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Doctor insights on: Cervical Rib Syndrome

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Can first rib fracture cause thoracic outlet syndrome?

Can first rib fracture cause thoracic outlet syndrome?

1st rib fx & TOS: Trauamtic 1st rib fractures can contribute to TOS especially when there is a non-union (fracture pieces do not heal back together as one unit. Pieces press on vessels & nerves). Hemorrhage from the fracture into the thoracic outlet can also contribute to TOS (compression of vessels & nerves by blood). ...Read more

Cervical (Definition)

Cervical relates to the first seven vertebra of the spine. It is related it the neck. Also it refers to the muscular opening/exit of ...Read more


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Thoracic outlet syndrome causes arm/neck pain how?

Thoracic outlet syndrome causes arm/neck pain how?

Crowding: Pressure on brachial plexus the nerves from the spinal cord to arm become a group of nerves called the brachial plexus it is compressed by a crowding from an extra rib on top of the rib cage 1st rib or extra cervical rib the working theory goes adfitionally vascular compression of brachial artery or vein can produce arm symptoms nerve pain can extend proximal to neck or distal to arm and hand. ...Read more

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What does this mean: cervical rib and thoracic outlet syndrome?

What does this mean: cervical rib and thoracic outlet syndrome?

Nerves are pinched: Thoracic outlet is the result of the big nerves and blood vessels in the neck and chest being pinched by the muscles and bones at the top of the rib cage as they exit towards the arms. A cervical rib is just one cause of this problem. It can be treated with physical therapy or surgery. ...Read more

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Is carpal tunnel syndrome linked with bulging cervical discs?

Is carpal tunnel syndrome linked with bulging cervical discs?

No: Carapal tunnel refers to the "tunnel" through which the median nerve travels as it enters the hand at the wrist. This is a site of compression on the median nerve and is considered a focal entrapment neuropathy. Pinched nerves at the neck from bulging discs are a different location entirely. ...Read more

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How can snapping scapula syndrome and thoracic outlet syndrome be related?

How can snapping scapula syndrome and thoracic outlet syndrome be related?

Muscle imbalances: Imo tos results from superior trapezius (st) weak & collar bone droops toward first rib closing costoclavicular space (between these bones) clipping artery & nerves to arm. Weak st conscripts neighbor levator scapulae (ls) to burden lifting scapula (sc) & 20 lb. Arm. Long & narrow, ls incurs chronic spasm, tendonitis at insertion on superior sc spine (pick-like), & snapping as shoulder rotates. ...Read more

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If scapular instability is the cause of thoracic outlet syndrome, would rib resection/scalenectomy resolve neck & scapula pain?

If scapular instability is the cause of thoracic outlet syndrome, would rib resection/scalenectomy resolve neck & scapula pain?

More complex: Thoracic outlet syndrome surgery includes, often, first rib resection and/or scalenectomy, but there are different surgical approaches and also, pectoralis minor decompressions. Scapular instability may or may not be present, and this may represent problems in the upper brachial plexus. Since this is so individualized and particular in most cases, best to discuss with experienced vascular surg. ...Read more

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Whats thoracic outlet syndrome?

Whats thoracic outlet syndrome?

TOS: Tos involves the lower portion of the brachial plexus, where nerves from the neck pass through a tunnel into the chest on the way to the arm. The plexus can get trapped in the outlet area, and this event can cause pain, numbness, tingling, weakness, but can also affect blood vessels. On occasion, a congenital first rib can cause compression but trauma may also promote tos. ...Read more

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Is thoracic outlet syndrome fatal?

No.: There is no known mortality associated with thoracic outlet syndrome, but complications can arise during surgical treatment. ...Read more

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What is the link between a ?Cervical rib and thoracic outlet syndrome?

What is the link between a ?Cervical rib and thoracic outlet syndrome?

Varies: Many people remain asymptomatic with a cervical rib. The most severe complication is thoracic outlet syndrome caused by compression of the brachial plexus (weakness in affected arm) and/or subclavian artery (decreased pulses in affected arm). ...Read more

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How serious is pain under the collarbone associated with thoracic outlet syndrome?

Maybe transient: Many cases of tos respond to physical therapy, feldenkreis postural therapies, or even chiropractic. Therefore, presence of pain is merely a symptom and can potentially be reversed. Only about 10-15% of patients are considered surgical candidates, but with newer techniques, outcomes are highly favourable these days if patients have positive EMG studies. ...Read more

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What is thoracic outlet syndrome?

What is thoracic outlet syndrome?

Narrowing of space: Thoracic outlet syndrome is narrowng of the space between the first rib and the anterior scalene muscle. The axillary vein and artery and brachial plexus nerve passes through this space. Narowing the space can pinch the artery, vein, nerve or all of the above. Also, a rare, abnormal cervical rib can cause the same problems. ...Read more

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Is thoracic outlet syndrome and pinched nerves the same?

Is thoracic outlet syndrome and pinched nerves the same?

Related: The thoracic outlet contains both a collection of nerves like the brachial plexus and blood vessels serving the arms. Any compromise of the to can cause symptoms affecting both the nerves and circulation by compression of either or both causing similar sensations of cold, numbness and tingling. Simple exercises such as wall push-ups can sometimes yield some relief. See a physical therapist or dr. ...Read more

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Dr. Timothy Wu Dr. Wu
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Can thoracic outlet syndrome or any other brachial plexus issues cause scapular instability/winging?

Dr. Timothy Wu Dr. Wu
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Winged Scapula: A "winged scapula" is a result of injury to the long thoracic nerve which innervates the serratus anterior muscle. The long thoracic nerve is made up of portions of the brachial plexus, namely cervical roots 5, 6, 7, so in theory, a brachial plexus injury can cause a winged scapula but it is unlikely to be in isolation of other nerve problems. Winged scapula is not typical in thoracic outlet. ...Read more

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Tcan you have cervical facet joint syndrome and occipital neuralgia

Tcan you have cervical facet joint syndrome and occipital  neuralgia

Yes: and Yes. Sometimes the facet joint nerves can connect with the occipital nerve causing both. Sometimes they are separate issues altogether. ...Read more

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Can cervical radiculopathy and intervertebral disc disorder with myelopathy, cervical region cause bladder problems?"

Can cervical radiculopathy and intervertebral disc disorder with myelopathy, cervical region cause bladder problems?"

Yes, it can: Based on the information provided -- intervertebral disc disorder with myelopathy in the cervical region can cause bladder dysfunction as the spinal cord is compressed by the disc. ...Read more

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What is thoracic outlet syndrome release?

What is thoracic outlet syndrome release?

Surgery: Thoracic outlet surgery is done to remove pressure or compression of the nerve, artery, and vein going to the arm. This involves removing the first rib, and releasing any scar tissue present. This results in significant reduction in symptoms in most cases. ...Read more

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Is slipping rib syndrome related to hypermobility syndrome in any way?

Possibly: Slipping rib syndrome is also known as tietze's syndrome. As like any joint, if you have increased flexibility, your ribs can easily move in and out of place as well. ...Read more

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Having thoracic outlet syndrome issues because of first rib cartilage/ligament tear. Rib moves and irritates nerves. What can I do?

Having thoracic outlet syndrome issues because of first rib cartilage/ligament tear.  Rib moves and irritates nerves.  What can I do?

Testing: You should schedule an appointment with a neurologist. He or she can do a thorough exam and an emg. Do nut rush for a surgical treatment until these are done. ...Read more

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