Top
10
Doctor insights on: Does A Labrum Tear Always Mean Automatic Surgery

Share
1

1
Does a labrum tear always mean automatic surgery?

Does a labrum tear always mean automatic surgery?

Not necessarily.: If you are referring to you shoulder, it would depend on your age, function, intended activities and extent. You should see an orthopedist with expertise in the shoulder for an opinion and perhaps a 2nd or 3rd opinion. If young and active and significant tear, most likely an intervention will be needed. For an older more sedentary person, it may be debatable as to need for surgery. Get opinon! ...Read more

See 2 more doctor answers
2

2
What rehab is recommended for a labrum tear (without surgery)?

What rehab is recommended for a labrum tear (without surgery)?

Depends: Depends on the symptoms of your labral tear and injury, and where the labral tear is. The labrum covers 360degrees( the entire glenoid). Anterior labral tears w/ no instability are treated differently than those w/ instability . Some labral tears in 40 yr. Old are asympomatic. Posterior labral tears @ the biceps tendon origin are frequently symptomatic.(slap tears). Need more info to answer q... ...Read more

3

3
When is surgery needed for a labrum tear? And how long is recovery? (I tore it 3 months ago in my shoulder)

When is surgery needed for a labrum tear? And how long is recovery? (I tore it 3 months ago in my shoulder)

Common: if the labrum is torn and causes pain or instability particularly inthe young age patient ... surgery is likely to be needed and advised ...Read more

5

5
I have a shoulder surgery for labrum tear. What should I expect?

I have a shoulder surgery for labrum tear. What should I expect?

More info: What were your symptoms prior to surgery? Were you a multiple dislocator? It can restabilize your shoulder to prevent dislocations. It can also make your shoulder more stiff. ...Read more

6

6
Got a posterior labrum tear 10 to 6 o'clock but full range of motion. Should I consider surgery?

Got a posterior labrum tear 10 to 6 o'clock but full range of motion. Should I consider surgery?

It depends: Your need for surgery depends on what prompted you to get the study that showed the tear. If you have full range of motion, full strength, good shoulder stability, and can do what you want to do with your arm, then the answer is no. If your shoulder shifts on you, and you cannot do things that you want to do because of it, then you should consider having it fixed. ...Read more

See 2 more doctor answers
8

8
Could you offer specific rehab advice for a hip labrum tear? No surgery has or will be done :)

Could you offer specific rehab advice for a hip labrum tear? No surgery has or will be done :)

Depends on details: Hip labral tears occur because of 3 reasons: following traumatic partial dislocation, if there is femeroacetabular impingement (fai), or in young people, hyperlaxity with excessive motion. After trauma, a general hip strengthening program is best. In fai, the positions where the impingement occurs must be avoided. In hyperlaxity, extremes of motion are avoided and muscles are strengthened. ...Read more

9

9
Mra finding of "cleft" within anterosuperior acetabular labrum extending to choncdrolabral junction.. Suggestive of acetabular labral tear means what?

Mra finding of "cleft" within anterosuperior acetabular labrum extending to choncdrolabral junction.. Suggestive of acetabular labral tear means what?

Small tear: The labrum is rim of cartilage around the acetabulum which helps stabilize the femoral head in the hip joint socket. Labral tears can develop from chronic wear and tear or more acute injury; in younger patients they are sometimes related to abnormal morphology of the acetabulum or femoral neck, leading to femoroacetabular impingment (fai). ...Read more

10

10
What does "globular appearance of the anterior inferior glenoid labrum suggesting chronic tear" mean? "arthgrom of shoulder performed". Also says "no acuteor displaced labral tear is identified".

Complicated but...: Sometimes when things tear, they can ball up and look globular. This often happens when something is chronic in nature. Just remember that the MRI is only one piece of the puzzle. You must correlated what the MRI shows to a good physical examination. Not everything listed on the MRI is always the cause of the pain. I would ask your physician to explain it more. ...Read more

See 2 more doctor answers