Top
20
Doctor insights on: Cerebellar Degeneration Syndrome

Share
1

1
How are cerebellar degeneration, cerebellar ataxia and paraneoplastic cerebellar related?

How are cerebellar degeneration, cerebellar ataxia and paraneoplastic cerebellar related?

Ataxia: Cerebellar degneration means that the part of the brain that controlls coordination and balance is losing cells and likely getting smaller. Ataxia is the clumsiness, imbalance, slurred speech and/or abnormal eye movements that can accompany cerebellar degeneration. A paraneoplastic cerebellar syndrome is when the body's immune response to cancer somewhere else damages the cerebellum "by mistake". ...Read more

Cerebellum (Definition)

An area in the back of the brain that helps coordinate movement, speech, and eye movements. It has connections to the frontal lobes also and may play a role in helping you ...Read more


2

2
Is cerebellar degeneration terminal?

Is cerebellar degeneration terminal?

It can be: In a young person of 36 this is evidence of some kind of genetically determined cause. One cause is vitamin b1 dependency. This is like dietary deficiency but requires huge doses of the vitamin. Stay away from all forms of sugar and sweeteners. ...Read more

3

3
What are ataxia, cerebellar or spinocerebellar degeneration?

What are ataxia,  cerebellar or spinocerebellar degeneration?

Progressive disorder: Genetic and familial conditions can lead to a progressive degeneration of the cerebellum and brainstem structures. There are many different types. Multiple sclerosis can also cause progressive balance problems that can mimic degenerative disease. Tumors can also mimic degenerative disease. A quality MRI and good neurological evaluation is necessary. ...Read more

4

4
Syndrome of optic atrophy?

Syndrome of optic atrophy?

Optic nerve damage: Optic atrophy refers to changes in the appearance of the optic nerve. The optic disc (where the optic nerve enters the eye) appears pale or whitish vs. The normal pink color. The presence of optic atrophy means there is damage to the optic nerve. This can occur with many different diseases (except glaucoma). The degree of visual loss depends on the severity of the optic nerve damage. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
5

5
What is alcoholic cerebellar degeneration?

What is alcoholic cerebellar degeneration?

Special case: In people who have drunk a lot of alcohol, the upper half of the middle ("vermis") of the cerebellum shrinks ("superior vermal atrophy"), telling the radiologist or pathologist about alcohol use. Beyond contributing some to the overall clumsiness and perhaps personality problems of longtime heavy drinkers, this is not really an entity in itself. ...Read more

6

6
Is carpal tunnel syndrome linked with bulging cervical discs?

Is carpal tunnel syndrome linked with bulging cervical discs?

No: Carapal tunnel refers to the "tunnel" through which the median nerve travels as it enters the hand at the wrist. This is a site of compression on the median nerve and is considered a focal entrapment neuropathy. Pinched nerves at the neck from bulging discs are a different location entirely. ...Read more

See 2 more doctor answers
7

7
Explain the condition called sudden loss of coordination (cerebellar ataxia).?

Explain the condition called sudden loss of coordination (cerebellar ataxia).?

Cerebellar Ataxia: Acute cerebellar ataxia is defined as the sudden loss of coordination or abnormal gait due to abnormal function of the cerebellum. Causes are vast, and include tumors, infectious diseases, and genetic (inherited) etiologies. This is best managed by a neurologist (specialist in the nervous system). ...Read more

8

8
Is cerebellar atrophy fatal?

Is cerebellar atrophy fatal?

No: Cerebellar atrophy can be associated with long term Phenytoin use and alcohol consumption. It by itself is not a fatal condition ...Read more

9

9
What is progressive neuro-degenerative disease or any neuro-degenerative or atrophy cerebellar diseases or mental diseases?

Example: Neurodegenerative illnesses that affect the cerebellum may be the different forms of multiple system atrophy, such as OPCA. Other neurodegenerative illnesses (that do not affect the cerebellum) include Alzheimers, Parkinsons, and ALS. ...Read more

10

10
Contemplating surgery. I have type II diabetes, depression, carpal tunnel syndrome, peripheral neuropathy. Abnormal nerve conduction Multileveled bilateral acute on chronic cervical radiculopathy.Correlate EMG findings with cervical spine MRI. Severe sens

Contemplating surgery. I have type II diabetes, depression, carpal tunnel syndrome, peripheral neuropathy. Abnormal nerve conduction Multileveled bilateral acute on chronic cervical radiculopathy.Correlate EMG findings with cervical spine MRI. Severe sens

Double Crush: Sounds like you may have what's known as "double crush" phenomenon. Both cervical spine and entrapment of the ulnar/median nerve causing symptoms. Certainly, carpal tunnel and/or cubital tunnel release is easier and less risky than neck surgery and usually considered before neck surgery. Unfortunately, diabetes puts you at high risk for recurrence of carpal/cubital tunnel syndrome. ...Read more

See 5 more doctor answers
11

11
What is posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome?

What is posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome?

