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Doctor insights on: Current Mammogram Recommendations

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Current recommendations for breast cancer screening?

Current recommendations for breast cancer screening?

Awareness: For you few years from now regular breast examination by the physician, monthly self examination, annual mammography , if needed sonography, some times mri, core needle biopsy of suspicious dencities. Genetic study ( braca i & ii ) if there is strong family history. ...Read more

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Dr. Barry Rosen
667 doctors shared insights

Mammogram (Definition)

A mammogram is the "gold standard" screening test for breast cancer. It's well established that yearly 'grams will DX cancers well before they are palpable, leading to earlier diagnoses and saved lives. All experts agree to begin yearly mammograms by age 50; many (including myself) believe the pro's outweigh the con's to begin at 40. Regrettably, less than half of all women ...Read more


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Current STD screening recommendations?

Current STD screening recommendations?

Risk-based: Talk to your healthcare provider about specific concerns! in general, if you are a woman under 25, test for gonorrhea and chlamydia each year, and over 25 if you have new partners or multiple partners. Hiv/syphilis/hepatitis testing if you have another std, have had more than one partner since your last test, or use injection drugs. Pap tests every other year (age 21-30) or every three (age 30-64). ...Read more

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Screening for breast cancer--need latest us recommendations and rationale?

Screening for breast cancer--need latest us recommendations and rationale?

Awareness: Form age 35 (in suspicious group ) to 40 yrs and on regular breast examination by the physician, monthly self examination, annual mammography , if needed sonography, some times mri, core needle biopsy of suspicious dencities. Genetic study ( braca i & ii ) if there is strong family history. ...Read more

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What are the current mammogram recommendations to prevent breast cancer?

What are the current mammogram recommendations to prevent  breast cancer?

Variable: Most us radiographic and oncologic groups recommend annual screening beginning at age 40. (continuing as long as life expectancy exceeds 10 years.) european groups point out the lower likelihood of breast cancer in young women and the higher false positive rate and recommend later, and less frequent screenings. Obviously - a strong family history may change your personal recommendation. ...Read more

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Rules keep changing. What is latest recommendation for mammograms?

Rules keep changing. What is latest recommendation for mammograms?

Annual after 40: This is a world wide challenge which is constantly evaluated . American college of radiology and american cancer society and others recommend baseline study around the age of 35-40 and then annual mammograms after 40 . I think what may change is how often in the later postmenopausal years. There has been some recent controversy about women between 40 and 50 but that controversy has been put down. ...Read more

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What is the latest recommendation for breast mammography?

What is the latest recommendation for breast mammography?

Age 40: The recommendation is yearly mammograms starting at age 40 unless you have a family history of breast cancer or ovarian cancer than you should visit with a breast specialist to determine the most effective screening plan for you. ...Read more

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With differing mammogram guidelines, I'm not sure when to begin mammogram screening. What does Mayo Clinic recommend?

With differing mammogram guidelines, I'm not sure when to begin mammogram screening. What does Mayo Clinic recommend?

At Mayo Clinic, doctors offer mammograms to women beginning at age 40 and continuing annually: When to begin mammogram screening and how often to repeat it is a personal decision based on your preferences. Mayo Clinic recommends women and their doctors discuss the benefits, risks and limitations of mammograms and decide together what is best. Balancing the benefits of screening with the limitations and risks is a key part of deciding when to begin mammograms and how often to repeat them. Not all organizations agree on breast cancer screening guidelines, but most emphasize working with your doctor to determine what's right for your particular situation. For instance, the U. S. Preventive Services Task Force mammogram guidelines recommend women begin screening at age 50 and the American Cancer Society recommends women begin screening at age 45. But both of these organizations acknowledge that beginning screening at 40 may make sense for some women after considering the benefits and limitations of the test. Mayo Clinic doctors continue to review studies about mammogram guidelines to understand what the studies mean for women's health. Changes to mammogram guidelines might or might not be necessary in the future, as researchers continue studying this topic. Mayo Clinic supports screening beginning at age 40 because screening mammograms can detect breast abnormalities early in women in their 40s. Findings from randomized trials of women in their 40s and 50s have demonstrated that screening mammograms decrease breast cancer deaths by 15 to 29 percent. But mammogram screening isn't perfect. Another study concluded that despite more women being diagnosed with early breast cancer due to mammogram screening, the number of women diagnosed with advanced breast cancer hasn't decreased. The study suggested that some women with early breast cancer were diagnosed with cancer that may never have affected their health. Unfortunately doctors can't distinguish dangerous breast cancers from those that are non-life-threatening, so annual mammograms remain the best option for detecting cancer early and reducing the risk of death from breast cancer. The main concern about mammograms for breast cancer screening is the chance of a false positive result. This means that an abnormality is detected but, after additional testing, it turns out to not be cancer. This is especially a concern in younger women in their 40s and 50s, who may be more likely to have a false positive result. If an abnormality is detected on a mammogram, a woman may be asked to have additional mammogram images taken and, possibly, additional imaging tests, such as ultrasound. These tests may determine the abnormality shown on the original mammogram isn't cancer. In some cases, it may be necessary for a woman to undergo a biopsy procedure to remove a sample of breast tissue for testing. For many women, having a biopsy that confirms there isn't any cancer present is reassuring and doesn't increase anxiety. If you're concerned about when to start breast cancer screening and how often to repeat it, work with your doctor to make an informed decision. Together you can decide what's best for you based on your personal preferences, your medical history and your individual breast cancer risk. Talk with your doctor about: Your personal risk of breast cancer, The benefits, risks and limitations of screening mammograms, The role of breast self-exams for breast awareness in helping you become more familiar with your breasts, which may help you identify abnormalities or changes. ...Read more

