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Doctor insights on: Color Blindness Research

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Do color blind people lack cones?

Do color blind people lack cones?

No: Color blind people have a set of rhodopsin light receptive pigments that are shifted in spectrum, giving a narrower range of color perception. Except for a few very rare forms, they have a normal cone count and so their acuity is normal. ...Read more

Dr. David Chandler
78 doctors shared insights

Color Blind (Definition)

Ophthalmologist prefer to use the term color deficit as blindness conveys other meanings. Lowered color perception can be inherited (many forms), can result from advanced loss of retinal cells, inherited retinal disease, and some forms occur due to CNS injury. There are excellent tests for the various types and they can be functionally ...Read more


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Whats ishihara color blindness test?

Whats ishihara color blindness test?

Color plates: The ishihara test plates are a series of dots of various colors with an embedded number or symbol which cannot be easily seen by the color deficient due to color confusion. They are the most commonly available test in ophthalmologists office although others are also available and some are better at separating the forms of color deficiency out. Ishihara is a good screening test. ...Read more

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How is color blindness inherited?

How is color blindness inherited?

Sex linked: The most common form is carried on the X chromosome and so it manifests more commonly by far in males who lack a corresponding X (as women do ) to compensate (males have a sort Y chromosome). It is therefore passed on to a male child from his mother who carries a defective X (and most likely a normal X matching it so she is not color deficient.). ...Read more

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Is color blindness common?

Is color blindness common?

Sort of: About 8% of males and 1% of females have some degree of color perception dysfunction. So it is sort of common but not the majority. It is inherited so the family connection is important and can be traced. ...Read more

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How does color deficiency differ from color blindness?

How does color deficiency differ from color blindness?

The same: Color blindness was the original term for conditions in which color recognition was impaired. Since "blindness" is a very charged termed, deficiency has been substituted as the politically correct term since most people with defects in color recognition are not blind at all. ...Read more

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Is color blindness reversible ?

Is color blindness reversible ?

May be : There two main kind of color blindness one genetic in nature and the other acquired, the genetic one is not revisable, the second in some cases it is. ...Read more

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Color blindness, is this normal?

Color blindness, is this normal?

Not quite: It is "normal" for those who have it. For those with actual normal color vision, it would be abnormal to lose it. ...Read more

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Geometric, flashing, colored patterns in vision. Is there any hope to cure this?

Geometric, flashing, colored patterns in vision. Is there any hope to cure this?

Ocular migraines!: Ocular migraines are a form of migraines that take place in the occipital cortex (part of the brain that interprets/controls vision). They lack the severe headache as common migraines. The symptoms are typically described as flashing of light or ziz-zag lights in the vision. They usually last less than 30 minutes and affect the vision out of both eyes. Look for what triggers them, and stop! ...Read more

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Hemophiliacs and color blindness, are there related?

Hemophiliacs and color blindness, are there related?

Unrelated: These are products of abnormal genes acting upon an entirely separate system within the body. They can occur together but are not related in any way. ...Read more

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Why natural selection hasn't eliminated colour blindness.?

Why natural selection hasn't eliminated colour blindness.?

Not needed: Normal color vision is not necessary for reproduction or survival. If we lived in a society where your necktie had to match your shirt in order to allow you to have children, then ultimately color blindness would be eliminated. However, we do not. ...Read more

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Someone became blind from cataract, would their eye color change?

Someone became blind from cataract, would their eye color change?

Might turn white: An advanced untreated cataract will eventually turn white in the pupillary space. If still untreated, some will dissolve and lose the white color but more often will rupture and set up a terrific inflammation inside the eye. In this era, cataract removal is so predictable and safe that advanced cataracts should be rare. ...Read more

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Effects of being color blind?

Minor: Depending upon the degree of your deficiency, you will be able to function for most activities (for instance traffic lights are a color designed to be seen by the color deficient). Occupations with issues for you: painter, fruit grader, electronic assembly worker, gemology, appraiser, artist. Legal restrictions for police work, pilots, boat captains. ...Read more

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Why am i color blind? What is the cause of color blindness? No one in my family has the gene that causes color blindness.

Why am i color blind? What is the cause of color blindness? No one in my family has the gene that causes color blindness.

Blame your Mom: If you have red-green color deficiency, then you carry a defective x-chromosome which you got from your mom (i assume you are a male). Your mom was a carrier so she was color normal and you had a 50% chance of getting the abnormal x from her. So in fact someone in your family, mom, had the gene. ...Read more

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Are there any good online color blindness tests?

Try this one: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cwyrp3hu4ke then go to your eye doctor. Patients can fail this test due to refractive error problems (need glasses), corneal problems, optic nerve problems, and cataracts. ...Read more

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What's the difference between poor color vision and born with color blindness?

What's the difference between poor color vision and born with color blindness?

Degree: Colorblindness is not necessarily all or nothing. There are varying degrees- thats all. ...Read more

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Is it possible to get accurate visual field test with macular pucker decline in visual acuity, lights less bright & white computer screen looking gray?

Is it possible to get accurate visual field test with macular pucker decline in visual acuity, lights less bright & white computer screen looking gray?

Usually it is fine: You have defects in the central visual portion of your field of view - an area poorly outlined by most field testing devices. Field tests will define major defects which largely will register from the peripheral areas tested. Have you had a field tested in the past? Is there some condition being sought for with a field.? Your ophthalmologist would not order a field if he doubts the result. ...Read more

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Nearsightedness is a recessive trait. red-green color blindness is a sex-linked recessive trait, what does this mean?

Nearsightedness is a recessive trait. red-green color blindness is a sex-linked recessive trait, what does this mean?

An Autosomal: Recessive disorder: Both parents are unaffected carriers of a mutant gene. Each of their children has a 25% chance of inheriting the mutant gene from both & having the disorder. X-linked recessive: Mom carries a defective gene on one of her X chromosomes. Each son has a 50% chance of inheriting the X chromosome with the mutant gene & having the disorder; each daughter, 50% of being a carrier. ...Read more

Dr. Damien Luviano
70 doctors shared insights

Blindness (Definition)

Vision impairment and blindness are conditions in which a person cannot see well or see at all, even with glasses or contact lenses. If a person's best vision (with correction) out of either eye is only 20/70 - 20/200, he is impaired. If he can see no better than 20/200 or his visual field is no more than 20 degrees (severe "tunnel" vision), ...Read more


Dr. Tim Conrad
445 doctors shared insights

Loss Of Vision (Definition)

Loss of vision reflects the inability to perceive images. Such a phenotype can be due to occlusive or barriers to light (e.g. cataracts) through retinal alterations (e.g. wet macular degeneration) to optic nerve lesions (e.g. from a pituitary adenoma) to central nervous system ...Read more