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Doctor insights on: Causes Of Acute Intermittent Porphyria

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In regards to acute intermittent porphyria, what causes abdominal pain?

In regards to acute intermittent porphyria, what causes abdominal pain?

Great question: AIP causes an axonal neuropathy which starts in proximal arms but spreads throughout limbs, and likely throughout the body. During the cramping attacks, there is an increase in delta-aminolevulinic acid and porphobiilnogen which likely stimulates abnormal nerve activity within the gut. ...Read more

Dr. Aletha Tippett
89 doctors shared insights

Porphyria (Definition)

The porphyrias are metabolic disorders caused by abnormalities in the synthesis of heme, the portion of hemoglobin which carries the iron inside red blood cells. The manifestations of porphyria vary considerably depending on the mutation involved, ranging from light sensitivity to liver failure to nerve damage to bouts of terrible pain. Special testing is required to ...Read more


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Can acute intermittent porphyria cause mental illness or psychosis?

Can acute intermittent porphyria cause mental illness or psychosis?

Short answer- YES: The diagnosis of AIP should always be in the differential diagnosis of a person who becomes psychotic& who fits a certain clinical profile which usually includes vague GI symptoms and abdominal pain unexplained neuropathy, and other characteristic symptoms. Feel free to write me more questions on this topic and I'll be happy to answer: www.healthtap.com/drsaghafi ...Read more

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Do you have to have abdominal pain if you have acute intermittent porphyria? What are all the symptoms?

Do you have to have abdominal pain if you have acute intermittent porphyria? What are all the symptoms?

It's a mix: Acute intermitent porphyria should be suspected when mental illness, bad constipation, abdominal pain, low sodium, or a neuropathy are found without obvious explanation. Any one of these should trigger suspicion. The tests are often done wrong because of problems with collecting the specimens. ...Read more

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What are the differences between porphyria and aip (acute intermittent porphyria)?

Classification: Porphyria is a general term for a host of conditions, and acute intermittent porphyria is a variety of a more common variation in this disease category. ...Read more

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Can you tell me about the difference between porphyria and aip (acute intermittent porphyria)?

See below: Please consult this site for an explanation of this group of disorders. http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/porphyria/basics/definition/con-20028849 ...Read more

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Are there any good treatments for acute intermittent porphyria?

Are there any good treatments for acute intermittent porphyria?

Avoid triggers: Glucose and hematin work so-so for the acute attacks; the key to managing this treacherous illness (after making the diagnosis) is to learn what triggers the attacks and to avoid it. Sometime as simple as an old-fashioned barbiturate "to relax" can be deadly. Truly undestand the process and life can be enjoyed fully. ...Read more

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Can acute porphyria cause problems with fine motor skills?

Can acute porphyria cause problems with fine motor skills?

Acute porphyria: Muscle weakness can be a symptom can comes with exacerbation of acute intermittent porphyria. Fine motor skill difficulties alone is unlikely to be the result of acute porphyria. See your PCP for any concerns about fine motor skills. Here is info on acute intermittent porphyria. http://www.porphyriafoundation.com/about-porphyria/types-of-porphyria/AIP ...Read more

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I just found out I have a genetic disorder called porphyria (acute intermittent). Am i still able to lose weight?

I just found out I have a genetic disorder called porphyria (acute intermittent). Am i still able to lose weight?

Yes, but carefully: Acute intermittent porpyria, or aip for short, is caused by low levels of the hmbs enzyme. Symptoms include episodes of severe abdominal pain, seizures, muscle weakness, and confusion. Aip is very rare: to lose weight, you should see an expert. Attacks can be brought on by certain drugs, alcohol, stress, infections, and not eating enough. Here is a good link - http://www.Porphyriafoundation.Com/. ...Read more