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Doctor insights on: Broca's Vs Wernicke's Aphasia

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Dr. Alan Ali Dr. Ali
2 doctors agreed:
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What is Wernicke's aphasia?

Dr. Alan Ali Dr. Ali
2 doctors agreed:
What is Wernicke's aphasia?

Wernike Aphasia: Speech is fluent but often degenerates into random hard to follow "streams of consciousness, which may be peppered with non-words or made up words. The speech also fails to provide good answers to questions posed to them, suggesting that they do not understand what is said to them. Hence there is difficulty in comprehension rather than articulation, hence the term Receptive Aphasia. ...Read more

Dr. Steven Beer
84 doctors shared insights

Loss Of Speech (Definition)

Mutism = inability to speak. Aphasia = loss of ...Read more


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What is sundowning vs dementia?

What is sundowning vs dementia?

Sundowning is a: Symptom that can occur in dementia patients. It refers to misperceiving the environment or outright halliucinations whch usually occur at or after sundown, hence the name. Dementia is a degenerative illness which effects the brain and inhibits a person's ability to function. ...Read more

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What are brocas aphasia, and wernicke's aphasia?

What are brocas aphasia, and wernicke's aphasia?

Different: Broca's aphasia is difficulty in expressing speech. Werniche's aphasia is difficulty in understanding speech. That's oversimplified but still an adequate answer. ...Read more

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How do physicians diagnose bell s palsy vs stroke?

How do physicians diagnose bell s palsy vs stroke?

Scary: Yes, it can be alarming. Isolated paralysis of crania nerve 7 leading to one-sided facial paralysis is bell's palsy. Stroke rarely causes just this. There may be recent or remote history of cold sore or herpetic gingivostomatitis with bell's. ...Read more

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What is wernicke korsakoff syndrome?

What is wernicke korsakoff syndrome?

Brain damage: Wernicke's encephalopathy and korsakoff syndrome are different conditions that are both due to brain damage caused by a lack of vitamin b1 (thiamine). A lack of vitamin b1 is common in people with alcoholism. It is also common in persons whose bodies do not absorb food properly (malabsorption), such as sometimes occurs after obesity surgery. ...Read more

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What is wernicke encephalopathy like?

What is wernicke encephalopathy like?

Confabulation: Wernicke's encephalopathy is due to a vitamin deficiency and causes a typical picture of dementia, gait problems, and confabulation which means that the patient's conversation is not based in reality and that can difficult to distinguish from psychosis. ...Read more

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What is subcortical dementia?

What is subcortical dementia?

Definition: In most kinds of dementia, autopsy reveals widespread degeneration in the cerebral cortex - such as the plaques and tangles which are the hallmark of alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia are therefore sometimes classed as "cortical dementias." in other kinds of dementia, there is targeted damage to regions lying under the cortex, giving rise to sub cortical dementia. ...Read more

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What is multi-infarct dementia?

What is multi-infarct dementia?

Many small strokes: Multiple small "lacunar infarcts" can add up and create a picture very similar to alzheimers, and result in significant cognitive problems. Need to treat the dementia with meds, but also prevent further strokes with meds. Complex, so need fairly thorough evaluation and treatments. ...Read more

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What is frontotemporal dementia?

There are 3 types: Named for the brain areas that are affected, the frontal and temporal lobes, there are several different variants of this type of dementia. Some of these types of dementia have prominent problems with words - either slowly losing the ability to speak or losing the ability to makes sense when one talks. There is an impulsive, disinhibited personality variant also. ...Read more

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Is wernicke encephalopathy a disability?

Is wernicke encephalopathy a disability?

Disability?: Yes, it can become a disability if not treated quickly. However, rapid diagnosis and treatment can lead to full recovery -- supposing the person is also able to maintain healthy intake of nutrients after the crisis. (and not go on drinking alcohol, if that's what precipitated the problem to begin with). ...Read more

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Does a 13yo. Who pronounces rs as vs have apraxia of speech?

Does a 13yo. Who pronounces rs as vs have apraxia of speech?

