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Doctor insights on: Decompensated Cirrhosis

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Can decompensated cirrhosis be seen on imaging?

Can decompensated cirrhosis be seen on imaging?

Depends: It depends on your definition of decompensated cirrhosis, since cirrhosis itself is a de-compensated condition by definition. Liver function tests (blood draw), ultrasound, and specific types of scans (fibroscan, MRI, CT) can add to the picture. See you internal medicine doc for more specific info, or contact us here at HealthTap for a live consultation ...Read more

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I have decompensated cirrhosis. How long to live?

I have decompensated cirrhosis. How long to live?

Cirrhosis: Cirrhosis is an end-stage liver condition that affects many aspect of liver function. Although the longevity is adversely affected, it is hard to define exact expected survival. Here is more on cirrhosis: http://www. Laendo. Net/english/cirrhosis-58020983. ...Read more

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I am in decompensated cirrhosis with ascites present in liver area in the past. Yet my blood counts are within normal range. Is this possible?

I am in decompensated cirrhosis with ascites present in liver area in the past. Yet my blood counts are within normal range. Is this possible?

Yes: Ascites can be a primary manifestation of liver disease despite what appear to be well preserved blood values. In some cases, we will consider a tipps procedure to control the ascites as long as you are not struggling with episodes of confusion. Make sure you are following a low sodium diet. ...Read more

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Sorafenib decreased platelet count of my father at 72 who's diabetic, diagnosed with hcc & decompensated liver cirrhosis & now unable to take sorafenib?

Sorafenib decreased platelet count of my father at 72 who's diabetic, diagnosed with hcc & decompensated liver cirrhosis & now unable to take sorafenib?

My friend,: ..You paint a very bleak picture. Your dad is elderly and his bad cirrhosis makes it likely that any treatment for his hcc will cause more harm than good. I would respectfully suggest that you guys start focusing on confort measures rather than additional therapy. Of course, I do not know all the details so this is a conversation to have with his treating oncologist. Best to both. ...Read more

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Would a contrast CT scan with barium swallow pick up decompensated liver cirrhosis?

Would a contrast CT scan with barium swallow pick up decompensated liver cirrhosis?

It should: Oral contrast and intravenous contrast is needed to evaluate if there's compensation of the liver. Ultrasound also can show blood flow direction to further help in evaluating the liver ...Read more

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Can a decompensated liver from cirrhosis ever return to a compensated state? I've heard varying answers!

Yes.: Not uncommon to have varying answers. Cirrhosis is scar and does not improve. However, function may improve slightly and the addition of medications could turn a decompensated state into a compensated state. ...Read more

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I'm confused! I have cirrhosis & had symptoms of decompensation. Can you go from decompensated back to compensated? One dr said yes. Another said no!

I'm confused! I have cirrhosis & had symptoms of decompensation. Can you go from decompensated back to compensated? One dr said yes. Another said no!

Cirrhosis: Cirrhosis an end stage condition of the liver is usually not reversible. Unless the initial diagnosis was incorrect, it is unlikely to be reversible without a liver transplant. ...Read more

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Does alcoholic cirrhosis present/look differently from other cirrhosis causes? Is it more difficult to diagnose? I mean decompensated not compensated

Does alcoholic cirrhosis present/look differently from other cirrhosis causes? Is it more difficult to diagnose? I mean decompensated not compensated

Diagnosed on history: One factor that makes it subtle is that the liver enzymes reflect only recent drinking, fibrosis reflects long-term drinking. So it may be overdiagnosed or missed. When it decomensates, the patient will know and testing may even be moot. ...Read more

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I have cirrhosis and I'm decompensated. When I visit my gastroenterologist the nurse never takes my BP or temp. Is this good practice?

I have cirrhosis and I'm decompensated. When I visit my gastroenterologist the nurse never takes my BP or temp. Is this good practice?

?: A complete set of vital signs includes a blood pressure and temp. A patient with cirrhosis can be susceptible to infections so its ok to ask for a reading ask if you don't feel good. ...Read more

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I have cirrhosis and I'm decompensated. In a recent blood test my amonia level was 33. Should I be concerned or satisdied with this result?

Amonia: 33 doesn't appear to be very high, but it doesn't mean much, as some folks whose ammonia level is chronically elevated are able to tolerate it ok, whereas others who are not used to it, will not. Also, ammonia level tends to fluctuate and a spot check of 33 doesn't mean it's not changed since and is not higher now. ...Read more

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Does the presence of ascites in cirrhosis always indicate the patient is in a decompensated state?

Does the presence of ascites in cirrhosis always indicate the patient is in a decompensated state?

Not exactly: It indicates the severity of disease process, but can be created at variable rate (/volume) depending on compliance w/meds and diet (salt excess a big one). True decompensation usually w/ascites and jaundice (yellow appearance to skin / sclera). ...Read more

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In cirrhosis if you have experienced decompensation e.G. Ascites. Can you go from decompensated back to a compensated stage? I'm confused on this pt!

In cirrhosis if you have experienced decompensation e.G. Ascites. Can you go from decompensated back to a compensated stage? I'm confused on this pt!

Uncommon but possibl: Cirrhosis is scarring of the liver due to persistent injury. The causes of cirrhosis are multiple, including alcohol, obesity, viral hepatitis, autoimmune diseases. Decompensation means that there are significant complications, such as ascites, jaundice, confusion, kidney failure and cancer. In rare cases where the cause is removed, the liver can recover. I recommend you to see a hepatologist. ...Read more

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I have cirrhosis and am experiencing both right and left flank pain. I am decompensated. Is this pain associated with the disease?

I have cirrhosis and am experiencing both right and left flank pain. I am decompensated. Is this pain associated with the disease?

