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Doctor insights on: Duodenal Biopsy

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What does a duodenum biopsy show?

What does a duodenum biopsy show?

Duodenum: Biopsies of the duodenum are usually performed to rule out inflammation of the lining or infection. Most commonly, biopsies are used to determine if the pathology is consistent with celiac disease. ...Read more

Dr. Janice Alexander
2 doctors shared insights

Biopsy (Definition)

Biopsy is tissue removed by needle or cutting to remove part of a body part. It is usually a small amount of material that is processed by a pathologist. Most of the time it is stained and looked at through a microscope to arrive at a diagnosis. Special processes are done for some tissues or problems. The purpose is to tell what the problem is (diagnosis). ...Read more


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What are the side effects of duodenum biopsies? Will the duodenum heal? Dr took multiple samples measuring a total of 2.5x0.3x0.2cm. Why so much?

What are the side effects of duodenum biopsies? Will the duodenum heal? Dr took multiple samples measuring a total of 2.5x0.3x0.2cm. Why so much?

Minmal: Usually a very small amount of bleeding will occur at the biopsy site. Main hazard is if the biopsy includes a small artery, which can bleed more seriously, or if the biopsy pokes a hole in the bowel wall , which causes peritonitis. Both of these complications are immediately obvious. ...Read more

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Could lupus cause mild inflammatory changes on colon and duodenal biopsy?

Could lupus cause mild inflammatory changes on colon and duodenal biopsy?

Unlikely, but...: ... If the pathologist has only signed out "mild inflammatory changes" and given no other description, what's really the point is, "this isn't tumor, and it isn't something i can diagnose as any specific illness." the clinician can ask the pathologist, "can the mild duodenitis be due to taking motrin?" and the pathologist can probably answer. Key is "this is a non-tumor biopsy" which is good. ...Read more

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Second portion duodenum biopsy showing presevrd villous architecture with mod. #'s of lymphocytes. They are suggesting subclinical sprue. What mean?

Second portion duodenum biopsy showing presevrd villous architecture with mod. #'s of lymphocytes. They are suggesting subclinical sprue. What mean?

Lymphs where?: A good pathologist would have specified (& probably did) exactly where the lymphocytes were (in the epithelium is more worrisome than in the mucosa), and whether they were the type of t-cell that suggests celiac sprue. You'll get labs for celiac disease and perhaps a trial of a gluten-free diet depending on why you had the biopsy in the first place. ...Read more

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After EGD and Duodenal biopsy I see watery black stools. How long will this last or should I report it right away?

After EGD and Duodenal biopsy I see watery black stools.  How long will this last or should I report it right away?

ASAP-you're bleeding: Melena, by definition, is passage of dark stools stained with denatured blood. As we established in prior healthtap answers, all dark stool is not melena, but the temporal relationship of biopsies & melena in your case is highly suspicious for unabated procedure-related hemorrhage. Call your endoscopist RIGHT NOW please as well as 911--& get to the Emergency Room for urgent care. ...Read more

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Had emergency egd for stuck food, had inflammation in esophagus, stomach & duodenum. Biopsy negative. Are all infections checked or only certain ones?

Had emergency egd for stuck food, had inflammation in esophagus, stomach & duodenum. Biopsy negative. Are all infections checked or only certain ones?

Hard to know...: When trauma is involved, most endoscopists will minimize biopsies during the "rescue" endoscopy, opting instead to bring the patient back for a second look when the inflammation has calmed down. It is at the time of this second endoscopic look that dilation and extensive biopsies can be more safely pursued. Your biopsy may have included a check of cmv, herpes, fungus, h.Pylori or none of these. ...Read more

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What causes mild inflammation and gastric foveolar metaplasia in duodenum. On biopsy. No h pylori ? No medications.

Secretions: Foveolar hyperplasia and metaplasia is a response of one epithelium to injury or as a reactive pattern. This is most often seen in the stomach. However, if there is irritation (chemical by secretions from the pancreas or liver) or inflammation (gallstones, alcohol, etc), you can get metaplasia in the duodenum. In general, helicobacter pylori don't grow in the duodenal ph. ...Read more

Duodenum (Definition)

The duodenum is the first part of the small intestine. It is responsible for aspects of digestion and nutrient absorption immediately after ...Read more