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Doctor insights on: Can Pregnancy Contribute To Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

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Can pregnancy contribute to thoracic outlet syndrome?

Can pregnancy contribute to thoracic outlet syndrome?

Don't think so: Pregnancy doesn't cause this condition but your symptoms could worsen during pregnancy. ...Read more

Dr. Shari Jackson
4 Doctors shared insights

Pregnancy (Definition)

When your due date arrives, you will be more than ready to have your baby! Most women deliver the baby somewhere between 37 and 42 weeks. According to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, only 5% of babies arrive on the exact due date. Approximately 7% of babies are not delivered by 42 weeks, and when that happens, it is referred to ...Read more


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How common is thoracic outlet syndrome?

How common is thoracic outlet syndrome?

Not very common: Three manisfestations:

1. Pinching of the artery leading to the arm and hand (most common)
2. Pinching of the vein leading to the arm and hand, resulting in swelling (next common)
3. Pinching of the nerve resulting in various types of pain (not very common). ...Read more

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What are the symptoms of recurrent thoracic outlet syndrome?

What are the symptoms of recurrent thoracic outlet syndrome?

Radiating symptoms: Usually patient presents with numbness tingling and parathesias in the effected arm. Usually exacerbated when lifting arm above the head. Seek care for evaluation ...Read more

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Could thoracic outlet syndrome be covered under workmans comp?

You bet!: Many tos cases occur associated with on the job injuries. I have seen problems after motor vehicle accidents, lifting issues, repetitive overhead activities, and a variety of traumatic impacts. However, inclusion rules for worker's comp varies from state to state. Check locally with the state offices. ...Read more

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What causes recurrent thoracic outlet syndrome and is it common?

What causes recurrent thoracic outlet syndrome and is it common?

Extra rib or injury: It is caused by pressure on the nerves veins and possibly arteries of the arm where the first rib and clavicle meet ...Read more

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What is the definition or description of: Thoracic outlet syndrome?

What is the definition or description of: Thoracic outlet syndrome?

Compression: A condition were the first rib or an extra rib causes compression between the clavicle and the rib of any one of the following three subclavian artery, subclavian vein, or brachioplexus ...Read more

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How major is surgery for thoracic outlet syndrome?

How major is surgery for thoracic outlet syndrome?

Yes: I think any surgery is major and when it comes to thoracic outlet syndrome, surgery is not common and is typically last resort as they try physical therapy and other modalities first, but there are many causes of thoracic outlet syndrome so it depends on what is obstructing that needs to be moved or repaired or removed. Ask your vascular surgeon for specifics on your case. ...Read more

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Is surgery for thoracic outlet syndrome unreliable?

TOS: TOS is combinations of many problems in a complex anatomic location. There are so simple diagnostics or solutions. If properly diagnosed, AND non surgical therapies like PT fail to improve the symptoms, then surgery with an experienced TOS surgeon can be both therapeutic and reliable. Take friend with you to appointments and therapy. Be well. ...Read more

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Is thoracic outlet syndrome surgery a major surgery?

Is thoracic outlet syndrome surgery a major surgery?

Yes: This is a relatively rare operation that should be done by someone with experience. Results are best when the compression is of an artery or vein, less good for nerve compression. Complications include failure of surgery, damage to nerves and blood vessels to arm, nerve to diaphragm or shoulder muscles and "pneumothorax" (air in the chest). Helpful for the right indications, EXPERIENCE IS KEY ...Read more

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What is the prognosis of thoracic outlet syndrome surgery?

What is the prognosis of thoracic outlet syndrome surgery?

Good but: Usually surgery is the last thing you want to do for thoracic outlet syndrome because it is simple surgery but it could end up with an open chest and tubes in the chest and the recovery take a long time but the result are usually good if you need one get a second opinion and get done by a thoracic surgeon good luck ...Read more

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Is surgery effective for thoracic outlet syndrome?

Is surgery effective for thoracic outlet syndrome?

