I tore my lateral collateral ligament. How long does it take to heal without surgery?

I  tore my lateral collateral ligament. How long does it take to heal without surgery?

6-12 weeks: The lateral (fibular) collateral ligament is uncommonly injured, but if it is injured in isolation, it can be treated in a hinged knee brace x 6 wks and may heal on its own. Stress xrays can be used to measure if it heals. This is followed by strengthening and a return to activities between 8-12 weeks. ...Read more

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What is lateral collateral ligament laxity?

Loose ligament: Laxity is an orthopaedic term for looseness. Normally, ligaments don't really stretch much. If a ligament gets partially torn, it can be functionally lengthened which can make a joint unstable. Some people have more lax ligaments than others. If there are no symptoms of instability, no worries! ...Read more

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If I sprained my lateral collateral ligament what can be done to speed recovery so I can return to soccer?

If I sprained my lateral collateral ligament what can be done to speed recovery so I can return to soccer?

Brace: A lateral (fibular) collateral ligament injury can be treated in a hinged knee brace x 6 wks followed by strengthening and return to activities in 8-12 weeks. Stress xrays can help determine if it heals correctly. However, this is commonly associated with other ligament injuries and usually needs to be surgically reconstructed in this setting. That requires a wait of 1 year to return to sport. ...Read more

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How do you treat an injury to the lateral collateral ligament?

How do you treat an injury to the lateral collateral ligament?

6-12 weeks: The lateral (fibular) collateral ligament is uncommonly injured, but if it is injured in isolation, it can be treated in a hinged knee brace x 6 wks and may heal on its own. Stress xrays can be used to measure if it heals. This is followed by strengthening and a return to activities between 8-12 weeks. Often, it requires a surgery to reconstruct it and the surrounding "posterolateral corner.". ...Read more

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How do you evaluate and treat lateral collateral ligament pain?

LCL evaluation knee: The lcl in the knee is evaluated at o degrees (full extension) and at 30 degrees of flexion with varus stress applied. Degree of opening is assessed by estimating in mm and comparing to opposite side; lcl sprains or tears are measured as grade i, ii, or iii. The posterolateral corner (e.g. Arcuate complex) should be assessed as well as the cruciate and medial collateral ligaments. Mri is also used. ...Read more

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What to do if I have swelling at fibular head where the lateral collateral ligament hooks in. could What to do if I have a stress fractur?

What to do if I have swelling at fibular head where the lateral collateral ligament hooks in. could What to do if I have a stress fractur?

Exam/ X-rays / rest: If u already 'know ' u have 'swelling' @ the proximal fibula w/ associated pain and no definitive injury then a stress fracture is possible. Get a thorough examination, X-rays by a board certified ORS . Bone scan and or MRI can be diagnostic.best of luck! ...Read more

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Have I torn my lateral collateral ligament in my knee. Is surgery always needed?

Have I torn my lateral collateral ligament in my knee. Is surgery always needed?

No, but often: The lateral (fibular) collateral ligament is uncommonly injured, but if it is injured in the setting of other ligament injuries (acl, pcl), it needs to be reconstructed to help prevent the other ligament surgeries from stretching out over time. If it is injured in isolation, it can be treated in a hinged knee brace x 6 wks and may heal on its own. Stress xrays can be used to measure if it heals. ...Read more

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Constant knee pain seems lateral collateral ligament is tight & painful?

Constant knee pain seems lateral collateral ligament is tight & painful?

Many possibilities: The knee is an important weight bearing joint with a complex inner and outer structure. Your pain could be as a result of many different things. A thorough history and physical exam and possibly some laboratory and radiology exams are needed to determine the exact cause. Causes of pain may include: trauma (fracture, tendon or ligamentous tear, arthritis), infection, and metabolic conditions. ...Read more

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What can be done for knee pain I think is from the lateral collateral ligament associated with joint grinding?

What can be done for knee pain I think is from the lateral collateral ligament associated with joint grinding?

Unlikely: The lateral (or fibular) collateral ligament does not typically cause pain. An injury to the fcl can cause instability in the knee. Unlike the mcl, when it is injured, it does not heal as readily and actually doesn't hurt as much to touch it. Grinding could be instability but usually occurs from a mechanical problem inside the knee. See an orthopaedic surgeon for an evaluation. ...Read more

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I'm feeling a pain in the lateral collateral ligament of my left knee. Who would be better suited to treat me? Chiropractor or physiotherapist?

I'm feeling a pain in the lateral collateral ligament of my left knee. Who would be better suited to treat me? Chiropractor or physiotherapist?

See below: I would recommend you see an orthopedic surgeon for an evaluation of your knee problem and if necessary he could give you orders and instructions for a physiotherapist to follow. Thank you. ...Read more

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Constant knee pain seems lateral. Collateral ligament is tight & painful and it is also causing the joint to grind. What could be causing this?

Constant knee pain seems lateral. Collateral ligament is tight & painful and it is also causing the joint to grind. What could be causing this?

Knee Nightmare: Pain about the knee can be due to many reasons. Medial pain can occur due to ligament, meniscal or bursal injury. Similarly, lateral pain can occur for these reasons but less so for meniscal injury as it is a distinct structure apart from the collateral ligament. A common, but often overlooked, condition is iliotibial band syndrome that can cause pain anywhere from the hip to the lateral knee. ...Read more

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If injured my lateral collateral ligament what wil the doctor advise? Surgery?

If injured my lateral collateral ligament what wil the doctor advise? Surgery?

Depends: The lateral (fibular) collateral ligament is uncommonly injured, but if it is injured in isolation, it can be treated in a hinged knee brace x 6 wks and may heal on its own. Stress xrays can be used to measure if it heals. This is followed by strengthening and a return to activities between 8-12 weeks. Often, it requires a surgery to reconstruct it and the surrounding "posterolateral corner.". ...Read more

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Treatment for torn meniscus and partial torn lateral collateral ligament in left knee diagnosed by MRI scan?

Depends: The treatment depends on your exam and symptoms but most meniscal tears are well treated by arthroscopic partial menisectomy while the partial lcl tear probably requires bracing and rehab. Again this is predicated by your exam and not the mri. ...Read more

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What treatments are there medial collateral ligament?

What treatments are there medial collateral ligament?

Depends: It depends on the severity of the injury. Mild to moderate injury is almost always physical therapy. Severe injury or complete disruption is usually addressed with operative repair. The decision is complex. Based on the age and health of the patient as well as the other parts of the knee that were injured at the time. ...Read more

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Is it safe for me to be biking with a partially torn MCL (medial collateral ligament)?

Is it safe for me to be biking with a partially torn MCL (medial collateral ligament)?

Yes if comfortable: Biking does not stress the mcl so you should be fine if you do not have pain. If you do, a brace may be useful. ...Read more