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Doctor insights on: Do People With Hypermobility Syndrome End Up With Arthritis

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I have POTS syndrome & hypermobility syndrome. All of muscles are weak. I have trouble pooping, controlling my bladder and bowel. No doctor knows why.

I have POTS syndrome & hypermobility syndrome. All of muscles are weak. I have trouble pooping, controlling my bladder and bowel. No doctor knows why.

Dysautonomia: 18y fem has "Hypermobility Syndrome, weak muscles, POTS, difficulty controlling bladder/bowel". Autonomic nerves are tethered at vertebral foramina & subluxing joints, especially sacroiliac joints, impinge these nerves arousing neural stimuli of smooth muscles of arteries, intestine & bladder. Dysautonomic effects manifest as patient describes. Many of these patients go on to develop Fibromyalgia. ...Read more

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Dr. Thomas Namey
2,350 doctors shared insights

Arthritis (Definition)

Arthritis is progressive degeneration of one or more joints. Symptoms may include joint pain, swelling, decreased motion, and stiffness. The two most common types of arthritis are osteoarthritis, which is associated first with articular cartilage breakdown with a component of inflammation, and rheumatoid arthritis, which is a systemic autoimmune disorder that affects joint linings first and secondarily ...Read more


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Do people with hypermobility syndrome end up with arthritis?

Do people with hypermobility syndrome end up with arthritis?

Yes: Eventually all of us end up with some degree of arthritis from normal wear and tear. People with hypermobility are at increased risk to develop arthritis sooner. It can help to work with a physical therapist to teach good body mechanics and give a home exercise program. ...Read more

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Do people with hypermobility syndrome end up having fractures?

Do people with hypermobility syndrome end up having fractures?

Yes, but....: Benign hypermobility joint syndrome (bhjs) is associated with increased risk for fracture. More often patients experience unexpected day time joint paint, night time awakenings, increases in overuse syndromes & dislocations. Patients may also suffer from low back pain, carpal tunnel syndrome or fibromyalgia. Of course the critical element in the diagnosis is hypermobility. ...Read more

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How can I address a benign hypermobility syndrome?

How can I address a benign hypermobility syndrome?

Exercise: Hyper-mobility usually is related to the supporting and connecting soft tissues. The only control we have short of surgical tightening procedures is to learn about our condition and regularly practice muscle stabilization exercises so that they will reinforce the loose ligaments, capsules, etc. See an experienced physical therapist who can outline a customized program. ...Read more

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Please help! I have hypermobility syndrome, what can I do?

Please help! I have hypermobility syndrome, what can I do?

Strength training: This condition features joints that easily move beyond normal range expected for a particular joint. It is estimated that 10%-15% of normal children have hypermobile joints or joints that can move beyond the normal range of motion. Typically a benign condition, but can be problematic during certain activities or sports. Strength training and bracing the affected joint can both be helpful. ...Read more

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What is the treatment for hypermobility syndrome?

Naturally: Question about the best treatment for Hypermobility Syndrome. This is a natural condition found mostly in females, and which benefits successful childbirth. Unfortunately, obesity, mechanical joint injuries, and childbirth can potentiate several chronic pain conditions & Fibromyalgia. See comments: ...Read more

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Can having hypermobility syndrome affect weight gain?

It should not.: There are different genetic gegrees of hypermobility syndrome. It might affect your weight if you are severely limited in your ability to engage in appropriate exercise due to your syndrome. Otherwise, i know of no direct relationship that would prevent you from choosing the right foods and portion sizes to encourage your "body" to lose weight. ...Read more

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Is slipping rib syndrome related to hypermobility syndrome in any way?

Possibly: Slipping rib syndrome is also known as tietze's syndrome. As like any joint, if you have increased flexibility, your ribs can easily move in and out of place as well. ...Read more

Dr. Robert Lowe
1,459 doctors shared insights

Painful Joints (Definition)

That term is not really a specific diagnosis, but rather somewhat of a general term. The medical term is arthralgias, which implies pain in multiple joint possibly coming from a single cause. Don't hesitate to be seen and evaluated for ...Read more


Dr. Laurence Badgley
219 doctors shared insights

Hypermobility Syndrome (Definition)

Hypermobility syndrome, also known as double-jointedness, is a condition with increased flexibility at one or several joints often leading to ...Read more