Allergic brain rxn: Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (pres) is often only an MRI finding of increased signal in temporal, parietal, and occipital brain regions. The main correlate of pres is a history of having received immunotherapy. In association with alzheimer's trials, this is called aria for amyloid related imaging abnormalities. ...Read more

12

12
Which peripheral nerves are affected with guillain barre syndrome ?

Which peripheral nerves are affected with guillain barre syndrome ?

Affected nerves are:: Any peripheral sensory-motor branch of nerves that affect the anterior musculature of the leg and foot. Becuase gb causes upper motor nerve disruption of muscular function, the most affected nerves are those in the lower leg and foot that are part of the "swing" phase of gait, namely the extensor muscle of the foot and anterior tibialis muscle. The nerve roots affected are l3-l4-l5-s1. ...Read more

13

13
What's olivopontine cerebellar atrophy?

What's olivopontine cerebellar atrophy?

Degenerative disease: A large group of sporadic and inherited disorders with symptom onset in the 5th decade of life. Main manifestations include ataxia, first in the legs then arms, hands and facial muscles.Characterized by extensive degeneration of the cerebellum, pontine nuclei and medullary olivary nuclei, opca's have been described with many other clinical findings. Treatment is symtom specific and variable. ...Read more

14

14
What are frey syndrome, horner's syndrome and shy-drager syndrome?

What are frey syndrome, horner's syndrome and shy-drager syndrome?

What do they have in: They all have abnormalities of autonomics and other nervous sytem problems. ...Read more

15

15
What is rare anterior ethmoid nerve syndrome?

What is rare anterior ethmoid nerve syndrome?

Headache Variant: Anterior ethmoid nerve syndromes is a series of symptoms resulting from irritation of the terminal branches of the anterior ethmoidal nerve. The referred pains arising from this nerve are chiefly of the sinus type but may also take the form of headache, sometimes of a migrainous character. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
16

16
Is patellofemoral syndrome typically associated with marfan's syndrome?

Is patellofemoral syndrome typically associated with marfan's syndrome?

PFS can happen: Marfan syndrome patients can get aches and pains in many joints because of the looser ligaments trying to hold the joints together at rest and under physical stress. Patellofemoral syndrome is common in normal, active school-aged children, so it is hard to tell whether or not it occurs more often in marfan syndrome kids. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
17

17
What is alcohol cerebellar degeneration like?

What is alcohol cerebellar degeneration like?

Cerebellar degenerat: Learn to try to search by search engines, "google it", then if not satisfied, contact us again. This subject is too broad to reply in a few words. ...Read more

18

18
Mrireport l4l5disc bulge bilatral lumberlordosis lost spondylosis deformanswithdddwith cauda equina compression and bilateral compresive radiculopathy?

Mrireport l4l5disc bulge bilatral lumberlordosis lost spondylosis deformanswithdddwith cauda equina compression and bilateral compresive radiculopathy?

MRI report: This means you have some spinal arthritis with some nerve compression (lateral compression) and some central compression of the caudal equine (where other defending nerves travel). There is also loss of the normal lumbar lordosis curve which may signify back spasm. This can only be interpreted based on your symptoms and neurological exam. Hope this helps! ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
19

19
What is arnold chiari syndrome?

What is arnold chiari syndrome?

Malformation: Chiari described different defects of the cerebellum. Arnold added details of a very specific malformation (chiari type 2). Low lying tonsils with elongation of medulla, kinking of fourth ventricle with obstruction, and associated fusing of thalamus, hydrocephalus, peaking of quadrigeminal plate, etc. Associated with spinal bifida. Sorry you asked? ...Read more

20

20
Does chronic alcoholism cause macular degeneration in children?

Does chronic alcoholism cause macular degeneration in children?

Macular degeneration: The usual risk factors are positive family history, cigarette smoking, far sightedness, light iris color, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, female gender, heart disease , and of course aging. To my knowledge alcoholism in a parent doesn't cause macular degeneration in their children, unless the above risk factors apply to the children. ...Read more

See 2 more doctor answers
Dr. Walter Husar
24 doctors shared insights

Cerebellar Degeneration (Definition)

degeneration= deterioration of the cerebellum, due to ...Read more