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Is there any agreed upon guidelines for psa screening?

Is there any agreed upon guidelines for psa screening?

USPSTF: No agreement, but the US Preventive Services Task Force publishes a synthesis of the data and recommendations based upon prevailing evidence. http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/prostatecancerscreening.htm ...Read more

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What are the current recommendations regarding pelvic exercises?

What are the current recommendations regarding pelvic exercises?

Where? When? How?: So unless there something inappropriate about how you do them or where you do them (like while driving), then doing kegel exercises whenever you remember is ok. If you don't notice results after a period of time then you see a professional like urologist or behavior therapist. ...Read more

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Are the asbergers free screening exams online considered reputable in regards to recommending further testing?

Depends: Screening tools are, by definition, meant to miss few possible candidates, which means that they often are oversensitive, so pick up people who are just fine as well as those with problems. If you or your child is having chronic, impairing social difficulties and one of the screens seems to suggest asperger's disorder as a possibility, it would not be unreasonable to seek further evaluation. ...Read more

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What are the new prostate cancer screening recommendations?

What are the new prostate cancer screening recommendations?

Not recommended: According to the us preventive services task force, routine screening for prostate cancer with the psa blood test is not recommended. Do still report symptoms.There is very little if any benefit and lots of possible harm from unnecessary treatments. Here is a link with the rationale: http://www.Provenhealthways.Com/prostate-cancer-screening-the-real-numbers/. ...Read more

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Detecting breast cancer appropriate to have thermography for women vs mammogram?

Detecting breast cancer appropriate to have thermography for women vs mammogram?

The use of: mammography as a screening test has been validated by many years of outcomes data. Thermography, not so much. ...Read more

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Does the mammography technician ask questions?

Does the mammography technician ask questions?

Yes: She may go over your breast health history, for example if you have had a prior biopsy, and your family history of breast cancer. She may ask when and where you had previous mammograms. Also she will verify your identity. ...Read more

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Mammogram, ct, MRI and ultrasound tests for breast cancer - what is best?

Mammogram, ct, MRI and ultrasound tests for breast cancer - what is best?

Situational: For screening: mammograms are the most valuable. For diagnosis (palpable mass, mammographic density): ultrasound can be very helpful. Mris are the most sensitive test for breast cancer, but their prohibitive cost makes this unaffordable for large-population screening. It is best used in high-risk patients, those with very dense breast tissue, and for evaluating the extent of a known breast cancer. ...Read more

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Some alternatives to mammograms for breast screening.

None: At present there are no definite good alternatives to mammograms for breast screening. Ultrasound and MRI are complimentary to mammograms but do not replace mammograms. Specifically microcalcifications are best seen on mammograms which have resolution of up to 70 microns. There are some advertised screening alternatives but none are as tried and true as mammograms. ...Read more

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Palliative care question: good reference guideline for end-stage COPD clinical/functional markers for poor response to CPR, and should recommend DNR?

Palliative care question: good reference guideline for end-stage COPD clinical/functional markers for poor response to CPR, and should recommend DNR?

COPD and DNR: I recommend going to uptodate and review what their recommendations are. This is the best source of good medical information I have found. When you read the sections on these issues you can also click on the reference to see the cited reference. ...Read more

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What immunizations would a non-invasive cardiovascular technologist need?

What immunizations would a non-invasive cardiovascular technologist need?

Flu: An annual flu vaccine. Also is beneficial for people that are hospital staff to have hepatitis b vaccination. The osha department and your particular facility provide details about this. ...Read more