Possibly: Two common things that could cause bilateral flank pain in decompensated cirrhosis are ascities and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (sbp). The latter is a more pressing concern and usually presents with fevers/chills, but not always, and requires medical attention as soon as possible. ...Read more

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I have alcoholic cirrhosis and am decompensated. I haven't drank alcohol in 5 yrs. My blood counts are normal. How is this possible?

Progressive disease: Historically, cirrhosis has been a progressive disease; once it's present, it can get worse even after medication is stopped. You may also have something else going on -- metabolic syndrome, iron overload, antitrypsin deficiency, or an allergy to one of your medications. I'm very pleased you were able to stop the alcohol -- this did save your life or at least give extra good time. ...Read more

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What is cirrhosis?

Liver damage: It means the liver is completely scarred. There are many causes of cirrhosis, and it is irreversible. ...Read more

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Who gets cirrhosis?

Liver cirrhosis: Liver cirrhosis has many reasons. Most common in the us are alcohol abuse, and hepatitis c. Other causes could be due to wilson's disease, alfa veto protein deficiency etc. ...Read more

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What causes cirrhosis?

What causes cirrhosis?

Most common alcohol: Most common cause of cirrhosis is alcohol. Other causes included virsus such as hepatitis. There is also non alcoholic casuse aka nash. Other causes include billiary cirrhosis where bile backs up in the liver. Overall the liver eventually becomes fibrotic and no longer functions. This in itself leads to many other problems. ...Read more

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Is cirrhosis terminal?

Is cirrhosis terminal?

Need more info: Cirrhosis can be "compensated" or decompensated-- like fluid build up in your abdominal cavity (ascites), confusion (hepatic encephalopathy), bleeding varices, liver cancer (hcc). You could have easy bruising, fatigue and jaundice (elevated bilirubin) as well. With some of the above, life expectancy can be lower, but transplant can fix this! See a liver doctor who can discuss the above with you. ...Read more

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What are signs of cirrhosis?

What are signs of cirrhosis?

Signs of Cirrhosis: There are many "signs" or physical findings of cirrhosis. These include: spider angiomata (small spider like blood vessels on the skin, see picture), clubbing of the fingers, palmar erythema (reddening of the palms), gynecomastia (enlargement of the breasts in males), enlargement of the liver and spleen, ascites (accumulation of fluid in the abdomen), jaundice (yellowing of skin) and many more. ...Read more

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How do you define cirrhosis?

How do you define cirrhosis?

Scarring of liver: Damage of liver cells followed by scarring and haphazard/unorganised regrowth of liver cells. May cause multiple complications. ...Read more

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Can somebody survive cirrhosis?

For how long?: Cirrhosis is irreversible liver disease, though it may remain in a compensated state for a few years. It also depends on the cause of cirrhosis and associated pathology. See this site for more info.
http://www. Webmd. Com/digestive-disorders/cirrhosis-liver. ...Read more

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What sort of disease is cirrhosis?

What sort of disease is cirrhosis?

Scarred Liver: Liver damage and scarring of the liver from a variety of causes results in what is called cirrhosis of the liver. Alcohol, viral hepatitis, autoimmune liver diseases, inheritedliver disease are some examples of causes of cirrhosis. ...Read more

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How will cirrhosis affect the body?

How will cirrhosis affect the body?

Liver failure: Liver produces a large number of proteins, lipids and metabolizes a large number of chemicals, drugs and normal blood constituents. Cirrhosis affects both cellular function and circulation through the liver. The effects are edema, bleeding in the GI tract, fluid in the belly that may get infected, development of cancer in cirrhotic liver etc. ...Read more

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What are the signs of end stage cirrhosis?

What are the signs of end stage cirrhosis?

Variable: Gi bleeding, abdominal swelling, edema, encephalopathy, wasting etc. See this site for more info.
http://www. Webmd. Com/digestive-disorders/cirrhosis-liver. ...Read more

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What are the primary symptoms of cirrhosis?

What are the primary symptoms of cirrhosis?

Can vary: Cirrhosis can be asymptomatic in some but in others symptoms of decreased appetite, fatigue, feeling sleepy or confused (hepatic encephalopathy) can occur. Your liver doctor can help manage and control the above symptoms as they occur at different rates. ...Read more

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What exactly does cirrhosis do to the body?

What exactly does cirrhosis do to the body?

Many things: The liver has many functions, both anatomically and physiologically. When these are interrupted the results can be devastating. Increased pressures, particularly in the portal venous system can create ascites, esophageal and other varices, hormonal changes because of lack of detoxification of estrogen or production of multiple products like albumin, etc. Can create feminization, etc. ...Read more

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How many years you can live with cirrhosis?

How many years you can live with cirrhosis?

It depends...: The cause of liver cirrhosis has a lot to do with the answer to your question. Patients may live for many years with proper treatment and monitoring. However, there are fulminant forms of cirrhosis for which life expectancy without a transplant is weeks, months at best. Proper diagnosis and evaluation will chart the course for both treatment and prognosis. ...Read more

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What are the symptoms of cirrhosis in a man?

Variable: Unless advanced-no obvious signs may be apparent
advanced disease will produce signs & symptom of liver dysfunction-ascites, jaundice, encepohalopathy & variceal bleeding. ...Read more

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Do you have to be a drinker to get cirrhosis?

No: Alcohol is only one cause, and in the us has now moved into 2nd place to chronic hepatitis c. However, the combination of alcohol and hep c makes cirrhosis come earlier and in a more destructive form. Worldwide, hepatitis b is the most common cause. There are other causes as well - wilson's disease (hereditary), autoimmune hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis and recently, obesity with fatty liver. ...Read more