Top
30
Doctor insights on: Can People With Hemochromatosis Donate Blood

Share
1

1
I have hemochromatosis — can I donate blood?

I have hemochromatosis — can I donate blood?

No: Unfortunately, the red cross does not allow this blood to be donated even though there is nothing wrong with the blood. However, certain bacteria thrive on iron and that may be the red cross's rational. ...Read more

Dr. Donald Alves
355 doctors shared insights

Blood Donation (Definition)

Blood donation is the act of giving ones blood to a blood bank, so that it may be used in the future to help someone else. People with transmissible viral diseases, such as HIV or hepatitis C, are not able to donate blood, as ...Read more


2

2
Can someone with genetic hemochromatosis donate blood?

Can someone with genetic hemochromatosis donate blood?

Yes: If you're not symptomatic, there's no reason even to tell them, and in fact it's a great way to keep your body iron burden down. In fact, it's how I manage my one-dose hemochromatosis while helping others. ...Read more

3

3
Every time my son donates blood they tell him his iron is too high. This time it was 51. My uncle has hemochromatosis, should I be concerned.

Every time my son donates blood they tell him his iron is too high. This time it was 51.  My uncle has hemochromatosis, should I be concerned.

Hemochromatosis: Commonest is classical hemochromatosis which is AR it takes 2 genes for full desease
but you can get a low peneterence of the desease so further evaluation of ferritin and transferrin should be done by your heamatologist ...Read more

4

4
Is there a blood test you can take for hemochromatosis?

Is there a blood test you can take for hemochromatosis?

Yes: A good screen for common hemochromatosis is the transferrin saturation, the ratio of iron to iron binding capacity in the blood. Liver enzymes will also be drawn. More than 50% in a woman or 60% in a man is suggestive; follow-up may include serum ferritin, a more costly blood test which is much elevated confirms the diagnosis. ...Read more

5

5
Hemochromatosis! I'm getting a blood test! Can you tell me about it?

Hemochromatosis! I'm getting a blood test! Can you tell me about it?

Easy to treat: Of all the common, deadly diseases, it is by far the easiest to manage. It is genetic. You absorb iron too well. It will ruin your liver, heart and joints if not removed by blood donation. ...Read more

6

6
I have hemochromatosis and had my first phlebotomy yesterday. I was to get 300cc out. My blood was so thick it took 1.5hrs to get 200. Why is my blood like that and the risks?

Iron overload: This disease, if advanced, causes increased red blood cells, increased iron, and "thick blood". You may not be well hydrated. Are you on an aspirin? You need to see a hematologist or a GI doctor who deals with this illness & have a good treatment area with experienced phlebotomists. Drink lots of water the day of and be patient. You may have to go every 1-2 weeks for a while & follow closely. ...Read more

7

7
Is the blood dark in hemochromatosis?

No: The color is normal. Brown blood usually means methemoglobin. ...Read more

9

9
What to do if I have hemochromatosis have to give blood. Can you get medical retirement on this or not. Just asking than?

What to do if I have hemochromatosis have to give blood. Can you get medical retirement on this or not. Just asking than?

Not a disability: Of all the common diseases that will kill a person horribly if they are missed or neglected, hemochromatosis is the easiest to manage. Dropping off a unit or two of blood each week -- whether it's available for transfusion or not -- until you're at a good iron level, then being followed and having blood drawn as required, will keep you healthy. I hope this isn't a disappointment. Best wishes. ...Read more

10

10
Is there any blood test that you could take to test for hemochromatosis?

Is there any blood test that you could take to test for hemochromatosis?

Yes: Serum iron — is best conducted after fasting for at least 3 hours. Stop iron or vitamin c at least 3 days before taking the test. Total iron binding capacity — tells how well ur body can bind 2 iron. Serum iron divided by TIBC x 100% gives you important information about the transferrin-iron saturation percentage (ts%). Ts% is usually 25-35%; serum ferritin measures the amount of iron stored in u. ...Read more

11

11
I have hemochromatosis. If I am getting weekly plebotomies will it affect an LFT test? wouldn't losing blood lower your serum bilirubin?

I have hemochromatosis. If I am getting weekly plebotomies will it affect an LFT test? wouldn't losing blood lower your serum bilirubin?

No: Your serum bilirubin is presumably in the normal range, and there's no point trying to figure out why it's a bit up one day and down the next. The decrease in red cells recycled is negligible because you're actually making more of them as replacements. Your SGOT/AST and SGPT/ALT will return to normal if they are up as you recover from this illness. Be glad -- this is the easiest killer to manage. ...Read more

12

12
Can u have hemochromatosis if your blood tests show high iron and tsat levels in 2 out of 4 tests over 3 years — t'ferrin & ferritin levels are normal?

Can u have hemochromatosis if your blood tests show high iron and tsat levels in 2 out of 4 tests over 3 years — t'ferrin & ferritin levels are normal?

Proper testing: The transferrin saturation needs to be done on fasting blood samples. A cut-off of 45% is best used. If the ts > 45% on fasting specimens, although the ferritin might be normal, can be seen with some iron overload disorders including hemochromatosis. A normal fasting ferritin and tsast. ...Read more

13

13
Iron blood panel showed this: UIBC- 109 (low), Iron serum- 170 (high), Iron Saturation 63% (high). Is this hemochromatosis?

Iron blood panel showed this: UIBC- 109 (low), Iron serum- 170 (high), Iron Saturation 63% (high). Is this hemochromatosis?

Suspicious: Further, testing is necessary to definitively diagnose hemochromatosis. The elevated transferrin level makes it much more likely but the test should be repeated and you should have genetic testing for the C282Y gene. I suggest you see a hematologist or general internist for definitive testing. Thanks for trusting HealthTap! ...Read more

15

15
Hemochromatosis — do I have to be a gene carrier to have symptoms? My gastro is just ck for gene not actual blood levels. Seems he may be skip a step?

