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Doctor insights on: Doctor Thinks Tracheomalacia

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My doctor thinks that my daughter is suffering from tracheomalacia. What does this mean?

My doctor thinks that my daughter is suffering from tracheomalacia. What does this mean?

Weakness of windpipe: Malacia is weakness of a portion of the airway (trachea is the first portion of the airway and bronchomalacia is weakness of airways further down in the lungs). It can occur when someone is born premature, after a bad infection or after a tracheostomy. Usually wheezing in the upper airway with shortness of breath is common. Breathing tests can help suggest it is present / other tests often need. ...Read more

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The doctors suspect my 6 month old has a vascular ring if so does that mean he coud also have tracheomalacia?

The doctors suspect my 6 month old has a vascular ring if so does that mean he coud also have tracheomalacia?

Vascular ring: Yes, in some cases. The vascular ring, is a congenital malformation, in which one of the embryological dorsal aortas is not reabsorbed, and does not grow at the same rate as the body does. No medical therapy exists for the definitive treatment of vascular rings. Preoperatively, the patient should be given adequate nutritional support as well as general respiratory care and appropriate treatment of any respiratory tract infection. Surgery should not be delayed in the presence of a respiratory tract infection, because the division of the ring allows more adequate and complete clearing of respiratory secretions. ...Read more

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What are the symptoms of tracheomalacia?

What are the symptoms of tracheomalacia?

Respiratory issues: Tracheomalacia is a weakness of the supportive cartilage of the windpipe (trachea) which can present as difficulty breathing (stridor) usually presenting during exercise or other exertion. ...Read more

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What are best treatments for children with tracheomalacia?

What are best treatments for children with tracheomalacia?

Non surgical: Tracheomalacia is rarely serious enough to need surgery. The best treatments are pulmonary medications like asthma medications. If necessary, nighttime CPAP or bipap therapy like used for sleep apnea can help a lot. It is best to make sure there isn't an underlying cause. Tracheomalacia is not the same as laryngomalacia and is not related. ...Read more

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Help docs! i'm trying to find out what causes tracheomalacia in newborns?

Help docs! i'm trying to find out what causes tracheomalacia in newborns?

Dont know: There is a lot if information what what it is but not the what causes it. So do not know if it is just genetic (most likely) or environmental (in which case we should see a whole lot more of it). Infants do outgrow it. I would not be too worried about what causes it as the baby already has it...So lets deal with the here and now... ...Read more

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What is tracheomalacia?

What is tracheomalacia?

Tracheomalacia: Tracheomalacia is the collapsing of the trachea (the tube that brings air from the back of the throat to the lungs) with breathing in (inspiration). The front part of the trachea has hard cartilage, and the back a soft membrane. In patients with emphysema or other conditions, that soft part can collapse with inspiration causing a partial obstruction and difficulties breathing. ...Read more

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What causes tracheomalacia?

What causes tracheomalacia?

Uncommon: Tracheomalacia is collapse of the trachea (the windpipe) and is often confused with laryngomalacia which is collapse of the voicebox (which is above the trachea). Tracheomalacia is quite uncommon in infants except those with repaired t-e fistulas, and those with unrepaired vascular rings. ...Read more

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Need info on tracheomalacia?

Need info on tracheomalacia?

Tracheal flattening: Usually do to weakness of the cartilage "rings" along front wall of trachea. Usually these cartilage rings are u-shaped and prop the trachea open. Some call invagination of the soft back wall of trachea as tracheomalacia. Not really, but has same effect of narrowing the tracheal opening. In latter case, can place flat prosthesis to keep soft posterior wall from invaginating in. Can also stent. ...Read more

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What can affect my tracheomalacia?

What can  affect my tracheomalacia?

Forceful exhalation: Breathing out too forcefully can make the effect of tracheomalacia worse ... Also weight gain that causes the fat in the mediastinum around the trachea can compress the trachea more ... ...Read more

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Tracheomalacia, what is that caused by?

Tracheomalacia, what is that caused by?

Rare: Tracheomalacia is a rare complication following prolonged endotracheal intubation for any reason and results from compromise of the arterial circulation due to prolonged mechanical compression of the inflated balloon against tracheal mucosa. It takes weeks for this to occur so doesn't happen routinely following heart bypass or other operations. Tracheostomy prevents it. ...Read more

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What is tracheomalacia, can you help me?

What is tracheomalacia, can you help me?

Tracheomalacia: ... Is weakness or floppiness of the cartilage of the trachea that results in narrowing or collapse of the trachea when you breathe in. It can be something you are born with, or it can result from compression or from infection for inflammation, and also from having a breathing tube for a long time. If you are concerned about tracheomalacia, you should see a doctor. ...Read more

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Tell me about tracheomalacia in infants?

Tell me about tracheomalacia in infants?

Uncommon: Tracheomalacia is collapse of the trachea (the windpipe) and is often confused with laryngomalacia which is collapse of the voicebox (which is above the trachea). Tracheomalacia is quite uncommon in infants except those with repaired t-e fistulas, and those with unrepaired vascular rings. ...Read more

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What is the etiology of tracheomalacia after bypass?

What is the etiology of tracheomalacia after bypass?

Not sure: Cannot think of connection between bypass surgery and tracheomalacia ... May have already had undiagnosed tracheomalacia, but diagnosed by anesthesiologist or intensivist while intubated for your bypass surgery ... Also prolonged mechanical ventilator support, with prolonged intubation may have caused inflammation of your trachea that may have caused some weakening of your tracheal cartilages. ...Read more

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My 2mos son has larynomalacia, tracheomalacia & bronchial problems. Is trachea an only option? Traheal stent, do they work & are they comfortable?

My 2mos son has larynomalacia, tracheomalacia & bronchial problems. Is trachea an only option? Traheal stent, do they work & are they comfortable?

Tracheomalacia: If the diagnosis is indeed correct, and his is severe enough that it is severely affecting his breathing ability and/or growth, a trach may indeed be one of the few options for him. Most infants do not need their laryngotracheomalacia treated - as the trachea develops on its own, symptoms would resolve. But if severe enough, the airway must be opened and that usually involves a tracheostomy. ...Read more

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Are tracheomalacia & bronchomalacia the same thing? Or are they different?

Are tracheomalacia & bronchomalacia the same thing? Or are they different?

No: Tracheomalacia: Flaccidity of the tracheal walls secondary to defective cartilaginous rings. Bronchomalacia: Flaccidity of the bronchial wall secondary ot defective cartilageinous ring These conditions can be primary, that is the cartilage is lacking or secondary due to compression on the cartilage. They are often together. ...Read more

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What is the etiology of tracheomalacia after heart bypass?

What is the etiology of tracheomalacia after heart bypass?

Rare: Tracheomalacia is a rare complication following prolonged endotracheal intubation for any reason and results from compromise of the arterial circulation due to prolonged mechanical compression of the inflated balloon against tracheal mucosa. It takes weeks for this to occur so doesn't happen routinely following heart bypass or other operations. Tracheostomy prevents it. ...Read more

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Why do patients often develop tracheomalacia after cardiac surgery?

Very rare: Patients do not often develop tracheomalacia after heart surgery. It is very rare for that to happen. When it does occur it is related to prolonged need for a ventilator and a breathing tube that is inverted prior to surgery. Usualy that tube is removed immediately after surgery of 4-6 hours later. If it is needed for more than 10-14 days then a tracheostomy is done to prevent such problems. ...Read more

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