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Doctor insights on: Congenital Tracheomalacia

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Are congenital heart defects hereditary?

Are congenital heart defects hereditary?

Depends on variables: There are a few syndromes with high frequency of specific heart defects that can have inheritance risk up to 50%. Most, however, are part of a complex inheritance pattern with around 5% risk.This 5% would include any pattern of congenital heart defect, not necessarily the same one. ...Read more

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What is fontan operation in congenital heart defects?

What is fontan operation in congenital heart defects?

Fontan Procedure: The fontan is a surgery that connects the inferior venacava (ivc) to the pulmonary arteries. The fontan is the final surgery for patients who have a single ventricle or single ventricle physiology. This means that the blue blood, desaturated blood retruning to the heart is directed to the lungs without being pumped through the heart. ...Read more

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Are congenital heart defects usually deadly?

Are congenital heart defects usually deadly?

No: In fact, most babies with congenital heart disease are expected to reach adulthood. Some of the more severe lesions have up to a 30% mortality in the first year, however these are less common than the more treatable defects. ...Read more

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What is congenital diaphragmatic hernia?

What is congenital diaphragmatic hernia?

Variable defect: When the diaphram fails to finish forming, a hole is left between the chest ; abdomen ; bowel can slip into the lung cavity (herniate) before or just after birth(when baby starts to cry ; swallow air).If the lung forms well ; bowel slips later, there is a better chance of lomg term survival. Without room to form the lung on that side can fail.Rapid recognition ; suportiive care is a must. ...Read more

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Is a PDA (patent ductus arteriosus) considered a chd (congenital heart defect)..?

Yes: Yes - if it persists then it would qualify as chd and if it is audible in a child past infancy then it would ordinarily be closed in the cathetization laboratory. ...Read more

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Can congenital dislocated hip affect childhood development?

Can congenital dislocated hip affect childhood development?

Usually not: Developmental hip dysplasia, formerly called congenital hip dislocation, should not affect future development unless associated with another anomaly in major organ. ...Read more

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Tracheo-oesophageal fistula and oesophageal atresia hereditary?

Tracheo-oesophageal fistula and oesophageal atresia hereditary?

Not usually: Esophageal atresia with or with out fistula is usually sporadic. There area a few cases ( and i mean very few) in the literature where a parent had ea-tef and had a child with same. It is reportable. ...Read more

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Is congenital heart disease genetic?

Is congenital heart disease genetic?

Some of it: Even though 8 out of every 1000 babies born will have have some form of heart defect, when there is a first line family member affected the number goes up to about 16-30/1000 (for some particular defects this number will be higher) so this would suggest a genetic component...We just haven't learned enough about genetics and the heart to be more precise, but this is changing every day. ...Read more

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Is mitral stenosis inherited?

Is mitral stenosis inherited?

Mitral stenosis: Usually from rheumatic fever and not inherited. ...Read more

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Is ventricular or atrial septal defect hereditary?

Most cases no: The chances of being born with a heart defect are approximately 8 per every thousand deliveries (a little under 1%). Most babies born with a heart defect (asd, vsd or any of a multitude of others) have no family members with heart disease. Now, when there is a first line family member with a heart defect the chances increase to about 2-3%, so there may be some genetic component. ...Read more

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Pulmonary hypertension and artial septal defect?

Pulmonary hypertension and artial septal defect?

PH and ASD: One cause of elevated blood pressure in the lungs, called pulmonary hypertension (PH) is an abnormal connection between the heart chambers such as an atrial septal defect that connects the top 2 compartments. ...Read more

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What is congenital scoliosis?

What is congenital scoliosis?

Type of spine curve: There are multiple reasons for scoliosis &one is known as a congenital type which is when there is a deformity of the bones ( vertebra) of the spine that one is born with & leads to an early curvature of the spine. Some don't need surgery & others do. They tend to not respond to bracing & can be very progressive in terms of a rapidly worsening curve & may be associated with other medical issues. ...Read more

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The most common cyanotic congenital heart defect is what?

The most common cyanotic congenital heart defect is what?

ToF/TGA: As other's mentioned, Tetralogy of Fallot is the most common form of cyanotic congenital heart disease in the US overall/after infancy. In some regions, transposition of the great arteries is the most common in the newborn period. ...Read more

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Does lordosis predispose someone to congenital lateral recess stenosis?

Does lordosis predispose someone to congenital lateral recess stenosis?