Maybe: Before surgery, one should do everything they can to reconstitute the muscle and skeletal systems of the shoulder. My clinical findings implicate weakened muscles that hold up the shoulder and keep the collar bone from collapsing toward the first rib; thereby constricting the space between these two bones. Trapezius muscle strength is of utmost concern, and a good physical therapist can help. ...Read more

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Is there a reoperation for thoracic outlet syndrome? Does it work?

Is there a reoperation for thoracic outlet syndrome? Does it work?

Varies: It really comes down to your specific diagnosis. If you have had a TOS surgery and are still having problems then the big question is...why? It may be you have another completely different condition in addition to TOS and in that case more TOS surgery would not help. If something was not done right or something has recurred, then TOS surgery may help. ...Read more

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Is there a reoperation for neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome?

Is there a reoperation for neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome?

Yes.: There are specialists who perform 1st rib resections. It will help quite a bit and alleviate most if not all of your symptoms. ...Read more

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What does this mean: cervical rib and thoracic outlet syndrome?

What does this mean: cervical rib and thoracic outlet syndrome?

Nerves are pinched: Thoracic outlet is the result of the big nerves and blood vessels in the neck and chest being pinched by the muscles and bones at the top of the rib cage as they exit towards the arms. A cervical rib is just one cause of this problem. It can be treated with physical therapy or surgery. ...Read more

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What kind of doctor should you see for thoracic outlet syndrome?

Physiatrist: A vascular surgeon can find & operate. The operation is notoriously ineffective in many, but not all. A physiatrist can also diagnose. Unfortuntely, many neurologists disbelieve tos because their studies cannot detect. An experienced physical therapist is best clinician to lead way to improvement & without surgery. See my discussion on chronic pain board at quora. Com. ...Read more

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Can Thoracic Outlet Syndrome affect breathing or the Phrenic Nerve?

Can Thoracic Outlet Syndrome affect breathing or the Phrenic Nerve?

TOS: Thoracic Outlet Syndrome involves the nerves traveling through the shoulder at the level of the 1st rib. The phrenic nerve does not typically travel through the outlet and is usually on the anterior scalene muscle that forms the anterior border of the outlet. Occasionally an accessory phrenic nerve may be dominant and travel through the outlet but I have not seen any cases with breathing problems. ...Read more

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What is the link between a? Cervical rib and thoracic outlet syndrome?

What is the link between a? Cervical rib and thoracic outlet syndrome?

Varies: Many people remain asymptomatic with a cervical rib. The most severe complication is thoracic outlet syndrome caused by compression of the brachial plexus (weakness in affected arm) and/or subclavian artery (decreased pulses in affected arm). ...Read more

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Can thoracic outlet syndrome cause severe chronic pain at the t6 region.?

Can thoracic outlet syndrome cause severe chronic pain at the t6 region.?

Unlikely: Thoracic outlet affects lateral neck, shoulder blade, lateral upper chest, and radiates down the arm typically to digits 4 and 5 of the hand, if the neurogenic variety. A more distal variation seems focalized to the lateral chest and armpit, (pectoralis minor). T-6 is too low for tos. Severe pain there is more likely of discogenic origin, if within the spine, or referred pain from internal organs. ...Read more

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Are vascular conditions a common complication of thoracic outlet syndrome?

Are vascular conditions a common complication of thoracic outlet syndrome?

Yes: The thoracic outlet is notable for the presence of arteries, veins, and nerves. This outlet may be compressed to various degrees by various means (position, abnormal anatomy, tumor), impairing arterial blood supply to, or veinous drainage of, the arm. Also, there may be supply/drain complications to the brain. Symptoms include pain, swelling, numbness of the arm, and potentially lightheadedness. ...Read more

Dr. Bennett Machanic
315 Doctors shared insights

Thoracic Outlet Syndrome (Definition)

A condition where the first rib or an extra rib causes compression between the clavicle and the rib of any one of the following three subclavian artery, ...Read more