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Doctor insights on: Colorectal Cancer Symptoms Belching

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What are early symptoms of colorectal cancer?

What are early symptoms of colorectal cancer?

May be none: Many early cancers do not have any symptoms and that is why it is important to have screening tests done, e.g., colonoscopy at age 50 for prevention of colo-rectal cancer. Symptoms may be change in bowel habits, bleeding per rectum, anemia, bowel obstruction and the first symptoms may be from metastases to other organs such as liver. ...Read more

Dr. Herbert Hoover
236 Doctors shared insights

Colorectal Cancer (Definition)

Colorectal cancer is cancer of the colon or rectum. The cells lining the colon or rectum become abnormal and grow uncontrollably. They start as polyps. Symptoms include blood in the stool, constipation, loss of appetite, and weight loss. This cancer can be prevented through early screening, if a polyp is detected during a colonoscopy and excised. Additionally, a high fiber diet with plenty of water and a ...Read more


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What are the signs and symptoms of colorectal cancer?

What are the signs and symptoms of colorectal cancer?

None: Usually there are no symptoms. Later can develop intestinal or rectal bleeding, anemia, weight loss, intestinal blockage, change in bowel movements, etc. ...Read more

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What are the symptoms of colorectal cancer?

What are the symptoms of colorectal cancer?

Varied: Lesions of the right colon hard to dx early since bowel content is liquified. On left side, content is solid and if lesion present, obstruction occurs if lesion circumferential or bleeding noted from irritation of hard stool against lesion. On rt. As well as left side ideal time to define is before symptoms by routine colonoscopy ...Read more

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What are common symptoms of colorectal cancer?

What are common symptoms of colorectal cancer?

Blockage, Bleeding: The most common symptoms associated with colon cancer include (cramping) abdominal pain, a change in bowel habits ("pencil-thin stools"), bloody bowel movements, weakness/fatigue, and/or weight loss. The goal, of course, is to diagnose colon cancers before symptoms develop; I advise colonoscopy at age 50, or earlier if there is a family history. ...Read more

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What are common early symptoms of colorectal cancer?

What are common early symptoms of colorectal cancer?

Often "silent": Unfortunately, colon cancers may develop "under the radar" for quite some time before symptoms occur. The earliest sign is usually anemia caused by a slowly bleeding tumor. As the cancer grows, it may block the colon causing cramping pain, bloating, and/or pencil-thin stools. The gold standard for diagnosing colorectal cancer is screening colonoscopy at age 50, or earlier with a family history. ...Read more

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I am 16 years old. I'm very afraid I may have colorectal cancer or ovarian cancer. My symptoms are very similar. Is it too late to treat either?

I am 16 years old. I'm very afraid I may have colorectal cancer or ovarian cancer. My symptoms are very similar. Is it too late to treat either?

Cancer: There are many things that cause diarrhea, pain, and bloating. Particularly at your age, cancer would not be a top consideration, it would be pretty far down on the list. Don't speculate on the worst possible case scenario. See your doctor, he/she will help sort it out. ...Read more

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How probable would colorectal cancer be at 22 with no family history or risk factors. I always have a fear of cancers and make up symptoms in my head.

Low risk: The risk of colorectal cancer for a 22 year old person with no family history is low. Typical symptoms which would warrant investigation include rectal bleeding and a persistent change in bowel habits. Routine screening colonoscopy should begin around age 50. ...Read more

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I am 23 male. I had symptoms of hemorroid for one year. I fear it be colorectal cancer as my stool is thin but not much may it be?

I am 23 male. I had symptoms of hemorroid for one year. I fear it be colorectal cancer as my stool is thin but not much may it be?

See colorectal doc: Best way to identify the problem at hand is visiting a colorectal surgeon who can examine the area and advise you accordingly. ...Read more

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Mom is 52. Smokes 2-3 cigs a day. Does she need to get screening colonoscopy even without symptoms? What are chances of colorectal cancer?

Mom is 52. Smokes 2-3 cigs a day. Does she need to get screening colonoscopy even without symptoms? What are chances of colorectal cancer?

