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Doctor insights on: Colorectal Cancer Spread To Testicles

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I have mai and colorectal cancer. Can I spread mia and do I need treatment? My sister tested positive for tb, did I give her this through my mia?

I have mai and colorectal cancer. Can I spread mia and do I need treatment? My sister tested positive for tb, did I give her this through my mia?

Complicated: I assume you mean mycobacterium avium intracellulare. It is not likely that you will spread this, but knowing how it was isolated and what disease (if any) it is causing would be helpful in answering you. It has not caused TB in your sister. It has nothing to do with colorectal cancer, except that your treatment may leave you immune suppressed and susceptible to disease by this organism. ...Read more

Dr. Herbert Hoover
236 doctors shared insights

Colorectal Cancer (Definition)

Colorectal cancer is cancer of the colon or rectum. The cells lining the colon or rectum become abnormal and grow uncontrollably. They start as polyps. Symptoms include blood in the stool, constipation, loss of appetite, and weight loss. This cancer can be prevented through early screening, if a polyp is detected during a colonoscopy and excised. Additionally, a high fiber diet with plenty of water and a ...Read more


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Is it possible for stage three colorectal cancer to grow and spread during radiation and chemo treatments?

Is it possible for stage three colorectal cancer to grow and spread during radiation and chemo treatments?

Yes it can do so: Cancer can and sometimes does grow/progress right through the given treatment. It happens when the Cancer cells are resistant to the chemotherapy which is the case in about half of colorectal cancer patients treated with chemotherapy. A change of treatment is then required as the new treatment(different drugs) may still have a chance to work on the cancer. Your oncologist can explain this better. ...Read more

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Life expectancy for stage four colorectal cancer spread to liver, on hospice with no treatment for past five months?

Life expectancy for stage four colorectal cancer spread to liver, on hospice with no treatment for past five months?

Colorectal Cancer: That is a difficult question to answer. Since we do not have all the facts especially concerning the overall health otherwise of the patient or their current health it is impossible to say. The best person to talk to about this is the physician who is following the patient now. ...Read more

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58 Years old diagnosed with Stage IV colorectal cancer and spread to liver with 7+cm tumor and lesions in the lung. What kind of life expectancy?

58 Years old diagnosed with Stage IV colorectal cancer and spread to liver with 7+cm tumor and lesions in the lung. What kind of life expectancy?

It Depends: Recent progress in genetic typing of individual Colon Ca tumors and genetic specific tumor drugs is leading to better understanding of likelihood of treatment success. See: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Arun_Azad/publication/246837094_Predicting_the_response_to_targeted_therapy_in_metastatic_colorectal_cancer/links/5419c4180cf2218008bf9f8a.pdf
I recommend getting into a clinical trial. ...Read more

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How should you decide which colorectal cancer screening test(s) to get and how often to be screened?

How should you decide which colorectal cancer screening test(s) to get and how often to be screened?

Colonoscopy: Average risk people should have colonoscopies every 10 years starting at 50 until 70-75. This may be tempered by medical resources or a person medical history. ...Read more

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What ages does colorectal cancer affect?

What ages does colorectal cancer affect?

It varies: Colon cancer can strike from the 20s and beyond, but is much more common in people in their 50s to 70s hence the recommendations to not routinely do colonoscopies in people before the age of 50. Colon cancer that presents before 60 is often genetic whereas after 60 is more likely due to environmental factors like smoking and red meat. ...Read more

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Can you tell me what is colorectal cancer?

Can you tell me what is colorectal cancer?

CRC: It is cancer of the large intestine (which includes the colon and the rectum, the part labeled #5 in the illustration). It is the third most common cancer for both sexes and one of the few for which there is successful screening methods. Usually starts in a polyp and can be associated with several inherited traits. ...Read more

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Colorectal cancer is really serious, right?

Serious, right!: Colorectal cancer is very serious. It can also be completely and relatively easily cured if detected early. Screening should be performed at around 50 years of age. Certain people are at higher risk and should be checked earlier. Colonoscopy is the most reliable test at this time. If you are having symptoms that concern you, you should ask your dr. ...Read more

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How is colorectal cancer diagnosed usually?

How is colorectal cancer diagnosed usually?

Colonoscopy, imaging: And biopsy. A lesion may be detected on colonscopy or barium enema or the more recent ct scans. The lesion is biopsied and the tissue examined by a pathologist to make the diagnosis. Colon cancer may be suspected if there is blood in stool, either obvious or occult. ...Read more

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What are early symptoms of colorectal cancer?

May be none: Many early cancers do not have any symptoms and that is why it is important to have screening tests done, e.g., colonoscopy at age 50 for prevention of colo-rectal cancer. Symptoms may be change in bowel habits, bleeding per rectum, anemia, bowel obstruction and the first symptoms may be from metastases to other organs such as liver. ...Read more

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What are some tests for Colorectal cancer?

What are some tests for Colorectal cancer?

The tests for Colorectal cancer include:: Biopsy, Complete blood count, CEA, Colonoscopy, Kidney function tests, MRI of pelvis, PET scan, Comprehensive metabolic panel, Barium enema, Virtual colonoscopy, CT of abdomen and pelvis with contast, Fecal occult blood. ...Read more

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What are the chances of colorectal cancer at age 37?

What are the chances of colorectal cancer at age 37?

