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Doctor insights on: Copd Pleural Effusion

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If an elderly person has renal impairment, CHF & hypernatremia (sodium presently 157 mmol/L) would it seem to be appropriate for him to be on a NORMAL SALINE IV fluid? Other conditions are COPD, pleural effusion, T2 diabetes, delirium, mild hepatic dysfun

If an elderly person has renal impairment, CHF & hypernatremia (sodium presently 157 mmol/L) would it seem to be appropriate for him to be on a NORMAL SALINE IV fluid? Other conditions are COPD, pleural effusion, T2 diabetes, delirium, mild hepatic dysfun

Multiple med problem: I would consider 1/4 N.S. a more appropriate fluid. Sounds multiple system are failing and he has a very high mortality. If one can correct the CHF and CRF then the other factors may correct themselves, but doubt that Hemodialysis is indicated in a 91 y/o ...Read more

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Dr. Sue Ferranti
936 doctors shared insights

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (Copd) (Definition)

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, otherwise known as COPD, may include chronic bronchitis, emphysema, or both. Chronic bronchitis is the production of increased mucus caused by inflammation. Bronchitis is considered chronic if you cough and produce excess mucus for most days three months out of the year, two years in a row. Emphysema is a disease that damages the air sacs or the smallest breathing tubes in the lungs. COPD is commonly associated with smoking. ...Read more


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Does no focal consolidation and no pleural effusion in xray rule out copd?

Does no focal consolidation and no pleural effusion in xray rule out copd?

No not really: COPD is a functional diagnosis, meaning that it is diagnosed by doing a lung function test, also known as a pft. During this test, you do a serious of breathing maneuvers to determine if you have copd, which is basically inability to blow all the air out of your lungs. Having a chest xray with "no focal consolidation and no pleural effusion" means that it is clear. You could still have copd. ...Read more

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Is pleural effusion dangerous?

Is pleural effusion dangerous?

Possible: Depends on cause of which there are many: pneumonia, cancer, heart failure, pulmonary embolism and more. Needs full evaluation and treatment. ...Read more

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How to manage pleural effusion?

How to manage pleural effusion?

Depends: Depends on ethiology. Provide more information about context and severity to provide specific answer. ...Read more

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How is pleural effusion diagnosed?

How is pleural effusion diagnosed?

Exam and xray: The basic way to diagnose a pleural effusion is with an examination and auscultation of your chest and an xray of your chest. ...Read more

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What is a pleural effusion? How is it treated?

Fluid around lung: Fluid in the pleural space around the lung can come from heart failure, cancer, infection, etc. It is treated by drainage with a needle, insertion of a chest tube, or surgery. ...Read more

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I need information on pleural effusion causes?

Many: Cancer, pneumonia, trauma, liver disease, kidney disease, radiation, esophageal problem, other infection, pancreatitis, etc. ...Read more

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What is minimal pleural effusion or thickening right?

Tuberculosis: Yoy have tuberculosis(tb) noted in your history. Tb can cause abnormalities like pleural thickening and effusion. The treatment your are taking is appropriate and you should be following along with your doctor. Your x-ray or ct scan evaluates the lung and the radiologist interprets the findings. ...Read more

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Is there a cure for pleural effusion?

Treat the cause: Pleural effusion is not a disease. It results when the production of pleural fluid exceeds the body's ability to reabsorb it. It has many causes (pneumonia, heart failure, blood clots, trauma, bleeding). Fixing the underlying cause with or withourt draining the fluid usually results in "cure". With some exceptions, cancer that causes pleural effusion is not curable, but it it is treatable. ...Read more

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Copd (Definition)

COPD may include chronic bronchitis, emphysema, or both. Chronic bronchitis is the production of increased mucus caused by inflammation. Bronchitis is considered chronic if you cough and produce excess mucus most days for three months in a year, two years in a row. Emphysema is a disease that damages the air sacs and/or the smallest breathing tubes in the lungs. ...Read more


Dr. Sue Ferranti
605 doctors shared insights

Fluid In The Lungs (Definition)

Fluid around lungs has many causes. It can be exudate(thick i.E pus from infection, malignancy etc) or transudative(heart failure). It may be treated based on the problem found by sampling(thoracentesis). Labs on the fluid help the clinician determine the etiology. For recurring pleural fluid, sometime pleuradesis is necessary to hep prevent recurrance. Need ...Read more