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Doctor insights on: Chancroid Treatment

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Dr. Amrita Dosanjh
13 doctors shared insights

Chancroid (Definition)

It is a sexually transmitted, acute, ulcerative disease of the vulva. It is painful. It is caused by the bacteria haemophilus ducreyi. The incubation period is short 3-6 days. The initial lesion is small, but evolves over the next 2-3 days into the ulcer. The ulcers are painful , and can ...Read more


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What are symptoms of chancroid?

What are symptoms of chancroid?

Ulcers pus Lg nodes: It is a sexually transmitted disease from tropical and subtropical areas usually associated with drug use, prostitution, syphilis and aids. Large genital ulcers and large painful pus filled inguinal lymph nodes are seen. Still fairly rare in us, although with aids, it is more common...And it hurts, and you can pass it on....If you think you have it consider going to the state health department. ...Read more

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How do I differentiate between syphillis chancre and chancroid?

How do I differentiate between syphillis chancre and chancroid?

Many differences: The syphilitic ulcer has a hard base which is non-tender, has a well-defined edge and will, with time, disappear on its own. The chancroid ulcer has a soft base, is quite tender and may look inflamed, and has ragged shaggy edges. You should not try to make this diagnosis yourself, but see a doctor, because if you have one std the odds are good that you have more than one. Get tested. ...Read more

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Bumps/sores looking like my skin was scraped/burned off (looks like chancroid) almost a month since it appeared, not healing, but can it spread?

Bumps/sores looking like my skin was scraped/burned off (looks like chancroid) almost a month since it appeared,  not healing, but can it spread?

Unsure: That's difficult to determine from your question. I would really want to see it; possibly culture or biopsy the area and find out what it is. Being that we don't know what it is I would say avoid sex until a physician determines what it is. ...Read more

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What is chancroid?

What is chancroid?

An STD w/ ulcers: Refer to following site for info on chancroid: http://www.Ncbi.Nlm.Nih.Gov/pubmedhealth/pmh0001659/. ...Read more

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What is the definition or description of: chancroid?

What is the definition or description of: chancroid?

Ulcer: It is a sexually transmitted, acute, ulcerative disease of the vulva. It is painful. It is caused by the bacteria haemophilus ducreyi. The incubation period is short 3-6 days. The initial lesion is small, but evolves over the next 2-3 days into the ulcer. The ulcers are painful , and can be treated with antibiotics. ...Read more

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How to know if herpes or chancroid?

Chancroid is rare...: Chancroid is somewhat rare in the USA. In fact, most STD treatment centers do not have the lab capability to diagnose it. Almost all painful genital ulcers are herpes. But...the criteria for suspician of chancroid are 1) One or more painful genital ulcers 2) No laboratory evidence of syphilis 3) Tests for herpes are negative 3) the clinical presentation is typical for Chancroid. Best Wishes! ...Read more

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How do I differentiate between syphilis and chancroid?

How do I differentiate between syphilis and chancroid?

Genital ulcers: Herpes, syphilis, donovanosis and chancroid cause genital ulcers. In the us, genital herpes is the most common. A diagnosis of chancroid is a little tricky b/c test not widely available. Having both a painful genital ulcer and tender swelling in the groin raises the possibility of chancroid (in setting of negative syphilis and herpes testing). Hiv test should also be done. See md for evaluation. ...Read more

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How can you differentiate between syphilis and chancroid?

How can you differentiate between syphilis and chancroid?

Depends: Syphilis is usually painless ulcers while chancroid can be very painfull. This is not always the case. Sometimes the infections can coexists. For syphilis blood work is best way to rule out the disease. For chancroid special cultures are needed form the ulcers. ...Read more