Low: Chances are low, but this is not impossible. If you have a strong family history then the chances go up. Most people don't need any screening for colorectal cancer until age 50, or 10 years younger than age of diagnosis for your relative. ...Read more

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What are some pre-cancerous signs of colorectal cancer?

What are some pre-cancerous signs of colorectal cancer?

Colonic polyps: Nearly all colon cancers arise in colon polyps. Unfortunately, colonic polyps are generally asymptomatic and require colonscopy of barium enema for detection. Newer imaging studies may make the detection easier. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease have higher incidence of colon cancer. A family history of colon cancer is another "sign". ...Read more

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I know colorectal cancer has consequences. What are they?

I know colorectal cancer has consequences. What are they?

Colorectal cancer: Consequences include need for surgery and other forms of treatment such as chemotherapy radiation. People may live for a long time if disease caught early. ...Read more

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What is the definition or description of: colorectal cancer?

What is the definition or description of: colorectal cancer?

Invasion: Colorectal cancer is a term to signify invasion accross a layer of the lining of the colon or rectum. A polyp can show abnormal features up to a point and still not be considered an invasive cancer. Once we use the term colon or rectal cancer, the cells are not only atypical, they have shown invasion. ...Read more

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Need expert help here. What are some signs of colorectal cancer?

Need expert help here. What are some signs of colorectal cancer?

Nonspecific signs: There may be blood in the stool, either visible or only detectable by testing; stool may be black (which means blood); change in bowel habits such as diarrhea or constipation or change in diameter/consistency of stools; fatigue, weakness, shortness of breath. There can be crampy abdominal pain and a feeling that your bowels are not emptying completely. There may be unexplained weight loss. ...Read more

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Who should get screened for colorectal cancer?

Who should get screened for colorectal cancer?

Everyone, most >50: Most people are considered "average risk" for colorectal cancer, and should begin screening @ 50, typically with a colonoscopy. Some people at increased risk, such as those with inflammatory bowel disease or a family history of colorectal cancer. These people may need screening at a younger age-generally 10 yrs earlier than the age when their relative got colon cancer. Talk w/ your doctor. ...Read more

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What are the signs and symptoms of colorectal cancer?

What are the signs and symptoms of colorectal cancer?

None: Usually there are no symptoms. Later can develop intestinal or rectal bleeding, anemia, weight loss, intestinal blockage, change in bowel movements, etc. ...Read more

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Is it possible to have colorectal cancer without having polyps?

Is it possible to have colorectal cancer without having polyps?

Possible: For a small percentage of colon cancers caused by lynch syndrome (also known as hnpcc — hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer), there is an absence of polyps. ...Read more

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What the role of nsaid in colorectal cancer?

NSAIDs v coloncancer: Many studies have reported a beneficial link between nsaids (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) especially Aspirin and colon cancer (http://www.Cancer. Org/cancer/colonandrectumcancer/detailedguide/colorectal-cancer-prevention). Studies show Aspirin as having the strongest protective benefit. However, Aspirin & all nsaids can also cause bleeding as well aggravate kidney function. So talk to ur doc. ...Read more

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What are the treatments for metastatic colorectal cancer?

What are the treatments for metastatic colorectal cancer?

Chemo & RARE sx/rads: Chemo represents answers one through nine, however, if one has a solitary metastasis in the liver that is able to be surgically removed safely, this could be answer 10. Also, focused radiation (cyberknife or radiosugery as it called) can sometimes be used to treat isolated mets if surgery is not possible. ...Read more

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What are procedures used for colorectal cancer screening?

Several possible: You can check your stool for hidden blood, get colonoscopies (checks whole colon), or get a combination of flexible sigmoidoscopies (checks part of colon) and stool checks. Screening should be done between age 50 and 74 unless there is another reason to start earlier or go later. All of these methods work!
A good proven prevention guide by age is an iphone app called my health checklist 2012. ...Read more

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What screening tests are used for colorectal cancer?

Polyp detection and: Removal. Almost all colon cancers arise in polyps and colonoscopy is the best method for detection of polyps as well as colon cancers. Other methods are testing for occult blood in stool, barium enema and 3d ct scans. ...Read more

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Can a change in bowel habits mean colorectal cancer?

Can a change in bowel habits mean colorectal cancer?

Yes: Persistent changes not correlating to your dietary or activity change should be worked up by your doctor. It does not diagnose colon cancer by itself but it is one of the symptoms. ...Read more

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Does flax seed or green tea prevent colorectal cancer?

Not known: Though the supposed health benefits of these are touted, there is no definitively known knowledge that it will prevent any type of cancer. ...Read more

Dr. Barry Rosen
4,351 doctors shared insights

Cancer (Definition)

Cancer is a group of diseases that is characterized by uncontrolled cell growth leading to invasion of surrounding tissues that spread to other parts of the body. Cancer can begin anywhere in the body and is usually related to one or more genetic mutations that allow normal cells to become malignant by interfering with internal cellular control mechanisms, such as programmed cell death or by preventing ...Read more


Testicles (Definition)

The testicles are the two oval male gonads, or reproductive glands, located in the scrotum. The seminiferous tubules of the testis are the site of spermatogenesis and its leydig cells secrete testosterone. The term testicles is synonymous with testes or gonads. The singular form is ...Read more