Top
20
Doctor insights on: Color Blindness Mode Of Inheritance

Share
1

1
How is color blindness inherited?

How is color blindness inherited?

Sex linked: The most common form is carried on the X chromosome and so it manifests more commonly by far in males who lack a corresponding X (as women do ) to compensate (males have a sort Y chromosome). It is therefore passed on to a male child from his mother who carries a defective X (and most likely a normal X matching it so she is not color deficient.). ...Read more

Dr. David Chandler
78 doctors shared insights

Color Blind (Definition)

Ophthalmologist prefer to use the term color deficit as blindness conveys other meanings. Lowered color perception can be inherited (many forms), can result from advanced loss of retinal cells, inherited retinal disease, and some forms occur due to CNS injury. There are excellent tests for the various types and they can be functionally ...Read more


2

2
What is the rate of occurence for color blindness in various major racial groups?

What is the rate of occurence for color blindness in various major racial groups?

Color blindness: Most color blindness is congenital and linked to the w chromosome. The rate is aound 7 per cent for boys and less than 1 per cent for girls. I am unaware of any racial differences in this incidence. ...Read more

3

3
What the 3 types of sex-linked color blindness?

What the 3 types of sex-linked color blindness?

Color Blindness: The majority of color vision deficiency (note I didn't say blindness as visual acuity is not usually affected) comes from a genetic disturbance causing poor or absent development of one or more familia of cone (color-receptor cell) in the retina. Most sufferers are male, since the genes for color vision reside on the X chromosome, only one of which is present in a male (XY versus XX in a female). ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
Amanda Xi Dr. Xi
8 doctors agreed:
4

4
How does the autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance work?

Amanda Xi Dr. Xi
8 doctors agreed:
How does the autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance work?

See full answer: Every person has 2 copies of every gene -- one from the mother and one from the father. When a disease is caused by a mutation in a gene and it follows an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance, this means that only 1 copy of the mutated gene needs to be inherited to have the disease. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
5

5
What is the frequency of color blindness?

What is the frequency of color blindness?

See below: Congenital color blindness is much more common in males since some (the red and green) of the color photopigments are on the x-chromosome (men only have one [xy] while women have two [xx]). Less than 10% of the population has any form of color blindness (there are several types). Acquired color blindness can be due to macular, optic nerve, or brain disease/trauma. ...Read more

6

6
Is there a type of color blindness where a person has trouble distinguishing shades of blue?

Is there a type of color blindness where a person has trouble distinguishing shades of blue?

Yes: There are two situations in which the blue sensitive cones do not work properly dichromacy is the most severe with complete loss of blue perception. Tritanopia (blue deficient: s cone absent) anomalous trichromacy tritanomaly (blue deficient: s cone defect) the most common color deficiency is red–green (overall) 7 to 10% of the male population. ...Read more

7

7
What is the occurrence of color blindness?

What is the occurrence of color blindness?

8% males 1/2% fem: Color deficiency is mostly an inherited defect of the light receptors with a strong sex linking. Therefore much more common in males. Some cases of lowered color deficiency can occur in global retinal losses such as advancing diabetes and there are a few rare central nervous system color deficiencies as reported by oliver sacks. ...Read more

8

8
Explain the symptoms of color blindness?

Explain the symptoms of color blindness?

Color blindnes: A color blind person does not know of his problem until he compares himself with others. The visual acuity is usually normal. Color recognition is diminished along the axis of confusion for the type of deficiency. If you have this you could not be employed in color dependent occupations such as microcomponent assembly or fruit grading. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
9

9
What's the difference between poor color vision and born with color blindness?

What's the difference between poor color vision and born with color blindness?

Degree: Colorblindness is not necessarily all or nothing. There are varying degrees- thats all. ...Read more

10

10
What sort of disease is color blindness?

What sort of disease is color blindness?

