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Doctor insights on: Dysmetria Ataxia

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How are cerebellar degeneration, cerebellar ataxia and paraneoplastic cerebellar related?

How are cerebellar degeneration, cerebellar ataxia and paraneoplastic cerebellar related?

Ataxia: Cerebellar degneration means that the part of the brain that controlls coordination and balance is losing cells and likely getting smaller. Ataxia is the clumsiness, imbalance, slurred speech and/or abnormal eye movements that can accompany cerebellar degeneration. A paraneoplastic cerebellar syndrome is when the body's immune response to cancer somewhere else damages the cerebellum "by mistake". ...Read more

Dr. Corey Clay
193 doctors shared insights

Ataxia (Definition)

Ataxia means movements without coordination. People with ataxia have incoordination because the parts of the nervous system that control movement and balance are not working properly. Ataxia can be associated with infections, injuries, or degenerative changes in the central nervous system. Ataxias may be hereditary ...Read more


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What's spinocerebellar ataxia?

What's spinocerebellar ataxia?

Archaic term and : Not used in academic settings due to confused terminology. Was used to describe both hereditary and sporadic neurodegenerative ataxias, but now classify these based on genetic and molecular markers. Amongst these, friedreich's ataxia, ataxia telangiectasia, sca 1-7, mitochondrial. Ataxia is incoordination of movement due to cerebellar dysfunction. ...Read more

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What are ataxia, cerebellar or spinocerebellar degeneration?

What are ataxia,  cerebellar or spinocerebellar degeneration?

Progressive disorder: Genetic and familial conditions can lead to a progressive degeneration of the cerebellum and brainstem structures. There are many different types. Multiple sclerosis can also cause progressive balance problems that can mimic degenerative disease. Tumors can also mimic degenerative disease. A quality MRI and good neurological evaluation is necessary. ...Read more

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What is friedreich ataxia?

What is friedreich ataxia?

Friedrich's ataxia: FA is a condition that causes weakness, scoliosis, ataxia, visual impairment, heart disease and diabetes mellitus. It is an inherited condition that normally affects people as a child or as a young adult. http://www.curefa.org/whatis.html ...Read more

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What is friedrichs ataxia?

What is friedrichs ataxia?

Hereditary ataxia: An autosomal dominant disorder causing mitochondrial dysfunction and worsening due to oxidative stress. Spinal disorder usually presenting at a young age, with ataxia, dysarthria, leg weakness, numbness, pes cavus, scoliosis, and cardiomyopathy. Genetic testing for frataxin is confirmatory. There is a variation of ataxia with vitamin E deficiency which is similar, but responds to vit e. ...Read more

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Explain the condition called sudden loss of coordination (cerebellar ataxia).?

Explain the condition called sudden loss of coordination (cerebellar ataxia).?

Cerebellar Ataxia: Acute cerebellar ataxia is defined as the sudden loss of coordination or abnormal gait due to abnormal function of the cerebellum. Causes are vast, and include tumors, infectious diseases, and genetic (inherited) etiologies. This is best managed by a neurologist (specialist in the nervous system). ...Read more

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Is spino-cerebellar ataxia contagious?

No: Spinocerebellar degenerations are genetic disorders that run in families. There is no infectious component. ...Read more

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What treats ataxia telangiectasia!?

Symptomatic: Ataxia telangiectasia is a genetic condition with no cure. As such, therapy is directed at treating consequences of this disease. For example, it is best to avoid excess radiation (excess x-rays, ct scans) be wary of any signs of infection (due to immune compromise) and be vigilant about signs of malignancy (weight loss, night sweats, etc.). Physical therapy is also recommended for ataxia. ...Read more

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What sort of disorder is friedreich ataxia?

Friedrich's ataxia: FA is an inherited disorder that affects strength and coordination, among other things, and often interferes with walking. http://www.curefa.org/whatis.html ...Read more

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Cerebral palsy and myoclonus related?

Cerebral palsy and myoclonus related?

Spasticity: CP and myoclonus involve over active stretch reflexes. They are caused by release of these reflexes from higher cortical brain control. ...Read more

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What is spastic dyplegia of cerebral palsy?