Gene's not the key: If you're shown to be iron-overloaded, the key is "get the iron out of you." it's fun and good to go looking for the gene, and it'll be helpful for when other family members need to be worked up, but it's not going to make or break the diagnosis. There are a couple of common alleles at the main locus, some uncommon alleles and some other loci -- all part of a thorough workup. ...Read more

16

16
My father has a diagnosis of hemochromatosis. My blood lab results seem ambivalent to me. Insight would be appreciated. I have blood tests with me?

My father has a diagnosis of hemochromatosis. My blood lab results seem ambivalent to me. Insight would be appreciated. I have blood tests with me?

Hemochromatosis: The most important thing to know is that all of your first degree relatives need to be examined and have lab tests and genetic testing for hemochromatosis. In some cases imaging may need to be performed. See this link for more info:http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/hemochromatosis/diagnosis-treatment/diagnosis/dxc-20167322 ...Read more

17

17
Iron studies panel was abnormal indicating Hemochromatosis. Doc sent me for genetic blood test to confirm. If this is positive, what is the treatment?

Iron studies panel was abnormal indicating Hemochromatosis. Doc sent me for genetic blood test to confirm. If this is positive, what is the treatment?

Blood letting: The treatment is relatively simple. Periodically, some of your blood is drained out to remove iron along with your red cells. Done regularly it would prevent excess iron accumulation and the usual damage excess iron causes. ...Read more

19

19
I can't find anyone in Northern Calif that will accept my blood since I have hemochromotosis. Do you know of any that will in N Calif? Thanks!

Blood donor: Its bad science (I think it's a misinformed policy), but donor centers won't accept a donation from someone with hemochromatosis even under excellent control. I deeply appreciate your desire to donate blood as a philanthropic act. I wouldn't criticize you if you forgot, but talk with your personal physciain and perhaps the blood bank medical director. ...Read more

21

21
Why do people develop hemochromatosis?

Why do people develop hemochromatosis?

It's in the genes: In hereditary (= inherited from parents) hemochromatosis, too much iron is absorbed by the gut & deposits in tissues. Liver, heart, other damage can result. It is autosomal recessive: both parents must carry the gene & not all offspring will be affected. Secondary (= due to other causes) hemochromatosis can occur with certain types of hemolytic anemia (red blood cells bursting, releasing iron). ...Read more

22

22
What do you suggest if my friend has a hemochromatosis?

Blood letting: Hemochromatosis can be easily managed by periodic removal of blood to drain the body of excess iron. This is about the only disease where the old practice of blood-letting actually works. ...Read more

23

23
Which is the impact of hemochromatosis on the individual, family and society?

Homework question: An individual with hemochromatosis dies in middle age unless diagnosed and treated. Treatment is extremely easy compared with the other common killers and leads to a healthy life. Sufferers are often accused of being alcoholics in denial if their physicians are unaware of hemochromatosis. I hope you can flesh this out for class. Noncompliance and ignorance kill. ...Read more

24

24
What is iron overload, hemochromatosis?

Too much bodily iron: As a result of the inability to increase iron loss, iron overload is an inevitable response to increased iron entry into the body. This can occur by one of three mechanisms — nutritional intake, increased absorption, parenteral sources (i.e. Transfusions). Hemochromatosis is abnormally high absorption of iron as result of a genetic defect. Extra iron can be toxic. ...Read more

25

25
How exactly do you test for hemochromatosis?

How exactly do you test for hemochromatosis?

Varous blood work: Helpful., such as serum transferrin, transferin saturation, liver enzyme testing, ferritin level. Other options include, liver biopsy and imaging. ...Read more

26

26
How common is iron overload/hemochromatosis?

How common is iron overload/hemochromatosis?

1 in 200: It's extremely common, and of all the common, serious diseases, it is the easiest to manage. If it's discovered relatively late, the person realizes they've had "the blahs" for years once phlebotomy removes the excess iron. ...Read more

27

27
How serious is iron overload, hemochromatosis?

Can be deadly: Over time, excesses of iron build up in major organs such as the heart, liver, pancreas, joints and pituitary. If the extra iron is not removed, these organs can become diseased, causing conditions like diabetes mellitus, irregular heart beat or heart attack, arthritis, cirrhosis of the liver or liver cancer, gall bladder disease, depression, impotence, infertility, hypothyroidism, hypogonadism. ...Read more

28

28
How true it is that hemochromatosis is genetic?

How true it is that hemochromatosis is genetic?

Partly true: The disorder is called hereditary hemochromatosis and it is an autosomal recessive disorder. Meaning it is passed from parent to offspring, people can be carriers of the gene, and you have to have 2 copies of the gene to have the disorder: one from the father and one from the mother. Hemochromatosis is an iron overload which can have other causes than hereditary hemochromatosis though. ...Read more

29

29
Who is affected by iron overload/hemochromatosis?

Mostly men: Women usually because of their menstrual cycle , they can. Loose excessive iron. ...Read more

30

30
What's the pathological physiology of hemochromatosis?

What's the pathological physiology of hemochromatosis?

Iron: 400 characters aren't enough; there are websites, books and journal articles. These folks absorb iron too easily through the gut, and it ends up in the liver, heart, and endocrine pancreas where the atoms generate free radicals that do damage. ...Read more

Dr. (Liz)Phuong Tran
320 doctors shared insights

Hemochromatosis (Definition)

A medical condition caused by iron accumulation in the body. It can be the result of underlying hereditary disease or be due ...Read more