No: Hi
Strictly speaking, "congenital" means that you were born with it. However, I would say if you were born with congenital lateral recess stenosis and developed excessive lordosis as an adult, then you could be more prone to developing symptoms like back pain. Hope this helps ...Read more

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How common are babies born with congenital abnormalities?

How common are babies born with congenital abnormalities?

2--3%, up to 7%: The usual quoted rate is as low as 2-3%. However in one prospective study of the outcome of 5, 964 pregnancies the incidence rose to 7%! the cause of 40-60% of congenital anomalies in humans is unknown. These are referred to as sporadic, a term that implies an unknown cause, random occurrence regardless of maternal living conditions. ...Read more

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What are the possible causes of acquired tracheomalacia (NOT congenital) in toddler? Vascular rings have been ruled out via CT scan & bronchoscopy.

What are the possible causes of acquired tracheomalacia (NOT congenital) in toddler? Vascular rings have been ruled out via CT scan & bronchoscopy.

Other studies: Here are some other studies that are sometimes done to investigate the cause tracheomalacia: airway fluoroscopy, barium swallow, pulmonary function tests I'm assuming the child has never been intubated ( breathing tube) or had surgery in the area ( both can cause acquired tracheomalacia). Sounds like your child is already seeing a pulmonoogist or ENT. That's who I would refer to. ...Read more

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What are the symptoms of tracheomalacia?

What are the symptoms of tracheomalacia?

Respiratory issues: Tracheomalacia is a weakness of the supportive cartilage of the windpipe (trachea) which can present as difficulty breathing (stridor) usually presenting during exercise or other exertion. ...Read more

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Tell me about tracheomalacia in infants?

Tell me about tracheomalacia in infants?

Uncommon: Tracheomalacia is collapse of the trachea (the windpipe) and is often confused with laryngomalacia which is collapse of the voicebox (which is above the trachea). Tracheomalacia is quite uncommon in infants except those with repaired t-e fistulas, and those with unrepaired vascular rings. ...Read more

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Are tracheomalacia & bronchomalacia the same thing? Or are they different?

Are tracheomalacia & bronchomalacia the same thing? Or are they different?

No: Tracheomalacia: Flaccidity of the tracheal walls secondary to defective cartilaginous rings. Bronchomalacia: Flaccidity of the bronchial wall secondary ot defective cartilageinous ring These conditions can be primary, that is the cartilage is lacking or secondary due to compression on the cartilage. They are often together. ...Read more

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What is tracheomalacia?

What is tracheomalacia?

Tracheomalacia: Tracheomalacia is the collapsing of the trachea (the tube that brings air from the back of the throat to the lungs) with breathing in (inspiration). The front part of the trachea has hard cartilage, and the back a soft membrane. In patients with emphysema or other conditions, that soft part can collapse with inspiration causing a partial obstruction and difficulties breathing. ...Read more

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What causes tracheomalacia?

What causes tracheomalacia?

Uncommon: Tracheomalacia is collapse of the trachea (the windpipe) and is often confused with laryngomalacia which is collapse of the voicebox (which is above the trachea). Tracheomalacia is quite uncommon in infants except those with repaired t-e fistulas, and those with unrepaired vascular rings. ...Read more

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Need info on tracheomalacia?

Need info on tracheomalacia?

Tracheal flattening: Usually do to weakness of the cartilage "rings" along front wall of trachea. Usually these cartilage rings are u-shaped and prop the trachea open. Some call invagination of the soft back wall of trachea as tracheomalacia. Not really, but has same effect of narrowing the tracheal opening. In latter case, can place flat prosthesis to keep soft posterior wall from invaginating in. Can also stent. ...Read more

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What can affect my tracheomalacia?

What can  affect my tracheomalacia?

Forceful exhalation: Breathing out too forcefully can make the effect of tracheomalacia worse ... Also weight gain that causes the fat in the mediastinum around the trachea can compress the trachea more ... ...Read more

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Tracheomalacia, what is that caused by?

Tracheomalacia, what is that caused by?

Rare: Tracheomalacia is a rare complication following prolonged endotracheal intubation for any reason and results from compromise of the arterial circulation due to prolonged mechanical compression of the inflated balloon against tracheal mucosa. It takes weeks for this to occur so doesn't happen routinely following heart bypass or other operations. Tracheostomy prevents it. ...Read more

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What is tracheomalacia, can you help me?