What is spastic dyplegia of cerebral palsy?

Legs>arms: Spastic diplegia is a condition in which the lower extremities are more affected than uppers. Intelligence may be normal and ambulation with braces or ankle supports may be good ...Read more

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Does cerebellar ataxia spread?

Does cerebellar ataxia spread?

It can be: Cerebellar ataxia is a description of examination. Causes can be congenital, degenerative, caused by chronic damage from alcohol or dilantin, or associated with structural defects of the cerebellum. It can also be an indication of cerebellar tumor. Many patients following head injury recover with poor coordination and ataxia due to damage to the deep structures of the brain. ...Read more

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What is primitive cerebellar ataxia ?

What is primitive cerebellar ataxia ?

Loss of balance: And muscular control. Speech may be slurred and the patient behaves as though she were drunk with alcohol. A rare cause is vitamin b1 dependency. This is the same as deficiency but the patient needs huge doses of the vitamin. There are published cases of this. It can even be intermittent and inititiated by head injury, or a simple infection. ...Read more

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What's olivopontine cerebellar atrophy?

What's olivopontine cerebellar atrophy?

Degenerative disease: A large group of sporadic and inherited disorders with symptom onset in the 5th decade of life. Main manifestations include ataxia, first in the legs then arms, hands and facial muscles.Characterized by extensive degeneration of the cerebellum, pontine nuclei and medullary olivary nuclei, opca's have been described with many other clinical findings. Treatment is symtom specific and variable. ...Read more

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Whats multifocal motor neuropathy?

Whats multifocal motor neuropathy?

Neuropathy: Multifocal motor neuropathy is a progressive muscle disorder characterized by muscle weakness in the hands, with differences from one side of the body to the other in the specific muscles involved. It affects men much more than women. Symptoms also include muscle wasting, cramping, and involuntary contractions or twitching of the leg muscles. ...Read more

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What can cause spinocerebellar ataxia?

Variety of causes...: The causes of spinocerebellar ataxia span several pages, but can be categorized as: hereditary, infectious, medication-related, alcohol-related, traumatic, vitamin deficiency related, etc. The start of an evaluation for ataxia includes a detailed neurological exam by a movement disorder specialist and a brain MRI to see whether the cerebellum is indeed shrinking. ...Read more

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Treatment for progressive gait imbalace and progressive dysarthria slurred speech?

Treatment for progressive gait imbalace and progressive dysarthria slurred speech?

Uncover cause: Likely best to see a neurologist. There are multiple problems which can cause this, and treatment follows diagnosis. ...Read more

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What is extraocular dysmetria?

What is extraocular dysmetria?

Brusque motions: Dysmetria is an inability to contol muscle movements, so movements are brusque and may be made with more force than needed. Extraocular muscles are those that control the eye muscles, so this would be poorly controlled eye movements. ...Read more

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Does spinal cerebellar ataxia effect the heart musscle?

Does spinal cerebellar ataxia effect the heart musscle?

Yes: Friedrich's ataxia, a form described in the 1860's, does cause a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, classically. Some of the other forms may or may not involve the heart. ...Read more

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What are the symptoms of friedreich's ataxia?

What are the symptoms of friedreich's ataxia?

Ataxia: The first symptom to appear is usually difficulty walking. The ataxia gradually worsens and slowly spreads to the arms and the trunk. There is often loss of sensation in the extremities, which may spread to other parts of the body. Slowness and slurring of speech develops and can get progressively worse. Many people with later stages of friedreich’s ataxia develop hearing and vision loss. ...Read more

Dr. James Dukelow
56 doctors shared insights

Loss Of Coordination (Definition)

Loss of coordination is a symptom in which some parts of a person's body should but do not work together in a coordinated way. One example is when several muscles move in an uncoordinated manner, ...Read more


Dr. Jeffrey Satinover
125 doctors shared insights

Trouble Walking (Definition)

The inability to ambulate in a normal manner. This gait disturbance can be due to a host of reasons to include, but not limited to, orthopedic, ...Read more