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Doctor insights on: Can You Get Breast Cancer After Mastectomy

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Could you get breast cancer after a mastectomy?

Could you get breast cancer after a mastectomy?

Yes: There could be residual malignant breast tissue in the chest wall (local recurrence) or the cancer could have already spread to other organs before surgery (metastasis). ...Read more

Dr. Barry Rosen
4,344 Doctors shared insights

Cancer (Definition)

Cancer is a group of diseases that is characterized by uncontrolled cell growth leading to invasion of surrounding tissues that spread to other parts of the body. Cancer can begin anywhere in the body and is usually related to one or more genetic mutations that allow normal cells to become malignant by interfering with internal cellular control mechanisms, such as programmed cell death or by preventing ...Read more


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Is it possible to get breast cancer after a mastectomy?

Is it possible to get breast cancer after a mastectomy?

Yes: During a mastectomy, the surgeon attempts to remove as much breast tissue as possible but no surgeon can remove every last bit of breast tissue. Your residual skin/surrounding tissue still has to remain viable.

So even with a double mastectomy (removal of both breasts) there is still a very small chance of developing breast cancer at a later time. ...Read more

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Could I get a double mastectomy without having breast cancer?

Could I get a double mastectomy without having breast cancer?

Yes: If someone has a high risk inherited mutation or other circumstances that increase significantly the risk for breast cancer, that person can be considered for a preventative mastectomy. ...Read more

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Is it possible to get a mastectomy, even if you don't have breast cancer, nor are at risk of it? If so, what is the usual cost? Thank you.

Is it possible to get a mastectomy, even if you don't have breast cancer, nor are at risk of it? If so, what is the usual cost? Thank you.

Usually not!: There are specific indications for any surgical procedure including a mastectomy. If your condition doesn't fit those indications, surgeons will not do mastectomy. If you have a reason that you feel you need to have a mastectomy, you need to be evaluated by a surgeon to review your condition and to see if there are valid indications for the procedure. ...Read more

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I have breast cancer in the family and high risk. Offered double mastectomy, should I get it?

I have breast cancer in the family and high risk. Offered double mastectomy, should I get it?

Good question: But not enough info to say. If you had proper counseling and your risk is very high (eg. Brca mutation or other significant risk factors) mastectomies are an option but some patients can do ok with increased surveillance (mris) plus preventative tamoxifen or even removal of the ovaries. There are too many unknowns for me to answer properly. Make sure you see someone with expertise in this area. ...Read more

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I am about to get tested for the breast cancer gene. If positive should I get a mastectomy?

I am about to get tested for the breast cancer gene. If positive should I get a mastectomy?

That is not a: Decision that should be made by an on-line doctor who does not know you or your personal history. That is a very individual decision that should be made carefully with full information about risks with and without surgery. ...Read more

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My mums had 2 separate breast cancers 1 a lumpectomy the other was a full mastectomy my cousin also died of breast cancer shud I get checked out?

My mums had 2 separate breast cancers 1 a lumpectomy the other was a full mastectomy my cousin also died of breast cancer shud I get checked out?

Yes: Guidelines for screening mammograms in standard risk women (without a strong family history of breast cancer) recommend that mammograms begin between age 40 and 50 depending on the woman's preference. Screening starts earlier in higher risk situation such as with a family history. In this situation, I would not recommend waiting until age 50. Family Medicine, Women's Health, or OB/GYN can help ...Read more

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Is there a chance of getting cancer in the tissue of the breast reconstruction? I am considering getting breast reconstruction after having a mastectomy. I am nervous about whether I could get breast cancer again. Is the tissue where incisions and cuts we

Is there a chance of getting cancer in the tissue of the breast reconstruction? I am considering getting breast reconstruction after having a mastectomy. I am nervous about whether I could get breast cancer again. Is the tissue where incisions and cuts we

Breast Cancer: Breast cancer will not develop in tissue that is used to perform breast reconstruction. Bc develops in tissue left behind or near the site of tumor removal. If there is concern about the ability to check for cancer recurrence such as when a tumor is close to the chest wall then I suggest the case be reviewed by the tumor board so that a clear plan for surveillance is understood before a recon! ...Read more

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Mother had breast cancer in mid fifties now I'm worried i'll get it. Nobody else in family had it. Should I get prophylactic mastectomy?

