Top
20
Doctor insights on: Cta Aorta And Bilateral Iliofemoral Runoff

Share
1

1
Why is a cta abdominal aorta and bilateral iliofemoral runoff performed?

Why is a cta abdominal aorta and bilateral iliofemoral runoff performed?

See answer: Usually to evaluate for leg pain with a suspected vascular etiology. Abnormal blockages / occlusions and stenosis / narrowings might be detected. ...Read more

Aorta (Definition)

The aorta is the largest artery in the body, leaving directly from the left ventricle of the heart to supply blood to the entire body. It is made of elastic tissue layers called "intima" and is subject to damage by high blood pressure, smoking, cholesterol, ...Read more


2

2
When measuring ascending aorta size (horiz)from sinotobular junction to innominate artery is cardiac mri/mra for morphology more accurate test than cta?

When measuring ascending aorta size (horiz)from sinotobular junction to innominate artery is cardiac mri/mra for morphology more accurate test than cta?

Depends: Done properly, ideally with ECG gating, an aortic MRA is equivalent to an aortic CTA. The opinion from some vascular docs is an overestimation on MRA. This was probably from movement artifact and older scanners. The benefit of MRA is the lack of iodinated contrast and lack of radiation. It is in routine use at many large medical facilities to periodically track aortic enlargement- kids/adults ...Read more

3

3
If mra showed abi on right dorsalis pedis is zero before surgery should doctor freak out after aortic bypass surgery o again then he does a r ileofemarol thrombolectomy and a intraoperative angiogram and a r distal pop-tibial exposure then a r greater sap

If mra showed abi on right dorsalis pedis is zero before surgery should doctor freak out after aortic bypass surgery o again then he does a r ileofemarol thrombolectomy and a intraoperative angiogram and a r distal pop-tibial exposure then a r greater sap

I: I believe that you also asked this question elsewhere, so escuse me if the first part of my answer is a repeat.

The ankle-brachial index (abi) is a screening test done with blood pressure cuffs and an ultrasound probe. An mra, in contrast, uses magnetic fields and injected dye to directly visualize the anatomy of the blood vessels. Therefore, while an mra might show a blocked dorsalis pedis artery, it would not be reported as showing an abi of zero.

The abi tests blood pressure in the dorsalis pedis and the posterior tibial arteries and compares those measurements to blood pressures in the arms. If the pressures in the feet are significantly lower than those in the arms, and/or the patient has clinical signs of decreased blood flow to the feet, then one may decide to intervene.

It sounds to me like you had no pulse in your dorsais pedis artery before your surgery, regardless of what your abi might have been. This could have happened because of chronic blockage or because of new clot that might have formed a) because of decreased flow in an already-diseased dorsalis pedis or b) because of clot that came from abnormal vessels upstream. You had an aortic bypass, so there certainly was disease upstream.

It sounds to me like your surgery was a difficult one. However, it's hard to know whether your doctor was fixing problems that were caused by the surgery or whether you just had a lot of disease to begin with and he or she was trying to fix a of of problems at the same time. Unfortunately, a lot of people with bad arterial disease wind up in a wheelchair or with amputations despite the best efforts of good doctors. Still, if you think your doctor made a mistake, you should certainly talk it over with him or her and consider seeing another doctor for a second opinion. ...Read more

4

4
Friend has had cerebellar infarction, MRI is: pundate hyperintense area in bilateral inf. Cereblr region, hypointense on t1, hyperintense on t2, retriction on div I s/o aorta enfarct. Best treatment?

Friend has had cerebellar infarction, MRI is: pundate hyperintense area in bilateral inf. Cereblr region, hypointense on t1, hyperintense on t2, retriction on div I s/o aorta enfarct. Best treatment?

Time: This means the tissue has recently died in small areas (punctate) of the cerebellum. It is hard to tell (without examining, watching the changes, and knowing the history) to predict the outcome. ...Read more

5

5
31/m c/o bilateral sharp CP x 6 mos., no known cause. Recent cta, ekgs, holter, echo, MRI chest, CT head are all negative. No prior history of any kind.?

31/m c/o bilateral sharp CP x 6 mos., no known cause. Recent cta, ekgs, holter, echo, MRI chest, CT head are all negative. No prior history of any kind.?

