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Doctor insights on: Colon Cancer Location By Age

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20 mm polyp removed during colonoscopy. Likelihood of cancer. Family history of colon cancer.

20 mm polyp removed during colonoscopy. Likelihood of cancer. Family history of colon cancer.

Need more: Information. The type of polyp.who in your family has colon CA, the age of diagnosis and your age ...Read more

Dr. Barry Rosen
4,344 doctors shared insights

Cancer (Definition)

Cancer is a group of diseases that is characterized by uncontrolled cell growth leading to invasion of surrounding tissues that spread to other parts of the body. Cancer can begin anywhere in the body and is usually related to one or more genetic mutations that allow normal cells to become malignant by interfering with internal cellular control mechanisms, such as programmed cell death or by preventing ...Read more


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Is colon cancer and olvarian cancer often related?

Is colon cancer and olvarian cancer often related?

No: Colon Cancer is induced for the most part in non hereditary disease by viral transfection. The most common organism is the polyoma virus. Ovarian cancer is not derived from this viral event. Colon cancer begins in the mucosa of the bowel where ovarian Ca is an epithelial disease similar to that of peritoneal carcinomatosis. The only relationship is when colon metastasizes to ovary. ...Read more

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Is colon cancer removable by a colonoscopy?

Is colon cancer removable by a colonoscopy?

Possibly: We believe most colon cancers progress through a polyp stage. Polyp simply means growth and can be any size or configuration but can be small. Early on a cancer can still be partly a polyp and be removed during colonoscopy. They still need to be evaluated and treated as a cancer however, and it does not necessarily mean the cancer is cured by just removing it as a cancerous polyp. ...Read more

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What is the incidence of colon cancer per age group?

What is the incidence of colon cancer per age group?

Mostly: Occurs after age 50, when screening colonoscopy is recommended. Rarely occurs at your age of 22 as previously discussed here. ...Read more

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Is colon cancer genetic?

Is colon cancer genetic?

Sometimes: Some colon cancers are related to specific genetic mutations but the majority are not. ...Read more

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What % can colon cancer return with ulcerative colitis after cancer tumor is removed from that part of colon ?

What % can colon cancer return with ulcerative colitis after cancer tumor is removed from that part of colon ?

High risk of cancer: Recurrence risk given cancer is a function of the stage of cancer when diagnosed, independent of uc. However, uc patients have an approximately 1% per year risk of new cancer appearing. Because of this high risk, total colectomy has been the standard of care for uc. If you have any colon left, it should be examined and biopsied periodically looking for dysplasia, the precursor of cancerous change. ...Read more

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What are the chances of colorectal cancer at age 37?

Low: Chances are low, but this is not impossible. If you have a strong family history then the chances go up. Most people don't need any screening for colorectal cancer until age 50, or 10 years younger than age of diagnosis for your relative. ...Read more

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What percentage of lynch syndrome patients develop colon polyps by age 60? Not cancer but just polyps

Colon ca, not polyps: Lynch syndrome affects a minority of patients, as it is a rare condition that is often inherited (in about 30% of pts). Of these pts, about 70% will develop colon cancer - most of them by age 60. The risk is high. But the syndrome causes NON-polyp colon cancer, not polyps. It usually requires colon removal (colectomy) to reduce risk. Use HealthTap Prime or talk to your gastroenterologist about sym ...Read more

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What stage of colon cancer is polyp?

What stage of colon cancer is polyp?

Pre-cancerous: Polyp only means a grape like structure protruding into the lumen of an organ. Some cancers appear polypoid. Histologically confirmed benign polyp, by a pathologist, is a pre-cancerous lesion. ...Read more

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What is the frequency of benign colon tumors compared to cancerous tumors?

What is the frequency of benign colon tumors compared to cancerous tumors?

Small and about 5%: Other than for congenital polyposis the majority of lesions arise in a field effect initiated by the polyoma virus. Contrary to the belief that adenomatous polyps convert to malignant polyps and then Ca this occurs in about 5 % of pts. 95% arise from premalignant cells in the viral or carcinogen field. ...Read more

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Why is the colon prone to cancer in hnpcc (hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer)?

Why is the colon prone to cancer in hnpcc (hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer)?

