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Doctor insights on: Can A Ct Scan Pick Up An Acoustic Neuroma

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Dr. Neil Giddings Dr. Giddings
ENT - Head & Neck Surgery
35 years in practice
University of Toledo College of Medicine
1

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Can a CT scan pick up an acoustic neuroma?

Can a CT scan pick up an acoustic neuroma?

Not usually: Ct scans use x-rays and are better for imaging bones than soft tissue. A large acoustic neuroma may be seen on ct scan, but MRI with a contrast medium is able to detect small acoustic neuromas that may only be several millimeters in size. Mri uses a magnet for imaging which also has the benefit of no x-ray exposure.

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Dr. Eric Weisman
1 Doctor shared a insight

Computed Tomography (Definition)

Ct uses xrays taken an 360 degrees combined with a computer to see"inside" the body. The table moves as the xray tube and detectors spin around the patient 10 times a second or more! The image shows excellent soft tissue detail, enhanced with injection of intravenous contrast or oral contrast. This way the body is shown in slices, in any plane, usually axially, but ...Read more


Dr. Neil Giddings Dr. Giddings
ENT - Head & Neck Surgery
35 years in practice
University of Toledo College of Medicine
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Can you tell me about acoustic neuroma?

Can you tell me about acoustic neuroma?

Benign tumor: Acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that usually originates from the vestibular (balance) nerve. Treatment options include observation, surgery, or radiation depending on the symptoms, age of the patient, and growth of the lesion. See a neurotologist for full evaluation or a neurosurgeon that deals with these lesions on a regular basis.

Dr. Neil Giddings Dr. Giddings
ENT - Head & Neck Surgery
35 years in practice
University of Toledo College of Medicine
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Can you tell me about an acoustic neuroma?

Can you tell me about an acoustic neuroma?

Benign tumor: Acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that usually originates from the vestibular (balance) nerve. Treatment options include observation, surgery, or radiation depending on the symptoms, age of the patient, and growth of the lesion. See a neurotologist for full evaluation or a neurosurgeon that deals with these lesions on a regular basis.

Dr. Visalakshi Vallury Dr. Vallury
Family Medicine
20 years in practice
University of Illinois College of Medicine
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Acoustic Neuroma regrowth. I had a 3.5cm Acoustic Neuroma removed 3 years ago by Translab. Wondering what chances of regrowth are.

Acoustic Neuroma regrowth. I had a 3.5cm Acoustic Neuroma removed 3 years ago by Translab. Wondering what chances of regrowth are.

Low: Unilateral sporadic acoustic neuromas have a very low recurrence rate after removal. Studies show it is about 0.2%.

Rishi Kumar Dr. Kumar
Anesthesiology
68 years in practice
Baylor College of Medicine
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How do doctors diagnose acoustic neuroma?

Function/Imaging: Modalities can typically be divided into two categories: 1.) imaging - ct or MRI (with contrast) can be used to visualize tumors in detail. 2.) functional tests - audiometry and brainstem auditory evoked responses assess the integrity of the vestibulocochlear cranial nerve by analyzing how the brain responses to test sounds.

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Dr. Geoffrey Rutledge Dr. Rutledge
Internal Medicine
37 years in practice
McGill University Faculty of Medicine
7
Dr. Neil Giddings Dr. Giddings
ENT - Head & Neck Surgery
35 years in practice
University of Toledo College of Medicine
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Could an acoustic neuroma explain my severe headaches and neck pain?

Could an acoustic neuroma explain my severe headaches and neck pain?

Rarely: Acoustic neuromas would very infrequently cause neck pain and would only cause headache if very large. Acoustic neuromas usually present with ringing ing in one ear and hearing loss in one ear.

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Dr. Anne Phelan-adams Dr. Phelan-adams
Family Medicine
years in practice
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I have unilateral tinnitus from about 4 months, feel a little unsteady sometimes. No hearing loss. Worried abt Acoustic neuroma, is it common?

I have unilateral tinnitus from about 4 months, feel a little unsteady sometimes. No hearing loss. Worried abt Acoustic neuroma, is it common?

No, but.....: Acoustic neuroma isn't common but it happens and it is serious. Your symptoms are worrisome. In any case you need to see a doctor about your symptoms. You can start with a primary care physician who will refer you to the appropriate specialist for further evaluation. Please don't procrastinate!

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Dr. Bennett Machanic Dr. Machanic
Neurology
48 years in practice
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
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My Recent MRI showed a 10mm ovoid cyst in the left basal ganglia - should I be concerned? I also have a 4mm acoustic neuroma on the right side.