Mother had breast cancer in mid fifties now I'm worried i'll get it. Nobody else in family had it. Should I get prophylactic mastectomy?

No....: Your chance of getting breast cancer, with a positive maternal history, is still only about 15%. (50% higher than a negative history.) however, if a brca test was positive, your odds would jump to about 85-86%. I would suggest a brca test if you really want to consider preemptive surgery. Speak to your primary physician and see what can be done. Good luck. ...Read more

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23andme shows I have a gene that increase breast cancer risk by 1.2. My mom has the same variant and got breast cancer at 53.I plan to get a prophylactic mastectomy because of this. Do I see a surgeon?

23andme shows I have a gene that increase breast cancer risk by 1.2. My mom has the same variant and got breast cancer at 53.I plan to get a prophylactic mastectomy because of this. Do I see a surgeon?

Yes: You should see a surgeon who specializes in breast cancer. H/s should be board certified by the Am. Board of Surgery. They will have a relationship with a Plastic Surgeon they will send you to. Do reasearch. The surgeon should discuss both expander/implant as well as autologous options (most will skip over autologous) and be board certified by the Am. Board of Plastic Surg. Www. Abplsurg. Org ...Read more

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Can I survive breast cancer without a mastectomy?

Can I survive breast cancer without a mastectomy?

That is very: Dependent on issues like the stage ; type of cancer you have. This is a very individual medical issue which can't be answered on line. You will need to discuss this with your physician. ...Read more

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What is the risk of breast cancer when grandmother had mastectomy?

What is the risk of breast cancer when grandmother had mastectomy?

Average: If your grandmother is the only family member with breast ca, your risk should be about the same as the average women who is your age, with the same menstrual, pregnancy history, etc. First order relatives (mother daughter, sister) increase your risk and multiple second order relatives may increase risk. As well. ...Read more

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Do you always need a mastectomy when you're diagnosed with breast cancer?

Do you always need a mastectomy when you're diagnosed with breast cancer?

No, Lumpectomy option: For early-stage breast cancer nowadays breast conservation is a very reasonable option. It typically involves wide local excision of the breast cancer, called the lumpectomy, sampling of the lymph nodes and radiation treatments to sterilize the rest of the unremoved breasts. Chemotherapy or hormonal therapy may be needed depending on the stage of the disease. ...Read more

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Can you tell me about getting breast cancer what age should you consider having a prohpylactic mastectomy?

Can you tell me about getting breast cancer what age should you consider having a prohpylactic mastectomy?

Good question but: ...I can't because I do not know your personal risk factors or family history. Prophylactic surgery is not something you ask for in the same way you would ask for fries with your bigmac. The decision to do it and its timing is determined after a good risk assessment, looking at all the factors involved. Talk to your gyn about a risk assessment visit if you are very concerned. Best 2u. ...Read more

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How can they check for breast cancer after a mastectomy?

How can they check for breast cancer after a mastectomy?

Physical Exam: After a mastectomy, frequent exams of the affected side, mammograms on the opposite side. Yearly chest xray, and other tests depending on symptoms. ...Read more

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How effective is a radical mastectomy for treating breast cancer?

How effective is a radical mastectomy for treating breast cancer?

Mastectomy: Mastectomy is generally very effective, however chemotherapy and radiation are sometimes recommended as well. It really depends on the type of cancer, how aggressive it is, and wether there has been spread to other areas or lymph nodes. In early stages mastectomy can cure 95-98% of women. Your breast surgeon/oncologist can/should provide specifics based on your case. ...Read more

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My sister is diagonosed with stage 2 breast cancer and went through mastectomy, what are the chances of survival?

Good: Stage-2 breast cancer generally has good prognosis. I would put her into 70%-80% chance of cure if she is given the current standard treatment. For breast cancer. ...Read more

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My tumour marker with 1mm breast cancer invasion was 9.3. After mastectomy it is still 9.3. Does that mean it wasn't actually cancer?