Genetic mutations: HNPCC or hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is an autosomal dominant genetic condition that has a high risk of colon cancer The disease first described by Lynch and is associated with other cancers including endometrial ovary and stomach. The increased risk is due to inherited mutations that impair DNA mismatch repair. .Individuals with HNPCC have an 80% lifetime risk for colon ca. ...Read more

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What's the % of recurrence of a stage iiic colorectal cancer removed by surgery folowed by regional chemo and is possible to recur in a distant organ?

What's the % of recurrence of a stage iiic colorectal cancer removed by surgery folowed by regional chemo and is possible to recur in a distant organ?

See below: Stage iii colorectal cancer 5 year survival ranges 35-65%. Yes, it is possible to have a recurrence as well as distant metastases. Make sure you have a close follow up with your surgeon, so that any recurrence or metastases can be detected and treated as early as possible. Good luck! ...Read more

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I'm concerned about prostate cancer metastasis. Where can prostate cancer spread?

I'm concerned about prostate cancer metastasis. Where can prostate cancer spread?

In theory, prostate cancer cells can spread anywhere in the body: In practice, though, most cases of prostate cancer metastasis occur in the lymph nodes and the bones. Prostate cancer metastasis occurs when cells break away from the tumor in the prostate. The cancer cells can travel through the lymphatic system or the bloodstream to other areas of the body. More commonly prostate cancer metastasis can occur in the: Bones, Lymph nodes, Lungs, Liver, Brain. Rare locations of prostate cancer metastasis include: Adrenal glands, Breasts, Eyes, Kidneys, Muscles, Pancreas, Salivary glands, Spleen. If you've been diagnosed with prostate cancer and you're concerned about prostate cancer metastasis, talk with your doctor about your risk of prostate cancer metastasis and your treatment options. ...Read more

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Colon cancer or colorectal cancer, what's the difference?

Colon cancer or colorectal cancer, what's the difference?

Location: Cancers that arise from the epithelium of the large intestine are similar in most ways whether they are in the colon or rectum. Discussions of "colon cancer" unspecified usually mean "colorectal" unless stated otherwise. Usage, including by me, is often sloppy. ...Read more

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Are colon cancer and rectal cancer the same thing?

Are colon cancer and rectal cancer the same thing?

Somewhat: Colon cancer and rectal caner are usually an adenocarcinoma. They are both located in the large intestine. The difference is that they are treated differently. Sometimes rectal cancer is first treated with radiation and chemotherapy before surgery. Colon cancer often does not use radiation therapy. Both cancers use surgery to remove the cancer. ...Read more

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Chances of metastasis to lung of stage II colon cancer?

Chances of metastasis to lung of stage II colon cancer?

Low but not zero: Stage ii colon cancer means no lymph node involvement by definition, but inadequate lymph node sampling (surgical resection) may "understage" the cancer, so make sure enough ln were taken -minimum of 12! even with appropriate surgery, mets may still occur, although very unusual, so discuss with your treating docs. A pet/ct may give some reassurance so ask if this can be done. ...Read more

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Are colorectal cancer and colon cancer the same thing with different locations?

Are colorectal cancer and colon cancer the same thing with different locations?

Yes and no: Both are adenocarcinomas of the 'large intestine' broadly speaking. However, due to several anatomic differences, colon and rectal cancer behave differently. For that reason the preoperative staging is different and the treatment can be different (surgery +/-chemotherapy for colon cancer, surgery +/- chemoradiation therapy for rectal cancer). The functional outcomes are different as well. ...Read more

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What is the survival rate stage 2a rectal cancer?

What is the survival rate stage 2a rectal cancer?

See below: About 67% of stage 2a rectal cancer patients survive five or more years. See this site for more info. http://www.cancer.org/cancer/colonandrectumcancer/detailedguide/colorectal-cancer-survival-rates. ...Read more

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What are the risk factors for colon cancer?

What are the risk factors for colon cancer?

Heredity: This is the major factor that everyone agrees increases risk, but many colon cancer patients have no family history. Diet and especially meat eating have given contradictory results when studied. Ulcerative colitis and some other illnesses greatly increase risk. Screening is key to surviving colon cancer. ...Read more

Dr. Shari Jackson
13 doctors shared insights

Colon (Definition)

The colon is another term for the large intestine. This is the final portion of the digestive system, responsible for absorbing water and storing stool before evacuation. It is divided into sections described as cecum; ascending, transverse, descending and ...Read more


Dr. Lynne Weixel
12 doctors shared insights

Colonic (Definition)

This is a combining term referring to some condition, treatment or disease of the colon. Such as colonic enema, colonic ...Read more