Top
20
Doctor insights on: Chronic Kidney Failure In The Elderly

Share
1

1
What usually causes acute kidney failure in the elderly?

What usually causes acute kidney failure in the elderly?

Meds and Dehydration: Acute kidney failure occurs predominantly from newly prescribed medications like a diuretic (hctz (hydrochlorothiazide) or lasix) or from certain anti-hypertensive medications like an ace or arb (enalapril or cozaar). Also akf occurs in the elderly if they do not get enough water intake especially in warm environments when they sweat a lot. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer

Kidney (Definition)

The kidneys are paired organs that lie on either side of the vertebral column. Part of their critical functions include the excretion of urine and removal of nitrogenous wastes products from the blood. They regulate acid-base, electrolyte, fluid balance and blood pressure. Through hormonal signals, the kidneys control the ...Read more


2

2
Is the whole kidney affected by chronic kidney failure?

Is the whole kidney affected by chronic kidney failure?

Yes: Chronic kidney disease eventually involves the whole kidney. Disorders may start out in one location, but over time the kidney's adaptive processes lead to damage of all glomeruli and tubules. ...Read more

4

4
Hi, is the metabolic acidosis in chronic renal failure fatal ?

Hi, is the metabolic acidosis in chronic renal failure fatal ?

Acidosis: The simple answer is yes. However, the amount of acid has to be very high for that to happen. High amounts of acid in the blood interfere with many, if not all, biologic processes in the human body such as the effect of Insulin lowering blood sugar, the normal metabolism of proteins and fats that are essential for life, and even normal heart beat, just to name a few. ...Read more

5

5
Is jaundice in renal failure patients and indication of liver failure as well?

Is jaundice in renal failure patients and indication of liver failure as well?

Many causes: Many potential causes of jaundice but not renal failure alone and haudice does not equate to liver failure causes and be meds, viral, infection, gallstones , etc extensive lab and ultrasound or cat scan would be needed to determine cause. ...Read more

6

6
What is metabolic acidosis in chronic renal failure from?

What is metabolic acidosis in chronic renal failure from?

Unable to remove: Metabolic acidosis is a constituent of renal failure, arising mainly from the inability of kidney to remove excess acids in blood. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
8

8
Why is the manufacturing of erythropoeitin impaired in a patient with chronic renal disease?

Why is the manufacturing of erythropoeitin impaired in a patient with chronic renal disease?

Eruthropoietin: It is secreted by the kidneys, simply. When kidneys fail, all functions are reduced. Industrial production of erythrop works as good as the natural one. ...Read more

9

9
Can morphine in a esld patient cause hepatic coma, renal failure and ultimately death?

No: Hepatic coma is from the buildup of toxins not being processed by the damaged liver...Which can poison the kidneys...And eventually result in death. Morphine or other narcotics may be given to an esld patient to reduce their discomfort as they are passing. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
10

10
Can acute kidney failure recover even if the the kidney shrunk and has igan?

Can acute kidney failure recover even if the the kidney shrunk and has igan?

Not likely: Once the kidney has become smaller there is scar tissue within that represents irreversible damage, regardless of which disease is involved. If some kidney function returns it is not likely to be normal and careful attention to preservation of the amount that is retained will be extremely important. ...Read more

11

11
How common is renal failure in myeloma patients?

How common is renal failure in myeloma patients?

30% dx; 50% life: Around 30% at diagnosis and about 50% throughout disease course. However, this may be less given newer anti-myeloma agents (?). ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
12

12
What are the acceptable potassium levels in a patient with chronic kidney disea?

What are the acceptable potassium levels in a patient with chronic kidney disea?

3.5 to 5.0-5.5: Generally, the potassium should be kept within normal limits just as for a person without renal disease. Most labs have a normal range of 3.5 on the low end and may be anywhere from 5 to 5.5 on the high end. Potassium is less well eliminated by patients with kidney disease and generally with advanced kidney disease, the potassium intake must be reduced. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
15

15
How is chronic renal failure managed well in diabetics?

How is chronic renal failure managed well in diabetics?

See below: In any kidney disease it is important to control blood presssure .If uncontrolled it will lead to more rapid loss of function no matter what the underlying cause.Use of certain medications like ace inhibitors are preferentially used, ask your doctor. Blood sugar , cholesterol control and exercise all help. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
16

16
Can acute kidney failure recover even if the kidney shrunk and has igan?

Depends : If your ultrasound shows shrunken or small kidneys then there could be considerable fibrosis which is not reversible. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
17

17
What's the safest class of antihypertensive in chronic renal failure?

What's the safest class of antihypertensive in chronic renal failure?

Renal failure: Calcium channel-blockers, beta blockers, and diuretics are used most in renal failure to treat hypertension. In such patients, BP is typically quite volume dependent. ...Read more

18

18
How are acute and chronic kidney failure different?

How are acute and chronic kidney failure different?

Acute: recent: In gral. "acute" means of "recent" origen, and "chronic" means "old" or less recent. Some classifications use 6 months for "subacute". Chronic renal failure is insidious and depends upon the cause and how fast it gets worst. Acute renal failure usually is caused by low fluid volume in the body either dehydration or bleeding or it may be caused by toxins (poison, medications , dye contrast). ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
19

19
What is the critical blood pressure for patients with chronic kidney disease?

What is the critical blood pressure for patients with chronic kidney disease?

Best blood pressure: It depends on what is causing your ckd. Patients without diabetes should have their systolic BP < 140 mm hg. Those with diabetes should try to have a systolic of 130 mm hg. The lower your blood pressure, without symptoms of dizziness or weakness, the fewer complications one can expect to have. Discuss your particular case with your physician or have have him refer you to a nephrologist. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
20

20
What is the cause of sudden fever intermittent in patient with renal failure?

What is the cause of sudden fever intermittent in patient with renal failure?

Need a lot more info: You've given too little detail, so you'll need to provide us with more. When you say renal failure, do you mean end-stage renal disease, acute renal failure, chronic renal failure, or something else? What other things are happening with the patient besides the occasional fever? What region of the world is the patient in? Any other concomitant illnesses? How high is the fever? ...Read more

Dr. Tarek Naguib
600 doctors shared insights

Kidney Failure (Definition)

A condition in which your kidneys suddenly stop working normally. Since your kidneys remove waste products and help balance water and salt and other minerals (electrolytes) in your blood, when your kidneys stop working, waste products, fluids, and electrolytes build up in your body. This can cause problems ...Read more


Dr. Fred McCurdy
361 doctors shared insights

Esrd (Definition)

End stage renal disease (ESRD) = final stage ...Read more