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Doctor insights on: Blindness Permanent Temporal Artiritis

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Would someone with temporal arteritis go blind very fast if left untreated? Or could someone have it for a long time untreated & not go blind?

Would someone with temporal arteritis go blind very fast if left untreated? Or could someone have it for a long time untreated & not go blind?

TA: Blindness due to temporal arteritis comes from occlusion of the artery that supplies blood flow to the eye. Occlusion happens suddenly - sight one minute and blind the next. Not everyone with TA becomes blind but that is the major risk of the disease and the reason that we treat aggressively and early. ...Read more

Dr. Thomas Namey
2,400 doctors shared insights

Arthritis (Definition)

A condition where there is progressive degeneration of one or more joints. Symptoms may include joint pain, swelling, decreased motion, and stiffness. The two most common types of arthritis are osteoarthritis, which is associated first with articular cartilage breakdown with a component of inflammation, and rheumatoid arthritis, which is a systemic autoimmune disorder that affects joint linings first and secondarily ...Read more


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What are my chances of going blind with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis jra?

What are my chances of going blind with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis jra?

Small: First, you need to know which type of jra (a.K.A. Jia or juvenile idiopathic arthritis) you have as the risk of eye disease varies with the different types. Even if you are in a category of increased risk, the chance of blindness is small with proper screening and follow-up. ...Read more

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What produces blindness in the peripheral visual field of each eye's temporal hemiretinal half?

What produces blindness in the peripheral visual field of each eye's temporal hemiretinal half?

Hemi-field loss: Is usually due to a pathology posterior (behind) to the eye itself. A lesion or area of pathology will usually be located from the area of the pituitary gland (approx. just forward of central brain) where the optic nerves cross to anywhere along the optic radiation ending at the occipital lobe (portion of the brain at the lower back of the skull). An MRI or CT can usually identify the cause. ...Read more

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Can my mother live alone? She has temporal arteritis; she is now blind in one eye; she is insulin diabetic; she has inflamatory bowl disease

Can my mother live alone? She has temporal arteritis; she is now blind in one eye; she is insulin diabetic; she has inflamatory bowl disease

It's : It's really not possible to say for sure without knowing your mother's overall performance status. There are people with the conditions you've described who would do well on their own , but there are others who would be overwhelmed by any one of them. I guess my biggest concern would be whether she can see well enough to check her blood sugar and give herself insulin. If she's getting steroids for the arteritis, her blood sugar will be very high and difficult to manage. ...Read more

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I have temporal arteritis doctor said I should only worry about headaches on side of my temple. Headaches else where shouldn't worry me but they do I am unsure about when to increase steroids fear of blindness.?

I have temporal arteritis doctor said I should only worry about headaches on side of my temple. Headaches else where shouldn't worry me but they do I am unsure about when to increase steroids fear of blindness.?

Biopsy?: Depending on how long you've been on steriods you may want to consider a biopsy to confirm the diagnosis. The longer you've been treated the more likely you are to have a less helpful - false negative - result. Your doctor may also follow some blood work (ESR) to see how you are responding to treatment. ...Read more

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Hi, i'm 37 f. Suffering pain, tingles & weakness in hands, dropping things, night time blindness in r eye, hearing loss&tiredness, could it be arthritis?

Hi, i'm 37 f. Suffering pain, tingles & weakness in hands, dropping things, night time blindness in r eye, hearing loss&tiredness, could it be arthritis?

Complicated: Your presentation is very complicated and will likely need a number of specialists to figure out. There are a few rare disorders linking loss of vision with hearing loss that are in the 'arthritis' family. Consider consulting with ophthalmology, otolaryngology, and rheumatology to find the correct diagnosis. ...Read more

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Is iritis lead to permanent blind?

Is iritis lead to permanent blind?

It may: It depends on the cause of it. Iritis is frequently autoimmune and may be a sign of a more complicated disease. Traumatic iritis can be pretty bad and cause permanent blindness quicker than that of other causes. ...Read more

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Can your eyesight ever return from having temporal artiritis?

Can your eyesight ever return from having temporal artiritis?

Unlikely: It's not impossible but it is unlikely. Only 5-15% of patients who suffer visual loss from gca have any improvement in vision at all after the initial insult, and complete recovery is unusual. ...Read more

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What diseases may cause permanent, irreversible blindness?

What diseases may cause permanent, irreversible blindness?

Depends: Top causes of permanent, irreversible blindness in the us include diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma and macular degeneration. Other causes in other parts of the world include infections, like trachoma. The american academy of ophthalmology recommends routine eye exams starting at age 40 in part to detect any of the above diseases before vision loss is permanent. ...Read more

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Could migraine headaches make someone permanently blind?

Could migraine headaches make someone permanently blind?

Accurate Diagnosis: A migraine headache should not cause a permanent loss of vision. However, other types of headaches could be associated with permanent visual loss so a proper diagnosis is crucial. ...Read more

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Can pres cause permanent cortical blindness?

Can pres cause permanent cortical blindness?

Usually reversible: Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (pres) is a syndrome characterized by headache, confusion, seizures and visual loss. There have been reported cases presenting with cortical blindness with near or complete recovery of vision. There are many implicated causes, including ecclampsia, malignant hypertension, tacrolimus and Cyclosporine use, hypercalcemia. Treatment depends on the cause. ...Read more

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Advice? Would solar retinopathy lead to permanent blindness?

Partial loss: Solar retinopathy occurs when the sun or a bright light like a laser is focused long enough on one spot of the retina to thermally damage the light receptors. It will cause loss of vision in that area alone but the rest of the eye will remain visually normal. Ophthalmologists treat some retinal conditions with focused laser which destroys that spot but the rest of the retina remains the same. ...Read more

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Could you go blind permanently?

Yes: Many diseases can cause blindness. If you are concerned about this, visit an ophthalmologist on a regular basis. ...Read more

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What disease can cause permanent blindness?

Many, many diseases: The most common diseases that blind people in the U.S. Are diabetes, glaucoma and macular degeneration. There are many others. If you are concerned about this, see an ophthalmologist on a regular basis. ...Read more

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What diseases can cause permanent blindness?

What diseases can cause permanent blindness?

Usually chronic ds: mainly diabetes and macular degeneration is common outside of childhood blindness, corneal opacities, glaucoma, trachoma, and onchocerciasis. There are other causes that are progressive in nature, and in other countries out of the US it can be cataracts that aren't treated. In the US, it's a reversible cause of blindness if it can have it surgically treated. ...Read more

Dr. Damien Luviano
59 doctors shared insights

Blindness (Definition)

Vision impairment and blindness are conditions in which a person cannot see well or see at all, even with glasses or contact lenses. If a person's best vision (with correction) out of either eye is only 20/70 - 20/200, he is impaired. If he can see no better than 20/200 or his visual field is no more than 20 degrees (severe "tunnel" vision), ...Read more


Dr. Tim Conrad
433 doctors shared insights

Loss Of Vision (Definition)

Loss of vision reflects the inability to perceive images. Such a phenotype can be due to occlusive or barriers to light (e.g. cataracts) through retinal alterations (e.g. wet macular degeneration) to optic nerve lesions (e.g. from a pituitary adenoma) to central nervous system ...Read more