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Doctor insights on: Blown Pupil

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Pupil (Definition)

The pupil is the opening in the iris inside of the eye though which light is focused on the retinal film at the back of the eye. The iris can open and close in response to light to vary the amount inside the eye. It is what looks red, in the ...Read more


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Please explain why might someone's pupils be blown?

Please explain why might someone's pupils be blown?

Blown pupils : Are dilated pupils. This can occur for a variety of reasons. Drugs, both legal and illegal, poisonings, and in conditions affecting the brain like head trauma, stroke, tumor or bleeding. ...Read more

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My sister was without oxygen for an extended period. She's on life support but her pupils are blown. Is there any chance she'll come back or are we prolonging the inevitable?

My sister was without oxygen for an extended period. She's on life support but her pupils are blown. Is there any chance she'll come back or are we prolonging the inevitable?

The : The brain requires a constant, robust supply of oxygen and glucose (carried by the blood) to maintain function and to avoid injury. We get an intuitive sense of this from phenomena like fainting, or when wrestlers use "choke holds" on their opponents. Depending on the circumstances, it can take only a couple of minutes for the brain to be permanently injured by lack of blood supply. This injury is called an "anoxic brain injury" or a "hypoxic-ischemic brain injury." a serious anoxic brain injury often results in a patient who has a degree of coma, or is brain dead, and is usually on a breathing machine (called a ventilator). There are a number of ways to measure the chances of "coming back" from such a serious situation. These include very simple things like a neurological examination done under very specific conditions that exclude the chances of mistake, including eliminating any medications that could produce sedation or paralysis, correcting any severe problems with blood chemistry (like low blood sugar), and making sure the patient warm. Very good research has shown that two examination findings are very good at predicting a future of severe neurological impairment or death when they are present at the 72 hour point. These two findings are: 1) absent pupillary reflex (constriction of the pupils to light) or absent corneal reflex (blinking when a drop of water or other stimulus is touched to the surface of the eye); 2) no movement or something called "extensor" movement, when an uncomfortable stimulus is applied to the limbs. When doubt remains, there are additional tests that can be done. These include brainwave tests (including eeg and something called somatosensory evoked potentials or sseps), brain imaging studies, and lab tests (including something called neuron-specific enolase). In most cases, these additional tests do not have to be done. Even when patients who experience cardiac arrest receive a fairly new treatment in which they are chilled to below normal body temperature (called hypothermia), studies indicate that absent pupillary reflexes at day 3 are predictive of poor outcome. There is also the rule of common sense. Each day that someone doesn't "come back" decreases the chance that they will. For example, about half of all patients who will awaken will do so by day 2, and about 90% of patients who will awaken will do so by day 3. As the days march on, the chances get smaller and smaller, reaching a point comparable to the miraculous. While almost everyone likes to hope for miracles, we also seem to be able to recognize reality at the same time. It is tempting to want "one more day" to see if things change, but each day also comes at a considerable risk to the patient, whose body is exposed to challenges like blood clots, organ failures, and infections with each passing moment. Doctors and nurses are all very familiar with the facts and emotions behind such sad events and are usually eager to be available for family conferences to discuss specific situations. ...Read more

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Pupil is blown out, recent head injury no bleeding or loss of consciousness, dizzy and disoriented, could it be treated at home?

Pupil is blown out, recent head injury no bleeding or loss of consciousness, dizzy and disoriented, could it be treated at home?

Urgent evaluation: A blown pupil following trauma could be from orbital injury, but, much more worrisome, would be something compressing on the responsible nerve in the brain, such as from brain swelling. This needs to be checked out immediately. ...Read more

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Take lyrica, (pregabalin) 2rd time L pupil has blown.lasted 2 dys -2010 w neg CT. mvc head trauma-4/14- neg CT. 2wks ago L pup. blown x 1dy. tonight R 4 L 3. ?

Take lyrica, (pregabalin)  2rd time L pupil has blown.lasted 2 dys -2010 w neg CT. mvc head trauma-4/14- neg CT. 2wks ago L pup. blown x 1dy. tonight R 4 L 3. ?

Anisocoria: This may be related to some chemical or medication you are getting in your eye. Nasal sprays, eye drops, cough syrups, etc are common offenders. There is nothing in your brain that is going to cause your pupil to do this then return to normal size. Simple exam at the eye doc when s symptoms occur should be able to sort this out, but you may be able to figure it out yourself. ...Read more

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How is it that someone's pupils might be blown?

Several things: The most common reason for enlarged pupils is they made a recent trip to an eye doctor who used pupilary dilators. Much less common is exposure to certain drugs which can do this which includes purposeful treatment with dilators for certain conditions like uveitis. Pupils are also blown in brain hemorrhage and obstructions especially after head trauma. ...Read more

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What excatly is pinpoint pupils?

Very small pupils: Here's a picture of a pinpoint pupil (a very small pupil) http://pinterest.Com/pin/1829656070223741/. ...Read more

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How small and large can the pupil get?

How small and large can the pupil get?

A Complicated Issue: The pupil can get as small as a"pinpoint"or so large it fills up the whole space and you look like a zombie. Depends on the cause Uh,you're not a zombie, are you? Usually those extremes aren't reached and the pupils are "small" (like 2mm)or"large"(taking up maybe 2/3 of the space).Why do you ask?Have you entered a Zombie pupil dilatation contest?Well, sorry, if you're dead they'd be "mid-position! ...Read more

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Tiny white dot in my pupil. What could it be?

Tiny white dot in my pupil. What could it be?

Get it checked: The pupil is the black space where there is a central opening in the colored iris. So, there should not be a white dot in the pupil as this would actually be inside the eye. It is probably on the cornea, which is the clear dome over top of the iris and pupil. However, a white spot on the cornea is not good, as it could be an ulcer, a foreign body, or scar. ...Read more