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Doctor insights on: Cranial Arteritis Treatment

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Treatment for chronic demyelinating brain disease?

Treatment for chronic demyelinating brain disease?

Drugs exist: Previous answer on stress reduction which is really important.However, medications exist that can help too. It does depend on which demyelinating problem (ms, cdip), and what type as some treatments are more indicated for certain kinds of ms for example.Many are powerful immune-modulating drugs, and can be by mouth, shot or IV depending. Best to see someone skilled in treatment, such as neurologist. ...Read more

Dr. Bruce Rothschild
241 doctors shared insights

Arteritis (Definition)

Arteritis is inflammation of the blood vessels or arteries. This may be triggered by viruses, medications, or by your own immune system leading to what is called an autoimmune disease. There are several different forms that mainly depends on the size of the blood vessel that is involved. There are several treatment options. This is an area of specialty handled by a rheumatologist. I am happy to do ...Read more


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Treatment for sixth nerve palsy?

Treatment for sixth nerve palsy?

Determine cause: The sixth nerve can be affected by many disorders of the nervous system. The cause must be determined. Many cases improve with time as long as the cause is not tumor or other mass. Surgery and glasses do not help. ...Read more

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What is cranial neuritis?

What is cranial neuritis?

Inflammation: Neuritis is a word used by physicians to explain pain and inflammation of a nerve. Cranial neuritis usually applies to a nerve exiting the skull which is specifically inflamed or painful. ...Read more

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Takayasu arteritis--causes and cures?

Takayasu arteritis--causes and cures?

Steroids or surgery: Prednisone/ steroids are the main way of treatment . Some patients will require open bypass surgery in case of steroid resistance . Causes are idiopathic or unknown .. It is an autoimmune disease affecting the wall of large blood vessels causing narrowing by fibrosis. ...Read more

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Is there a specific arteritis called carotid arteritis?

Is there a specific arteritis called carotid  arteritis?

Problem vs. Location: -itis at end of medical descriptive word means inflamation. Thus, arteritis: inflamation of artery, by any mechanism. Carotid: the larger arteries in our neck; supply blood to our brain & face. The inflammatory cells are our white blood cells. Usual dominant arterial disease is an accumulation of wbcs in the walls of arteries, typically starting childhood, thus inflamation. There are other forms. ...Read more

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A trigeminal neuralgia treated with radiofrecuency and present, there is another treatment ?

A trigeminal neuralgia treated with radiofrecuency and present, there is another treatment ?

Yes.: Medication management is often sufficient to treat trigeminal neuralgia and should be used as a first-line treatment. When this fails other invasive treatments can be tried such as radiofrequency lesioning or a gamma knife procedure. ...Read more

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Enlarged perivascular space in basal ganglia. Is by any cranial nerves? Double vision, enlarged pupils, trigeminal neuralgia, pulsating tinnitus

Enlarged perivascular space in basal ganglia. Is by any cranial nerves? Double vision, enlarged pupils, trigeminal neuralgia, pulsating tinnitus

Neurologic issues: None of what you describe is normal. I would suggest that you seek the opinion of both the Neurologist and the Neurosurgeon and possibly the Interventional Neuroradiologist. ...Read more

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What is the long-term outlook for polymyalgia rheumatica and temporal arteritis?

What is the long-term outlook for polymyalgia rheumatica and temporal arteritis?

Good: If treated correctly and before there is vascular damage (e.G vision loss) from gca, usually they go away after a few years of treatment with minimal residual consequences (mostly from the steroids used to treat). ...Read more

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What is the treatment for vertebro basilar stroke?

What is the treatment for vertebro basilar stroke?

Up to 24 hours: Tpa (alteplase) can be used by vein up to 3 hours ( some patients 4.5 hours ) after onset of stroke symptoms. Tpa (alteplase) in the artery can be used up to 6 hours after onset ( up to 24 hours in basilar artery ). See stroke.Org. ...Read more

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What are non-surgical treatments for trigeminal neuralgia?

Trigeminal neuralgia: There are a number of medications available that treat TN in addition the Gamma Knife, a radiation source has also been added to the treatment protocols. ...Read more

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What would be your choice of treatment for migraines, fibromyalgia, cervical stenosis, degerative disc and joint disease, TMJ & myofacial combined.

What would be your choice of treatment for migraines, fibromyalgia, cervical stenosis, degerative disc and joint disease, TMJ & myofacial combined.

Variable: There is no single medication which will provide significant relief for all of these disorders; you should see your pcp for this complex dilemma. A good starting point for therapy is non-steroidal anti-inflammatories, like aleve. Add to that a general neuropathy rx like lyrica (pregabalin). Each case and response to therapy is different -- see your doctor. ...Read more

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Who diagnoses temple arteritis?

Who diagnoses temple arteritis?

Temporal arteritis: either an ophthalmologist, neurologist, primary care physician. Often they will ask a surgeon to do a temporal artery biopsy, but if the diagnosis is highly suspicious then steroids treatment would be recommended. ...Read more

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What is temporal arteritis?

What is temporal arteritis?

Inflammation: Temporal arteritis (ta) is a non-infectious inflammation of the temporal arteries, ususally seen in individuals over 50 yrs. Headache or head pains are the most common complaint, associated with tender temporal arteries. Other symptoms include jaw claudication, anorexia, fever, anemia and elevated wbc. An elevated sedimentation rate(esr) is typically above 80mm/hr, but ta can occur with normal esr. ...Read more

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What is temporal arteritis?

Artery inflammation: Also known as "giant cell arteritis" is an auto-immune disease characterized by inflammation of the vessels of the head and neck. Its cause is unknown. It is more common in women and usually is seen in the elderly. Definitive diagnosis requires removal of a portion of the superficial temporal artery and examination under a microscope looking for "giant cells" that are damaging the arteries. ...Read more

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How are polymyalgia rheumatica and giant cell arteritis diagnosed?

Overlapping: They are overlapping disorders. They can occur separately or together. Clinical experience of the doctor and elevated erythrocyte sedimentationrate are the most reliable findings. ...Read more

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What's the difference between strabismus & cranial nerve palsies that effect the eyes? Can cranial nerve palsies cause strabismus?

What's the difference between strabismus & cranial nerve palsies that effect the eyes? Can cranial nerve palsies cause strabismus?

Different patterns: Strabismus is the generic term for eye misalignment of any cause. If from childhood, the eyes are separated about the same in all positions. If from cranial palsy, the degree of separation goes from normal away from the action of the muscles, to a very wide difference in the direction of the action of that muscle. An ophthalmologist can usually readily make this distinction. ...Read more