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Doctor insights on: Does Anyone Know Some Facts About Hemochromatosis

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Does anyone know some facts about hemochromatosis?

Does anyone know some facts about hemochromatosis?

Common & easy: In the common form, the gut absorbs iron too well -- something of a plus, but too much iron will ruin the liver, pancreas, adrenals, heart, sex drive, and joints (base of thumb especially) and turn you gray. Easy to test for by labs, and easy to treat by draining a pint or two of blood every week. Maybe one person in 200 has the genes to get it, and some still get missed. ...Read more

Dr. (Liz)Phuong Tran
316 doctors shared insights

Hemochromatosis (Definition)

Hemochromatosis is a medical condition caused by iron accumulation in the body. It can be the result of underlying hereditary disease or be due ...Read more


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Which dr sees hemochromatosis?

Which dr sees hemochromatosis?

Any: Any competent primary care physician can diagnose and arrange for treatment hemochromatosis. You may get sent to the gastroenterologist, cardiologist, endocrinologist and geneticist. The key is that if this is common hemochromatosis, you have the serious disease out of all of them that's easiest to manage effectively. ...Read more

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Why do people develop hemochromatosis?

Why do people develop hemochromatosis?

It's in the genes: In hereditary (= inherited from parents) hemochromatosis, too much iron is absorbed by the gut & deposits in tissues. Liver, heart, other damage can result. It is autosomal recessive: both parents must carry the gene & not all offspring will be affected. Secondary (= due to other causes) hemochromatosis can occur with certain types of hemolytic anemia (red blood cells bursting, releasing iron). ...Read more

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Do a lot of people get hemochromatosis?

It's relatively rare: Hemochromatosis is a disorder where a person has too much iron in the blood. This can cause significant problems as iron will deposit in areas like the hear and liver. While it is typically rare, it can be seen if someone takes too much iron supplement. Generally, men should not take iron if they are otherwise healthy. Women, on the other hand, are usually ok provided they are still mentruati. ...Read more

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What are the symptoms of hemochromatosis?

Varies: Many times, it is only presented with high iron saturation and or iron storage without having any symptoms. However, the clinical manifestations of iron accumulation can include liver disease, elevation of liver enzymes, skin pigmentation, diabetes mellitus, arthropathy, impotence in males, and cardiac enlargement with or without heart failure or conduction defects etc. ...Read more

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What happens when you have hemochromatosis?

Easy Rx: The key is that you got diagnosed, hopefully early. 1 person in 200 will be symptomatic with this. I'm going to assume the diagnosis is correct & it's common hemochromatosis. You'll have a pint of blood drained maybe 2x/week until you feel better / labs turn good. The blahs, thumb pain, lackluster love life, and whatever else will improve. Untreated, it kills you, treated you do great. ...Read more

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What is the impact of hemochromatosis on you?

What is the impact of hemochromatosis on you?

Death if untreated: Thankfully, if it's picked up early, you're spared decades of ill-health and ultimately death from involvement of the heart, liver, and/or endocrine pancreas. Of all the really nasty common diseases, hemochromatosis is the easiest to treat, by blood-bank-style donations. ...Read more

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Could i go into the army with hemochromatosis?

Could i go into the army with hemochromatosis?

No: AR 40-501 Ch 2-e(5) "current or history of metabolic liver disease, including but not limited to hemochromatosis..." No chance of a waiver for that one. ...Read more

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My friend has a hemochromatosis? What is that?

Excess iron: Some people have a hereditary condition leading to excessive iron accumulation in the body. Excess iron is toxic. It is easily treatable. See this site for more info. http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/hemochromatosis/basics/definition/con-20023606 ...Read more