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Doctor insights on: Chickenpox Children And Teenagers

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Dr. James Ferguson
722 doctors shared insights

Chickenpox (Definition)

Caused by the varicella-zoster virus, chicken pox results in a blister rash that starts on the stomach, back, and face and spreads throughout the entire body. These small itchy blisters eventually scab over. Associated symptoms include itching, fatigue, malaise, and a fever. The most effective method to prevent spreading of the varicella virus is ...Read more


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Hi. I had chicken pox as a teenager ): - They left a few marks on my face & I am trying everything, what would you recommend?

Hi. I had chicken pox as a teenager ): - They left a few marks on my face & I am trying everything, what would you recommend?

Dermatology: evaluation for all scars. Multiple excellent therapies are available; however, must be examined and treated by a dermatologist. ...Read more

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Why do adults and older children get sicker than younger children with chickenpox?

Why do adults and older children get sicker than younger children with chickenpox?

Good question !!: The viral infection is systemic and adults for some reason are more susceptible to brain and lung involvement. ...Read more

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I have never had chickenpox and test showed no immunity, both my children had it when they were young so does that mean i will never get it ?

I have never had chickenpox and test showed  no immunity, both my children had it when they were young so does that mean i will never get it ?

No.: Not at all. If testing shows that you have no antibodies to the virus, you could get chickenpox at any time in the future, if you are exposed to it. You could get the chickenpox vaccine; but a better idea, at your age, might be to get the shingles vaccine, which immunizes you against both chickenpox and shingles. (they are caused by the same virus.) ask your doctor about it. ...Read more

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In cases of dryscabs from chickenpox is it safe to be around others and including children?

In cases of dryscabs from chickenpox is it safe to be around others and including children?

Droplet/contact: Chickenpox can be spread by airborn droplets inhaled into the lung or contact with contaminated material ( secretions or debris from blisters). Infected kids are contagious from the day before until 6-7 days after they begin to break out. If all lesions are crusted & dry & the time frame is right, they are safe to be around. ...Read more

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Is a chickenpox party a good idea to infect children early?

Is a chickenpox party a good idea to infect children early?

Emphatically No: The old notion of exposing children at an early age to chicken pox is fine as long as the child does not suffer from any of the very serious , albeit rare, complications of chicken pox which includes death. Who would want to gamble with their child's survival even with low odds? Be smart and prevent chicken pox by immunizing! ...Read more

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Can children get chickenpox from some one with the shingles even if they had the shots?

Can children get chickenpox from some one with the shingles even if they had the shots?

Maybe: A single dose of the vaccine is considered 85% protective while two doses bring this up to 95% or better.Those with shingles are not as likely to spread the virus because it does not enter their saliva or become airborne by coughing. Only the debris from the sores is infectious, and avoidance can limit spread. ...Read more

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What are the chances of my children getting chickenpox after being exposed, and they have all had the vaccine?

What are the chances of my children getting chickenpox after being exposed, and they have all had the vaccine?

Chicken pox after va: Chicken ox after varicella vaccine can happen rarely if the vaccine was not stored at the proper temperature due to some reason breakthrough infection caused by wild type varicella virus but even if you get the disease it is quite mild. ...Read more

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I am an adult who has never had chickenpox. Is there a vaccine i can get? My neighbor's children recently came down with chickenpox. I'm afraid i might catch it as an adult. What can I do to prevent infection? .

I am an adult who has never had chickenpox. Is there a vaccine i can get? My neighbor's children recently came down with chickenpox. I'm afraid i might catch it as an adult. What can I do to prevent infection?

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The : The following information is taken from the us cdc: varicella (chickenpox) is a highly contagious disease that is very uncomfortable and sometimes serious. The chickenpox vaccine is the best protection against chickenpox. The vaccine is made from weakened varicella virus that produces an immune response in your body that protects you against chickenpox. The chickenpox vaccine was licensed for use in the United States in 1995. Since then, the vaccine has become widely used. Thanks to the chickenpox vaccine, the number of people who get chickenpox each year as well as hospitalizations and deaths from chickenpox have gone down dramatically in the United States. Persons aged >13 years persons aged >13 years without evidence of varicella immunity should receive two 0.5-ml doses of single-antigen varicella vaccine administered subcutaneously, 4--8 weeks apart. If >8 weeks elapse after the first dose, the second dose may be administered without restarting the schedule. Only single-antigen varicella vaccine may be used for vaccination of persons in this age group. Mmrv is not licensed for use among persons aged >13 years. School-aged children, college students, and students in other postsecondary educational institutions all students should be assessed for varicella immunity, and those without evidence of immunity should routinely receive 2 doses of single-antigen varicella vaccine 4--8 weeks apart. The risk for transmission of varicella among school-aged children, college students, and students in other postsecondary educational institutions can be high because of high contact rates. Other adults all healthy adults should be assessed for varicella immunity, and those who do not have evidence of immunity should receive 2 doses of single-antigen varicella vaccine 4--8 weeks apart. Adults who might be at increased risk for exposure or transmission and who do not have evidence of immunity should receive special consideration for vaccination, including 1) hcp, 2) household contacts of immunocompromised persons, 3) persons who live or work in environments in which transmission of VZV is likely (e.g., teachers, day-care employees, residents and staff in institutional settings), 4) persons who live or work in environments in which transmission has been reported (e.g., college students, inmates and staff members of correctional institutions, and military personnel), 5) nonpregnant women of childbearing age, 6) adolescents and adults living in households with children, and 7) international travelers. ...Read more

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Dr. Marshall Seligmann
85 doctors shared insights

Children And Teenagers (Definition)

Children and teenagers are young people: everyone up to ...Read more