Color vision anomaly: Color blindness is a misnomer, as most color blind people see some colors, they just see the hues differently than the norm. This can be an advantage if looking at camoflage. Our cone cells come in three types to see red, blue and yellow, and the receptors in color vision defect patients are either lacking or at lower levels than i. ...Read more

See 2 more doctor answers
11

11
What is the rate of occurrence of color blindness in the u.S.?

What is the rate of occurrence of color blindness in the u.S.?

About 8%: The standard statistics for inherited color deficiency is about 7.5% in males and 1/2 % in females. This can vary somewhat with different racial groups. The degree of color deficiency and the type are variable so your ophthalmologist can test you and see in which category you are if that is important to you and also give you information about your family possibilities. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
12

12
How many chromosomes are in the color blindness disorder?

Typically one: The mutations in genes affecting color vision are typically on the x-chromosome, but it has been shown that occasionally other chromosomes may be involved (perhaps as many as 20 different ones). Since males have only one x-chromosome (females two), color deficit is much more common in males (second x-chromosome in the female may be normal, to compensate). ...Read more

13

13
How does color deficiency differ from color blindness?

How does color deficiency differ from color blindness?

The same: Color blindness was the original term for conditions in which color recognition was impaired. Since "blindness" is a very charged termed, deficiency has been substituted as the politically correct term since most people with defects in color recognition are not blind at all. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
14

14
What is the rate of occurence for color blindness?

8 %: Color blindness is an inherited deficiency in color recognition which occurs in about 7.5% of males and 1/2% of females. There are some variations in different racial and country groups. It is generally not functionally a problem except for certain occupational groups such as fruit graders, painters, etc. ...Read more

16

16
Nearsightedness is a recessive trait. red-green color blindness is a sex-linked recessive trait, what does this mean?

Nearsightedness is a recessive trait. red-green color blindness is a sex-linked recessive trait, what does this mean?

An Autosomal: Recessive disorder: Both parents are unaffected carriers of a mutant gene. Each of their children has a 25% chance of inheriting the mutant gene from both & having the disorder. X-linked recessive: Mom carries a defective gene on one of her X chromosomes. Each son has a 50% chance of inheriting the X chromosome with the mutant gene & having the disorder; each daughter, 50% of being a carrier. ...Read more

17

17
How does a person inherit the color blindness disorder?

Mutations (changes) : Changes in genes (regulatory elements) in every cell are inherited and may affect color vision. Thede changes are statistically much more significantt in males than females because the latter often have normal color vision genes to compensate. Inhered color blindness thus is more common in males, but color deficit also can result from some eye diseases, in either sex. ...Read more

18

18
Does karyotype of person with color deficiency change?

Does karyotype of person with color deficiency change?

No: Color deficiency is due to a change in the DNA strand. It is not a chromosomal (karyotype) issue. Downs, for instance, is a karyotype problem from an excess of one more chromosome 21s. You cannot tell color deficiency by counting chromosomes or looking for broken chromosomes. ...Read more

19

19
Why am i color blind? What is the cause of color blindness? No one in my family has the gene that causes color blindness.

Blame your Mom: If you have red-green color deficiency, then you carry a defective x-chromosome which you got from your mom (i assume you are a male). Your mom was a carrier so she was color normal and you had a 50% chance of getting the abnormal x from her. So in fact someone in your family, mom, had the gene. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
Dr. Damien Luviano
64 doctors shared insights

Blindness (Definition)

Vision impairment and blindness are conditions in which a person cannot see well or see at all, even with glasses or contact lenses. If a person's best vision (with correction) out of either eye is only 20/70 - 20/200, he is impaired. If he can see no better than 20/200 or his visual field is no more than 20 degrees (severe "tunnel" vision), ...Read more


Dr. Tim Conrad
443 doctors shared insights

Loss Of Vision (Definition)

Loss of vision reflects the inability to perceive images. Such a phenotype can be due to occlusive or barriers to light (e.g. cataracts) through retinal alterations (e.g. wet macular degeneration) to optic nerve lesions (e.g. from a pituitary adenoma) to central nervous system ...Read more