Top
20
Doctor insights on: Dobutamine Act Receptor

Share

Receptor (Definition)

An organ, cell or molecule that accepts an outside signal and causes an internal change. Eyes receive light, touch receptors send messages to the brain when stimulated by pressure and estrogen receptors bind Estradiol causing responses of normal breast, ovary and uterus cells to rising and falling levels of the female steroid hormones. Most of the time "receptor" refers to one ...Read more


2

2
What adrenergic receptors does vasopressin bind to?

What adrenergic receptors does vasopressin bind to?

It doesn't: Hi. Vasopressin (aka antidiuretic hormone) does not bind to adrenergic receptors. Vasopression has its own family of receptors expressed in the vasculature and kidneys. ...Read more

3

3
Do norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors suppress growth of brain?

Do norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors suppress growth of brain?

No: At this time, there is no evidence to suggest this. As one may imagine, few if any studies have been performed in humans to look for this. ...Read more

4

4
Can working with NMDA receptor antagonists cause psychosis?

Can working with NMDA receptor antagonists cause psychosis?

Working with?: The nmda receptor agents are a new and exciting arae in the treatment of psychotic disorders. When added to current therapies it can help. But these effects must be monitored by your doctor and therapist and family (if available to give feedback). Laboratory and industrial exposure may cause untoward CNS activation in workers. Most labs have saftey standards for safe use of chemical process. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
5

5
Why does dobutamine act on beta 1 receptor on renal vessels?

Why does dobutamine act on beta 1 receptor on renal vessels?

All over the body: Because doputamine acts on beta receptors all over the body. And Dobutamine is a partial vaso dilator, it decreases systemic vascular resistance, svr. It can mediate sympathetic nerve activity. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
6

6
What are GABA antagonists that lead to gaba-a receptor up-regulation?

What are GABA antagonists that lead to gaba-a receptor up-regulation?

Not safe: GABA antagonists are not routinely prescribed for GABA A receptor upregulation. The main one flumazenil (clonazepam) is used for overdoses from benzodiazepines in an ER setting. It may cause withdrawal seizures. Your best bet is to detox and enter a drug tx program for alcohol or sedative-hypnotic dependence issues. ...Read more

7

7
Is dopamine similar to dobutamine?

Is dopamine similar to dobutamine?

Yes and no: They are both catecholamines, a specific type of chemical class. In the body, there are different type of receptors in tissues which bind catechols with different effects. Dopamine and doubtamine have different affinities for different receptors and thus can have different effects. Kind of like different types of baking sugars...They are all sugars but are used for special purposes and functions. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
13

13
Only noradrenergic antidepressant works for me, does inderal (propranolol) acts negative on noradrenergic effects of antidepressant ?At vasomotor centers.Regards.

Only noradrenergic antidepressant works for me, does inderal (propranolol) acts negative on noradrenergic effects of antidepressant ?At vasomotor centers.Regards.

Venlafaxine: It's not the vasomotor centers that are important in antidepressant response; it's the neuron synapses in the brain. Effexor (venlafaxine) inhibits reuptake of both serotonin and ne. Inderal can suppress some of the physical symptoms of anxiety (rapid heart rate, sweaty palms, tremulousness, etc). Some on chronic (not intermittent or "prn") Inderal have had more depression. Not everyone. You should be okay. ...Read more

14

14
Will a GABA antagonist binded to the GABA receptors sites ever unbind ?

Yes.: Receptors are bound, unbound and replaced all the time. ...Read more

16

16
Is histamine excitatory or inhibitory?

Is histamine excitatory or inhibitory?

Excitatory: Histamine is actually classified as an excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain responsible for the sleep wake cycle. Too much of it can keep you awake. That is why it is used in many commercial sleep aides seen with the letters "pm" attached to some kind of pain killer. A common side-effect of a histamine blocker like Diphenhydramine (benadryl) is drowsiness. ...Read more

17

17
Side effects of angiotensin receptor blockers?

Side effects of angiotensin receptor blockers?

Generally : Well tolerated. Common side effects potentially include: dizziness, low blood pressure, headache, diarrhea, fatigue and elevated potassium to name a few. A serious side effect angioedema (swelling of throat/tongue etc) is relatively uncommon. ...Read more

18

18
Does naloxone block the body's placebo pain-lowering response?

Does naloxone block the body's placebo pain-lowering response?

Narcotic antsgonists: Naloxone is capable of blocking placebo response since both pain relievers such as morphine and endorphins from placebo both work on mu pain receptors. Naloxone is short acting, and usually administered I.V. And/or i.M. Naltrexone is an oral antagonist which works by a different mechanism. ...Read more

See 2 more doctor answers
19

19
Is stanozolol a beta receptor antagonist?

Stanozolol: Stanozolol is a synthetic anabolic steroid derived from testosterone. It is banned from use in athletes but has a role in some medical conditions. Please look up stanozolol in Wikipedia on the internet. ...Read more

20

20
Glutamine excitatory or inhbitory?

Both, indirectly: Glutamine is a major precursor of glutamate, the most potent excitatory neurotransmitter, & of gaba (gamma-aminobutyric acid), the most potent inhibitory neurotransmitter in mammalian brains. ...Read more

Dr. Elazer Edelman
313 doctors shared insights

Dobutamine (Definition)

Dobutamine is an inotrope which is a kind of heart ...Read more


Dr. Tiffanie Noonan
37 doctors shared insights

Dobutrex (Definition)

Dobutrex is an inotrope which is a kind of heart ...Read more