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Doctor insights on: Corynebacterium Minutissimum

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Doctors, what is the difference between bacillus cereus, bacillus subtilis, and bacillus licheniformis?

Different species: These are different species in the genus bacillus. Anthrax bacillus is also in the same genus. You may Google each term to learn about their characteristics. ...Read more

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Suggests contamination with urogenital or skin flora. >100,000 CFU/ml Lactobacillus species. 20,000 CFU/ml mixed gram positive flora. What's it mean?

Suggests contamination with urogenital or skin flora. 
>100,000 CFU/ml Lactobacillus species.
20,000 CFU/ml mixed gram positive flora. 
What's it mean?

Means contaminated: Urine specimen from the surrounding area around urethra (opening where the urine comes out from). You may want to repeat the test , if your doctor still wants that, get a clean catch specimen, which entails cleansing the area first, passing some urine, then obtain a midstream urine sample, follow the lab instructions for that, best wishes ...Read more

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What does culture yielded growth of staphylococcus aureus mean?

What does culture yielded growth of staphylococcus aureus mean?

Common skin germ: Staph aureus is just a common skin germ that is often found in abscesses or pustules. It is considered more invasive or aggressive than many other skin germs.MRSA is one strain of this germ. ...Read more

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Differentiate between staphylococcus and streptococcus species in terms of Morphology,Biochemical test and Culture?

Differentiate between staphylococcus and streptococcus species in terms of Morphology,Biochemical test and Culture?

Staph vs Strep: This is a complex subject that is not conducive to extensive discussion here. Suggest you get a microbiology text. Staphylococci are larger and grow more in clumps than chains. Staph that produce coagulase are species aureus, the others are a wide variety of less pathogenic organisms except for lugdenensis which has characteristics of aureus in producing disease. ...Read more

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Urine Culture Results 50,000-100,000 CFU/mL Staphylococcus coagulase negative not S.saprophyticus 10,000-50,000 CFU/mL Multiple organisms Meaning?

Urine Culture Results
50,000-100,000 CFU/mL Staphylococcus coagulase negative not S.saprophyticus
10,000-50,000 CFU/mL Multiple organisms
Meaning?

See below: All laboratory results need to be interpreted in the clinical context and the doctor who ordered the tests is usually in the best position to do that. Having said that, the colony count, the dominant organism and multiple organism all suggest that this is not real urinary infection. The organisms are likely to be skin contaminants. ...Read more

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Is GBS a second cause of my UTI? culture results: 10,000 CFU/mL Streptococcus Group B, (S. agalactiae) AND >100,000 CFU/mL Escherichia coli

Is GBS a second cause of my UTI? culture results:  10,000 CFU/mL Streptococcus Group B, (S. agalactiae)	AND >100,000 CFU/mL Escherichia coli

Contamination: Urinary tract infection is usually a single organism. GBS is a normal organism of the vagina. In your case, it is likely that e. coli is the responsible organism for your UTI and GBS is just a contaminant especially that the count is 10,000 ...Read more

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How to differentiate between klebsiella pneumonia and flavobacteria (or novosphingobium) capsulatum?

How to differentiate between klebsiella pneumonia and flavobacteria (or novosphingobium) capsulatum?

Laboratory : The best way would be to obtain the specimen and send it to microbiology and have them grow the bacteria. They will tell you which growing ...Read more

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Gram Stain Result Few Polys Rare Gram negative rods N>10,000 CFU/mL normal upper respiratory flora present no squamous epithelial cells seen?

Gram Stain Result	
Few Polys
Rare Gram negative rods
N>10,000 CFU/mL normal upper respiratory flora present no squamous epithelial cells seen?

Context: gram negative rods not so common and that seems a large amt. This implies an infection requiring particular antibiotics and this is not the more common cause of sinus/bronchitis but Hemophilus ...Read more

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history of sinus infections +dx of UCTD. Recent sinus cultures positive atypical bacteria (Serratia marcescens +Stenotrophomonasmaltophilia - Why?

 history of sinus infections +dx of UCTD. Recent sinus cultures positive atypical bacteria (Serratia marcescens +Stenotrophomonasmaltophilia - Why?

ID physician: S maltophilia is an organism of low virulence and frequently colonizes fluids used in the hospital setting and patient cultures. Serratia species are opportunistic gram-negative bacteria that are widespread in the environment. And something is definitely wrong here...unless your on say prednisone (for MCTD) and didn't mention this. You should see an infectious disease physician ASAP. ...Read more

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Stool sample shows heavy growth of nontoxogenic e. Coli & streptococcus salivarius. Is this abnormal/problematic?

Stool sample shows heavy growth of nontoxogenic e. Coli & streptococcus salivarius.  Is this abnormal/problematic?

No: Assuming you are not symptomatic, these bacterial organisms are considered part of the normal gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The GI tract starts at the mouth and ends at the anus. Strep salivarius lives in the mouth whereas E. coli lives in the intestines. In only very rare instances does this strep cause illness. The type of E. Coli mentioned causes UTIs since the urinary and GI tracts are so close ...Read more

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Is there post-exposure prophylaxis for multi-resistant organisms such as mrsa, vre, esbls, mbls?

Is there post-exposure prophylaxis for multi-resistant organisms such as mrsa, vre, esbls, mbls?

Not really: For MRSA there is therapy to try and change your nasal and skin carriage states. For gut flora the use of unpasteurized yogurt or probiotics may reduce the relative numbers of unwanted bacteria, but there are no recommendations for antibiotic prophylaxis and this should be strongly discouraged as it is likely to worsen things. ...Read more

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What happens to colonized resistant bacteria (eg: esbl kleb) when trachee decannulated? Technical & references/links appreciated.

What happens to colonized resistant bacteria (eg: esbl kleb) when trachee decannulated? Technical & references/links appreciated.

Varies with patients: If a person had a trach and got it removed, and then healed up and resumed normal, natural clearing of mucus and microorganisms, that person should be able to be free of bacteria in the trachea and lungs (regardless of whether the bacteria is antibiotic resistant or not, because the human body doesn't know about antibiotic resistance). If the person remains abnormal, then some bacteria may remain. ...Read more

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Is streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis a neurological disorder?

Is streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis a neurological disorder?

Sort of: It's an infection of the nervous system, so i suppose you could call it a neurological disorder. But as an id specialist, i prefer to think of it as an infectious disease. ...Read more

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Aerobic semen culture showed enterococcus. Anaerobic culture was clear of bacteria. Does it mean an enterococcus species easier to be treated?

No: Aerobic means it grows in oxygen. Anaerobic means the bacteria grow in the absence of oxygen. Whether bacteria are aerobic or anaerobic does not determine how hard those bacteria are to treat. That is determined by whether we have readily available antibiotics capable of killing them. ...Read more