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Doctor insights on: Development Of A Fetus Fertilized Egg Organs Tissue Organ System

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When you subtract 2 weeks from the ga provided by an ultrasound, does that give you the estimated fertilisation age or the estimated fetal age?

When you subtract 2 weeks from the ga provided by an ultrasound, does that give you the estimated fertilisation age or the estimated fetal age?

Yes: When estimating gestational age by using an ultrasound scan, 2 weeks are added to the fetal age (the fetal age is the fertilisation age). ...Read more

Tissue (Definition)

The body is composed of tissue that are classically described as beiing derived from three basic embyonic layers known as the endoderm, mesoderm and ectoderm that then differentiate into the structures that compose the body such as skin, soft tissues, bone, muscle, organs, etc. Stem cells are not differentiated and have the potential to ...Read more


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Could anavar affect the fetus if I've taken 5 mg during ovulation/fertilization time but discontinued it couple days after?

Could anavar affect the fetus if I've taken 5 mg during ovulation/fertilization time but discontinued it couple days after?

Steroids: Please clarify the reason you are taking this medication with the doctor who has prescribed this medication for you. This is a potent male steroid so it is not typically given to women. Taking male hormones may interfere with ovulation. ...Read more

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How do an egg cell and a sperm cell develop into a fetus inside the uterus?

How do an egg cell and a sperm cell develop into a fetus inside the uterus?

Conception: Sperm enter vagina in semen & then pass thru cervix, pass thru uterus into fallopian tube containing ovum or egg after ovulation. 1 sperm pierces thru membrane covering ovum & nucleus of sperm fuses with nucleus of ovum. This fertilized ovum now divides from 1 cell to 2 then 4 & so on.Now an embryo, transfers to body of uterus. Stem cells, within embryo divide, now a fetus develop various tissues ...Read more

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How long is a egg available for fertilization?( how many hours or days )

How long is a egg available for fertilization?( how many hours or days )

Short: 12 to 24 hours is the time period that an egg can be fertilized after ovulation. ...Read more

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If intercourse is had on june 9th, is it possible to live until june 18th to fertilize an egg?

If intercourse is had on june 9th, is it possible to live until june 18th to fertilize an egg?

In the big scheme...: In the big scheme of the universe, maybe anything is possible. Most people feel that sperm can survive 3 days inside a woman. Some people believe that under good circumstances, sperm might survive 5 days max. However, if you know you had sex on june 9 and you somehow proved you didn't ovulate until june 18 and became pregnant, then you are truly special for keeping one or more sperm alive >8 days. ...Read more

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If I'm not ovulating and I have unprotected sex is it okay if he cums inside me since there is no egg to fertilize ?

If I'm not ovulating and I have unprotected sex is it okay if he cums inside me since there is no egg to fertilize ?

Not necessarily: Sperm can survive up to 6 days, so even though you are not ovulating now, you are at risk if it happens sometime in the next week. It is unlikely that you can be certain that will not happen. Don't take chances unless it will be OK if you get pregnant. ...Read more

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Isn't 2% of sperm penetration for in vitro fertilization fine since there are millions of sperm and 1 egg?

Isn't 2% of sperm penetration for in vitro fertilization fine since there are millions of sperm and 1 egg?

Maybe: When we evaluate sperm , information can be used in certain ways, we can categorize sperm as normal, mildly abnormal or severely abnormal. We have some idea of how each parameter matters, but certain aspects are not understood . With significant abnormalities, sometimes the sperm just do not function as well, or sometimes the sperm may have genetic abnormalities and the effect goes beyond the #. ...Read more