Needs colonoscopy: Studies have shown that all normal-risk individuals should have a screening colonoscopy starting at age 50 and repeated at least every 10 years if no polyps are found. All polyps should be removed. If there is a positive family history for colon cancer, screening should start at an earlier age. There is about a 5% lifetime risk of developing colon cancer. ...Read more

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I'm 30.Afraid of colorectal cancer due to rectal bleeding+other symptoms. Can PCP order virtual colonoscopy or must I visit gastro? Is virtual good?

I'm 30.Afraid of colorectal cancer due to rectal bleeding+other symptoms. Can PCP order virtual colonoscopy or must I visit gastro? Is virtual good?

Colonoscopy: Virtual colonoscopy has value but w/the symptoms you mention you need a real one, which will yield more information. Your PCP can refer you to a gastro, which is the type of doc you would be best served by. Peace and good health. ...Read more

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What ages does colorectal cancer affect?

What ages does colorectal cancer affect?

It varies: Colon cancer can strike from the 20s and beyond, but is much more common in people in their 50s to 70s hence the recommendations to not routinely do colonoscopies in people before the age of 50. Colon cancer that presents before 60 is often genetic whereas after 60 is more likely due to environmental factors like smoking and red meat. ...Read more

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Can you tell me what is colorectal cancer?

Can you tell me what is colorectal cancer?

CRC: It is cancer of the large intestine (which includes the colon and the rectum, the part labeled #5 in the illustration). It is the third most common cancer for both sexes and one of the few for which there is successful screening methods. Usually starts in a polyp and can be associated with several inherited traits. ...Read more

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Colorectal cancer is really serious, right?

Serious, right!: Colorectal cancer is very serious. It can also be completely and relatively easily cured if detected early. Screening should be performed at around 50 years of age. Certain people are at higher risk and should be checked earlier. Colonoscopy is the most reliable test at this time. If you are having symptoms that concern you, you should ask your dr. ...Read more

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How is colorectal cancer diagnosed usually?

Colonoscopy, imaging: And biopsy. A lesion may be detected on colonscopy or barium enema or the more recent ct scans. The lesion is biopsied and the tissue examined by a pathologist to make the diagnosis. Colon cancer may be suspected if there is blood in stool, either obvious or occult. ...Read more

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What are some of the tests for Colorectal cancer?

What are some of the tests for Colorectal cancer?

The tests for Colorectal cancer include:: Biopsy, Complete blood count, CEA, Colonoscopy, Kidney function tests, MRI of pelvis, PET scan, Comprehensive metabolic panel, Barium enema, Virtual colonoscopy, CT of abdomen and pelvis with contast, Fecal occult blood. ...Read more

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What are the chances of colorectal cancer at age 37?

What are the chances of colorectal cancer at age 37?

Low: Chances are low, but this is not impossible. If you have a strong family history then the chances go up. Most people don't need any screening for colorectal cancer until age 50, or 10 years younger than age of diagnosis for your relative. ...Read more

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What are some pre-cancerous signs of colorectal cancer?

What are some pre-cancerous signs of colorectal cancer?

Colonic polyps: Nearly all colon cancers arise in colon polyps. Unfortunately, colonic polyps are generally asymptomatic and require colonscopy of barium enema for detection. Newer imaging studies may make the detection easier. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease have higher incidence of colon cancer. A family history of colon cancer is an other "sign". ...Read more

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I know colorectal cancer has consequences. What are they?

I know colorectal cancer has consequences. What are they?

Colorectal cancer: Consequences include need for surgery and other forms of treatment such as chemotherapy radiation. People may live for along time if disease caught early. ...Read more

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What is the definition or description of: colorectal cancer?

What is the definition or description of: colorectal cancer?

Invasion: Colorectal cancer is a term to signify invasion accross a layer of the lining of the colon or rectum. A polyp can show abnormal features up to a point and still not be considered an invasive cancer. Once we use the term colon or rectal cancer, the cells are not only atypical, they have shown invasion. ...Read more

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Need expert help here. What are some signs of colorectal cancer?