Noncardiacchest pain: Since cardiac origins have been ruled out, most likely musculoskeletal. Can u reproduce the pain by pressing on the sore spots? Is pain along edges of sternum or at junction of rib bone with cartilage? May be costochondritis (inflammation of the above sites). Moist heat to areas as well as nsaids as directed should help. If bodybuilding, go easier on chest routines. ...Read more

7

7
What does atheromatous aorta mean medically?

Cholesterol plaque: It means the aorta has some cholesterol plaques on it. When noted on a x-ray or ct scan, this typically means that some calcified plaques are present on the films. Usually this is managed through cholesterol medication. ...Read more

8

8
Could I survive a knife stab through the aorta?

Could I survive a knife stab through the aorta?

Through the: Actual aorta - very unlikely. If you are having
thoughts about killing yourself, get seen at the nearest emergency room now. Have a friend or relative drive you or call 911 for emergency services for transport. You can call the national suicide hotlines 24/7 at 1-800-suicide (1-800-784-2433) or 1-800-273 – talk (1-800-273-8255) for support. ...Read more

10

10
Please tell me what does atheromatous aorta mean?

Please tell me what does atheromatous aorta mean?

ATHEROMATOUS AORTA: This means there are atheromatous changes seen on an imaging study which shows these changes in the aorta. It means the patient has atherosclerotic vascular disease. ...Read more

11

11
How can you measure aorta size?

How can you measure aorta size?

Ultrasound, but...: The two primary ways we measure the aorta is by ultrasound or ct scanning. Each modality has its pros and cons. While ultrasound is the preferred screening and first-line method of aortic imaging, one caveat to keep in mind is that it does tend to overestimate the size of the abdominal aorta and it is not practical for imaging of the thoracic aorta. Ct is more accurate though not cost-effective. ...Read more

12

12
Is a cyst on the aorta dangerous?

Is a cyst on the aorta dangerous?

Check with your doc: Typically the aorta does not develop cysts. The aorta, or main blood vessel leading from the heart to the neck, arms and abdomen / legs can develop an aneurysm or enlargement. This is not normal and can be dangerous if it gets too large.
There are several ways to image the aorta depending on what part of the body is involved including ultrasounds and ct scans. ...Read more

14

14
Tortuous aorta symptoms?

Aorta: A tortuous aorta may have no symptoms. If there are symptoms they generally relate to obstructed blood flow related to the tortuosity. The symptom would depend on what wasn't getting good flow or perhaps some compression caused in adjacent organ by the tortuosity. ...Read more

15

15
How bad is a dilated aorta?

How dilated?: Depends on how dilated the aorta is. If you are talking about the infra-renal aorta, than anything above 5cm is worrisome in men and >4.5cm in women. If you are talking about the thoracic aorta than anything greater than 6cm is worrisome. What are we worried about? Rupture. ...Read more

16

16
Can you cure coarctation of the aorta?

Can you cure coarctation of the aorta?

Can Correct: No congenital heart disease can be "cured". We can fully correct some types though, and coarctation is one of those. But we can never make the heart/vessel the same as if the lesion never occurred (which is the definition of cure). Again, semantic but important point because anyone with coarctation should have life-long follow-up with a cardiologist. ...Read more

17

17
What does coarctation of the aorta mean?

Congenital defect: It is a narrowing of the aorta, the major blood vessel that branches off your heart and delivers blood to your body. It is usually congenital, and may range from mild to severe. Surgery may be required as a newborn if critical. It may not be detected until older, depending on severity. It often occurs along with other heart defects. It requires surgery or catheter balloon and/or stenting. ...Read more

18

18
What does tortuous calcified aorta mean?

Arteriosclerosis: This is the radiographic hallmark of arterioscleroisis as seen on a chest x-ray. It would be most unusual in a 38 year old so I assume this doesn't apply to you? ...Read more

19

19
What are the symptoms of a tortuous aorta?

What are the symptoms of a tortuous aorta?

Tortuosity aorta: Usually has no symptoms specific to tortuosity. ...Read more

20

20
When is coarctation of the aorta a problem?

Depends: It depends on whether it is severe enough to cause symptoms or other health problems like hypertension. A very, very mild coarctation may not cause any problems (though this is rare). So it become a problem when it becomes a problem. For some, this occurs in infancy while others make only develop problems as an adult. ...Read more

Cta (Definition)

Computed tomography angiography. Specialized contrast enhanced CT technique that visualizes the blood vessels. Can simulate a traditional angiogram without ...Read more