Careful followup: You have two areas uncovered. The acoustic neuroma is the bigger issue, and needs to be carefully monitored and watched. If it gets bigger, it will require excision. Unclear why you have the cyst, but could represent a remote issue of no current consequence, but this too should be followed. Best to see an experienced neurosurgeon and set up plan of action.

Dr. David Astrachan Dr. Astrachan
ENT - Head & Neck Surgery
33 years in practice
Yale University School of Medicine
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Do people die from an acoustic neuroma?

Do people die from an acoustic neuroma?

Rarely: Acoustic neuromas are slow growing benign tumors that rarely get to a size that can cause death. They are not cancers.

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Dr. Geoffrey Rutledge Dr. Rutledge
Internal Medicine
37 years in practice
McGill University Faculty of Medicine
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What are some of the tests for Acoustic neuroma?

The tests for Acoustic neuroma include:: CT of head, MRI of head with contrast, Hearing test, Auditory brainstem response test.

Dr. Jed Kwartler Dr. Kwartler
ENT - Head & Neck Surgery
34 years in practice
George Washington University Medical School
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What cause balance problem except acoustic neuroma?

Dizziness: There is a long list of ear related issues that cause balance problems, neurologic, cardiovascular, circulatory, metabolic/hormonal problems also can cause dizziness/lightheadedness/balance issues. Acoustic neuroma is a rare condition so lots of other things to check and consider first.

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Dr. James Goodrich Dr. Goodrich
Neurosurgery
37 years in practice
Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons
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What is the definition or description of: acoustic neuroma?

Acoustic neuroma: This is a tumor that arises from the nerve that controls balance and hearing, the viiith cranial nerve. Typically benign and depending on size and symptoms should be considered for surgical resection.

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Dr. Neil Giddings Dr. Giddings
ENT - Head & Neck Surgery
35 years in practice
University of Toledo College of Medicine
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I've developed acoustic neuroma. What should I be watching out for in the future?

Several things: As acoustic neuromas grow they typically cause hearing loss and tinnitus. They may also produce balance problems. If they get very large they may cause facial nerve paralysis or hydrocephalus which is too much fluid pressure in your head. Fortunately, if it is closely monitored, most of the more serious complications may be avoided by surgical removal or radiation treatment.

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Dr. David Astrachan Dr. Astrachan
ENT - Head & Neck Surgery
33 years in practice
Yale University School of Medicine
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Can a mastoid tumor turn into an acoustic neuroma?

Can a mastoid tumor turn into an acoustic neuroma?

No: Completely different issues. An acoustic neuroma is a benign growth of the hearing/balance nerve. The mastoid is an air containing space connected to the middle ear.

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Dr. Kevin Teal Dr. Teal
Neurosurgery
26 years in practice
University of Texas Southwestern Medical School at Dallas
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Are there treatment guidelines for acoustic neuroma?

Yes: Acoustic neuroma is usually managed by otolaryngology and neurosurgery. Small tumors less than 1 cm are usually followed with serial head mris. These tumors can be treated with radiosurgery or open surgery if they are growing or large and causing pressure on local structures. The loss of hearing means the surgical options expand somewhat. The main goal of treatment is to preserve facial function.

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Dr. Edward Smith Dr. Smith
Neurology
50 years in practice
University of Illinois College of Medicine
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What should I do for my acoustic neuroma post surgery?

Talk to your doctor: Talk to the surgeon that removed your tumor. He or she will be most familiar with you and the pathology of your case.

Dr. David Astrachan Dr. Astrachan
ENT - Head & Neck Surgery
33 years in practice
Yale University School of Medicine
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Does an MRI with contrast always detect acoustic neuroma?

99% plus: An MRI with contrast of the internal auditory canals will pick up 99% of acoustic neuromas. Not perfect, but very close. Tiny acoustics can be missed.

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Dr. Michael Gabor
1,852 Doctors shared insights

Ct Scan (Definition)

Ct scan uses data from a beam of xrays and reconstructs a cross sectional image of your body. It is a high dose of xrays and used only when the benefits outweigh the risk. Cancer risk is 1 in 500 in children. Also using iodinated contrast might cause transient renal failure in about 5% of patients. (contrast induced nepropathy) most do not explain this to the patient as ...Read more


Dr. Neil Giddings
110 Doctors shared insights

Acoustic Neuroma (Definition)

A benign, noncancerous tumor that grows at the base of the brain. The most common symptom is hearing loss, often noticed on the telephone. Hearing tests and MRI ...Read more