Need expert help here. What are some signs of colorectal cancer?

Nonspecific signs: There may be blood in the stool, either visible or only detectable by testing; stool may be black (which means blood); change in bowel habits such as diarrhea or constipation or change in diameter/consistency of stools; fatigue, weakness, shortness of breath. There can be crampy abdominal pain and a feeling that your bowels are not emptying completely. There may be unexplained weight loss. ...Read more

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Who should get screened for colorectal cancer?

Who should get screened for colorectal cancer?

Everyone, most >50: Most people are considered "average risk" for colorectal cancer, and should begin screening @ 50, typically with a colonoscopy. Some people at increased risk, such as those with inflammatory bowel disease or a family history of colorectal cancer. These people may need screening at a younger age-generally 10 yrs earlier than the age when their relative got colon cancer. Talk w/ your doctor. ...Read more

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Is it possible to have colorectal cancer without having polyps?

Is it possible to have colorectal cancer without having polyps?

Possible: For a small percentage of colon cancers caused by lynch syndrome (also known as hnpcc - hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer), there is an absence of polyps. ...Read more

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Is stage 4 colorectal cancer curable?

Majority will be No: When the cancer has spread to other organ beyond the primary organ-metastatic disease- or stage 4-, majority, it is an incurable disease. In a very selected case, when the metastatic disease is very limited - 1 or 2- only in the liver or only in the lung- and no other disease anywhere else and if surgery can be done to remove completely, attemp to cure the cancer can be done with chemo & surgery. ...Read more

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What the role of nsaid in colorectal cancer?

What the role of nsaid in colorectal cancer?

NSAIDs v coloncancer: Many studies have reported a beneficial link between nsaids (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) especially Aspirin and colon cancer (http://www. Cancer. Org/cancer/colonandrectumcancer/detailedguide/colorectal-cancer-prevention). Studies show Aspirin as having strongest protective benefit. However, Aspirin & all nsaids can also cause bleeding as well aggravate kidney function. So talk to ur doc. ...Read more

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Can colorectal cancer cause bladder pressure?

Can colorectal cancer cause bladder pressure?

Yes: If the mass remains there and if it is located close to the bladder and pressing the bladder-yes- you can have bladder pressure. ...Read more

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What are my treatment options for colorectal cancer?

What are my treatment options for colorectal cancer?

Depends on stage.: Surgical resection is the primary treatment for most cases. However, the stage (extent of growth and spread) is very important to deciding on the treatment. If there is spread to other organs that cannot be removed, chemotherapy would be the primary treatment unless continued bleeding or obstruction prompt removal of the primary tumor. Radiation is important for rectal cancer that has not spread. ...Read more

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What are the tests for hereditary colorectal cancer?

Usual: Se as for non hereditary, a colonoscopy is best. If you are high risk it is usually recommended tat the testing start earlier than age 50, the specific age depending on the circumstances. ...Read more

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Where does colorectal cancer affect before metastasis?

Mesenteric nodes: As colon cancer grows from premalignant cells in the mucosa of bowel it invades the muscularis reaching serosal outer surface (Dukes B). It then invades nodes of the mesentery C1 expanding to 4 or more nodes C2 and then along the mesenteric lymphatics to liver. Subpopulations in the primary however can eventually spread directly to lung or bone depending on their surface antigens. ...Read more

Dr. Barry Rosen
4,344 Doctors shared insights

Cancer (Definition)

Cancer is a group of diseases that is characterized by uncontrolled cell growth leading to invasion of surrounding tissues that spread to other parts of the body. Cancer can begin anywhere in the body and is usually related to one or more genetic mutations that allow normal cells to become malignant by interfering with internal cellular control mechanisms, such as programmed cell death or by preventing ...Read more


Dr. Jan Lei Iwata
438 Doctors shared insights

Belching (Definition)

Belching (big burps) is a symptom in which a person forces air noisily from his stomach out through his mouth. Belching can be due to too much air or gas in the stomach. Sometimes, people purposely swallow air and belch it back ...Read more