No: Breast cancer is diagnosed with a microscope, not a blood test. Your tumor marker being normal before and after surgery tells me nothing at all. People may have cancer and their marker can be normal or have an elevated marker without having cancer. Best of luck to you. ...Read more

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Breast cancer - mastectomy and treatment after, what is the process like?

Breast cancer - mastectomy and treatment after, what is the process like?

Medications, Radiat: Sometimes after surgery doctors may prefer radiation treatment or medications like tamoxifen ...Read more

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Is mastectomy really necessary for a stage 2 breast cancer patient?

Is mastectomy really necessary for a stage 2 breast cancer patient?

Depends: The choice between mastectomy (either one or both breasts) and lumpectomy depends on many factors including genetic issues, size of the cancer and of the breast, location, and many others. It is a choice to be made by both the surgeon and the patient after a thorough discussion. ...Read more

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How do doctors check for breast cancer after a mastectomy?

How do doctors check for breast cancer after a mastectomy?

General check ups: An oncologist is a cancer specialist who will examine the pateints and look for any local signs of recurrence in the breast (in case the breast was not removed with mastectomy) and also examine the chest area and the opposite breast. There are also blood tests, chest x-ray and ct scans to look for internal spread of cancer in the abdomen. ...Read more

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Can you tell me about breast cancer survivors with mastectomy?

There are some: Great stories about breast cancer survivors in this article:
http://www. Womenshealthmag. Com/health/breast-cancer-survivors
*** if this is the type of information you desired then please clarify and re-ask. ...Read more

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Does stage 1 breast cancer need an immediate chemotherapy after total mastectomy?

Well. The treatment: Plan depends on a number of factors that would need to be discussed with the breast surgeon, radiation oncologist etc. Was a total mastectomy recommended for a stage 1 breast cancer? ...Read more

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Do you have to be at least 18 to have a mastectomy if it isn't for breast cancer or tumor reasons, simply cosmetic?

Do you have to be at least 18 to have a mastectomy if it isn't for breast cancer or tumor reasons, simply cosmetic?

No: It is hard to imagine why a mastectomy would be recommended for cosmetic reasons, but breast reductions can be done in adolescence, with parental consent. ...Read more

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Is it necesary that a mastectomy or quadrantectomy be required after complete pathological response to breast cancer?

Is it necesary that a mastectomy or quadrantectomy be required after complete pathological response to breast cancer?

Yes and depends: We have never been able to prove that leaving breast cancer in place after chemo or hormone treatment alone with complete path response is safe. We could shrink to perform breast conserving surgery but at times mastectomy may be indicated. We look forward to a trial that is looking at radiation vs not in complete responders who present with more advanced breast cancer. ...Read more

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Found out there is also a risk of breast cancer in my family. Could a mastectomy be considered preventive medicine in my case?

Found out there is also a risk of breast cancer in my family. Could a mastectomy be considered preventive medicine in my case?

Not necessarily: You need to have a discussion with your doctor about all the details and may get a genetic test. Even after that it is not an easy call, but it is not an issue for this forum. ...Read more

Dr. Barry Rosen
1,378 Doctors shared insights

Breast Cancer (Definition)

Occurs when glandular cells lining the milk ducts and lobules of the human breast begin to grow in an unregulated manner. Often curable if found early and treated effectively with surgery, hormonal therapy, chemotherapy and targeted therapy, or a combination thereof. Early detection before the malignancy becomes large enough to be felt depends on mammography/sonography and MRI imaging of the breast ...Read more


Dr. Mark Hoepfner
1,061 Doctors shared insights

Breast Carcinoma (Definition)

Most breast cancers are carcinomas. This is a type of breast cancer. These cancers start in the cells that line organs and tissues. In fact, breast cancers are often a type of carcinoma called adenocarcinoma, which starts in cells that make glands (glandular tissue). Breast adenocarcinomas start in the ducts (the milk ducts) or ...Read more