No: He has difficulty with clarity of speech. Apraxia is a defect in initiation and appropriate completion of motor tasks. His problem can be considered as a form of mild lisp. It usually resolves with time and some speech therapy. ...Read more

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How is multi-infarct dementia found?

How is multi-infarct dementia found?

Thorough Evaluation: Tests determine whether other medical problems could be causing dementia, such as anemia, brain tumor, chronic infection, drug and medication intoxication, severe depression, thyroid disease, vitamin deficiency. Neuropsychological testing is helpful to find out what parts of thinking have been affected, and to guide other tests. Tests also can include a head ct scan and MRI of the brain. ...Read more

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What kind of condition is dementia with Lewy bodies?

What kind of condition is dementia with Lewy bodies?

Less well known: Lewy body dementia often starts with visual hallucinations and as it progresses a person develops some of movement problems seen in parkinsons disease. Memory retrieval is slowed. There is a waxing and waning of symptoms throughout the day. A person can have lbd and alzheimers at the same time. ...Read more

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What is bell s palsy symptoms from?

What is bell s palsy symptoms from?

Loss of nerve action: Bell's palsy is from dysfunction of the seventh cranial nerve which activates the muscles of the face. It usually occurs suddenly, rarely has pain, but causes the eyelids, facial side and mouth to droop. Most are self limited but can take up to 6 months to improve. A few last and need surgery to correct the changes in the eye and the eating problems from the droopy mouth. ...Read more

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My mom has amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. (lou gehrigs). What is this exactly?

My mom has amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. (lou gehrigs). What is this exactly?

Bad disease: ALS damages the motor nerve cell in brain and spinal cord causing progressive arm and leg weakness, muscle flickering, with progressive disability. If the disease affects the lower part of the brain, problems with tongue atrophy, swallowing, and breathing can create major crises, and even need for tracheostomy. The sole available drug, Riluzole does delay trach, but no effect on strength. ...Read more

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What is frontotemporal type of dementia?

See below: It affects the frontal lobes (front) and temporal lobes (sides) of the brain. Onset is usually earlier than alzheimer's. Initial sx may involve changes in personality, judgement and social functioning. Pick's disease is one of the forms of the frontotemporal dementia. Here's a link to fuller description of the disease http://www.Alz.Org/alzheimers_disease_frontotemporal_dementia.Asp. ...Read more

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Doctors, what is the difference between sensory aphasia and conduction aphasia ?

Doctors, what is the difference between sensory aphasia and conduction aphasia ?

Repetition: With transcortical sensory aphasia the ability to repeat is spared. Comprehension is affected. Lots of connecting words are produced. Few substantive words. Repetition, however, is intact. With conductive aphasia comprehension and speech output are intact but one cannot repeat words or sentences. Conductive aphasia is quite rare. ...Read more

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What type of aphasia affects the stroke patient's ability to understand sarcasm, connotations, etc?

Usually R side.: Whereas stroke in the left hemisphere can affect a patient's ability to speak or to understand the words of speech, strokes in the right hemisphere (especially temporal and parietal) can affect the ability to understand the non-word aspects of language, such as tone, sarcasm, innuendo. ...Read more

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Anyone know what is a similar disease to motor neurone and spinocerebellar ataxia?

Anyone know what is a similar disease to motor neurone and spinocerebellar ataxia?

Usually not similar: Motor neuron disease and spinocerebellar ataxia (sca) are very different diseases. The former affects motor neurons that control voluntary muscle activity, while the latter are a group (nearly 60 different ones currently) of disease that are progressive, degenerative, and affect coordination. Sca-36 does have ataxia in combination with motor neuron disease, but this is the exception not the rule. ...Read more

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What is pseudobulbar palsy?

Pseudobulbar Palsy: Pseudobulbar palsy refers to a syndrome that appears to affect the brain stem. The cluster of symptoms include dysarthria, dysphagia and uncontrolled emotional outbursts. There are many neurological causes of pseudobulbar palsy. ...Read more

Dr. Eric Weisman
233 doctors shared insights

Loss Of Speech (Definition)

Mutism = inability to speak. Aphasia = loss of ...Read more


Dr. Steven Beer
53 doctors shared insights

Speech Deficits (Definition)

Speech deficits = ...Read more