What is tracheomalacia, can you help me?

Tracheomalacia: ... Is weakness or floppiness of the cartilage of the trachea that results in narrowing or collapse of the trachea when you breathe in. It can be something you are born with, or it can result from compression or from infection for inflammation, and also from having a breathing tube for a long time. If you are concerned about tracheomalacia, you should see a doctor. ...Read more

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What is the etiology of tracheomalacia after bypass?

What is the etiology of tracheomalacia after bypass?

Not sure: Cannot think of connection between bypass surgery and tracheomalacia ... May have already had undiagnosed tracheomalacia, but diagnosed by anesthesiologist or intensivist while intubated for your bypass surgery ... Also prolonged mechanical ventilator support, with prolonged intubation may have caused inflammation of your trachea that may have caused some weakening of your tracheal cartilages. ...Read more

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What are best treatments for children with tracheomalacia?

What are best treatments for children with tracheomalacia?

Non surgical: Tracheomalacia is rarely serious enough to need surgery. The best treatments are pulmonary medications like asthma medications. If necessary, nighttime CPAP or bipap therapy like used for sleep apnea can help a lot. It is best to make sure there isn't an underlying cause. Tracheomalacia is not the same as laryngomalacia and is not related. ...Read more

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Help docs! i'm trying to find out what causes tracheomalacia in newborns?

Help docs! i'm trying to find out what causes tracheomalacia in newborns?

Dont know: There is a lot if information what what it is but not the what causes it. So do not know if it is just genetic (most likely) or environmental (in which case we should see a whole lot more of it). Infants do outgrow it. I would not be too worried about what causes it as the baby already has it...So lets deal with the here and now... ...Read more

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The doctors suspect my 6 month old has a vascular ring if so does that mean he coud also have tracheomalacia?

The doctors suspect my 6 month old has a vascular ring if so does that mean he coud also have tracheomalacia?

Vascular ring: Yes, in some cases. The vascular ring, is a congenital malformation, in which one of the embryological dorsal aortas is not reabsorbed, and does not grow at the same rate as the body does. No medical therapy exists for the definitive treatment of vascular rings. Preoperatively, the patient should be given adequate nutritional support as well as general respiratory care and appropriate treatment of any respiratory tract infection. Surgery should not be delayed in the presence of a respiratory tract infection, because the division of the ring allows more adequate and complete clearing of respiratory secretions. ...Read more

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My doctor thinks that my daughter is suffering from tracheomalacia. What does this mean?

My doctor thinks that my daughter is suffering from tracheomalacia. What does this mean?

Weakness of windpipe: Malacia is weakness of a portion of the airway (trachea is the first portion of the airway and bronchomalacia is weakness of airways further down in the lungs). It can occur when someone is born premature, after a bad infection or after a tracheostomy. Usually wheezing in the upper airway with shortness of breath is common. Breathing tests can help suggest it is present / other tests often need. ...Read more

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My 2mos son has larynomalacia, tracheomalacia & bronchial problems. Is trachea an only option? Traheal stent, do they work & are they comfortable?

My 2mos son has larynomalacia, tracheomalacia & bronchial problems. Is trachea an only option? Traheal stent, do they work & are they comfortable?

Tracheomalacia: If the diagnosis is indeed correct, and his is severe enough that it is severely affecting his breathing ability and/or growth, a trach may indeed be one of the few options for him. Most infants do not need their laryngotracheomalacia treated - as the trachea develops on its own, symptoms would resolve. But if severe enough, the airway must be opened and that usually involves a tracheostomy. ...Read more

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What is the etiology of tracheomalacia after heart bypass?

What is the etiology of tracheomalacia after heart bypass?

Rare: Tracheomalacia is a rare complication following prolonged endotracheal intubation for any reason and results from compromise of the arterial circulation due to prolonged mechanical compression of the inflated balloon against tracheal mucosa. It takes weeks for this to occur so doesn't happen routinely following heart bypass or other operations. Tracheostomy prevents it. ...Read more

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Why do patients often develop tracheomalacia after cardiac surgery?

Very rare: Patients do not often develop tracheomalacia after heart surgery. It is very rare for that to happen. When it does occur it is related to prolonged need for a ventilator and a breathing tube that is inverted prior to surgery. Usualy that tube is removed immediately after surgery of 4-6 hours later. If it is needed for more than 10-14 days then a tracheostomy is done to prevent such problems. ...Read more

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