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Doctor insights on: Cholinesterase Inhibitors

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Dr. Krishna Kumar
31 doctors shared insights

Cholinesterase Inhibitors (Overview)

An acetylcholinesterase inhibitor or anti-cholinesterase is a chemical that inhibits the acetylcholinesterase enzyme from breaking down acetylcholine, thereby increasing both the level and duration of action of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine.


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What is the definition or description of: cholinesterase inhibitors?

What is the definition or description of: cholinesterase inhibitors?

See below: An acetylcholinesterase inhibitor or anti-cholinesterase is a chemical that inhibits the acetylcholinesterase enzyme from breaking down acetylcholine, thereby increasing both the level and duration of action of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. ...Read more

Dr. Krishna Kumar
31 doctors shared insights

Cholinesterase Inhibitors (Overview)

An acetylcholinesterase inhibitor or anti-cholinesterase is a chemical that inhibits the acetylcholinesterase enzyme from breaking down acetylcholine, thereby increasing both the level and duration of action of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine.


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Wanted to know if acetyl cholinesterase inhibitors can cause constriction of the eye pupil?

Wanted to know if acetyl cholinesterase inhibitors can cause constriction of the eye pupil?

Yes: cholinesterase inhibitors for topical use in glaucoma treatment enhance the effect of endogenously liberated acetylcholine in iris, ciliary muscle, and other parasympathetically innervated structures of the eye. It thereby causes miosis, increase in facility of outflow of aqueous humor, fall in intraocular pressure, and potentiation of accommodation. ...Read more

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How do cholinesterase inhibitors affect tau proteins and beta amyloid that form in Alzheimer's disease?

How do cholinesterase inhibitors affect tau proteins and beta amyloid that form in Alzheimer's disease?

They don't: The cholinesterase inhibitor group of drugs are not disease modifying agents, and merely improve synaptic connections by preserving the lower levels of acetylcholine in the brain. However, there is no direct or indirect effect on the tau or amyloid presence. ...Read more

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What type of doctor can prescribe a Cholinesterase inhibitor, is it a psychiatric? Neurological?

What type of doctor can prescribe a Cholinesterase inhibitor, is it a psychiatric? Neurological?

One with a licence: Any Doctor with a license to Prescribe medication can can Prescribe these medication. For example a Primary Care Doctor, a Geriatrician, an internist, a Neurologist, a Psychiatrist, etc. These medications are mainly used for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease and dementia, but they have many other uses too. Certainly, a Neurologist would usually be the most educated/learned type of physician to. ...Read more

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How can Alzheimer's disease be related to cholinesterase inhibition?

Treatment: Several medications used to treat alzheimers, e.g. Donepezil and rivastigmine, are cholinesterase inhibitors. These medications increase the level of acetylcholine in the brain. Low levels of acetycholine in certain areas of the brain are associated with alzheimer's. ...Read more

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What are cox-2 inhibitors?

What are cox-2 inhibitors?

Pain med: Cox-2 (cyclooxygenase-2) is an enzyme that makes the prostaglandins which increase inflammation, pain and fever. So a cox-2 inhibitor is, in effect, a pain blocker. ...Read more

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What exactly are cox-1 and cox-2 inhibitors?

What exactly are cox-1 and cox-2 inhibitors?

Different: Cox-1 (cyclooxygenase-1) is an enzyme that regulates prostaglandins, and is important for a healthy stomach lining and kidneys. Inhibition turns this off, leading to gastrointestinal bleeding. Cox-2 (cyclooxygenase-2) is an enzyme that makes the prostaglandins which increase inflammation, pain and fever. So a cox-2 inhibitor is, in effect, a pain blocker. ...Read more

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What are neuron inhibitors? Examples?

What are neuron inhibitors? Examples?

Come again?: Are you asking about endogenous substances like inhibitory neurotransmitters or exogenous substances (drugs)? Physicians and neuroscientists don't generally think in the terms in which you've framed your question. Put another way, your question is too vague. Try reposting it with a more specific (and longer) description of what question you're trying to get answered. ...Read more