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Doctor insights on: Best Air Embolism Treatment

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What is the treatment for air embolism?

What is the treatment for air embolism?

Oxygen, hyperbaric: Depending on the cause of air embolism, treatment with oxygen or in severe cases with hyperbaric oxygen may be needed. Introduction of less than 100 cc of air in the venous side may not require specific treatment. Air embolism due to decompression sickness is the main reason for using hyperbaric oxygen, i.e., putting the patient in a chamber with high pressure. ...Read more

Dr. Geoffrey Rutledge
97 doctors shared insights

Air Embolism (Definition)

Blood vessels are made to carry blood - liquid. A small amount of air in a vessel is not usually a big deal as it will be absorbed into the blood. Larger volumes of air (10 mL or larger) can be significant to block blood flow in that vessel. That is bad in the brain (stroke) and really bad in the heart because ...Read more


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What are treatments for air embolism?

Recompression: Recompression is the most effective treatment of an air embolism. Normally this is carried out in a recompression chamber where as pressure increase the solubility of a gas increases. It is also important to promptly place the patient in trendelenburg position (head down) and on their left side. This positioning helps to trap air in the apex of the ventricle. ...Read more

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What are the treatments for air embolism from an iv?

What are the treatments for air embolism from an iv?

Depends. : Small amount (a few bubbles) are generally very well tolerated and do not need any treatment. Large amounts entering the central veins, especially during prodedures like a central line placement, is more concerning. The best "treatment" is prevention - like keeping the patients head below the heart. If air embolism occurs we are taught to position patients certain ways and aspirate. ...Read more

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Help doctors! what're the treatments for air embolism from an iv?

Left side down: Time the oxygen and co2 clear quickly. Nitrogen is 80% and slower to absorb. But if it stays in the upside chambers, by lying on left sued, it will break up and go to lungs and be slowly absorbed. Unless IV on pump and large volume, risk is low. ...Read more

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How do you treat an air embolism?

Hyperbaric Chamber: The use of 100% oxygen, breathed under increased atmospheric pressure in a hyperbaric chamber, is commonly used to treat air-embolism. This is especially true for those emboli that impair circulation to the nervous system/brain. ...Read more

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Is an air embolism after 24 hrs possible?

Highly unlikely: Where should the air come from? Why are you concerned about air embolism? 24 hours after what? Injection of air may cause embolism, within seconds or minutes. But 24 hours? Makes no sense. ...Read more

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Would i die right away from an air embolism?

Air embolism: An air embolism is a real issue but death only occurs when significant enough air goes through to block adequate blood flow. Fortunately in most air embolisms the end result is not death. ...Read more

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I would like info about air embolism please help?

Definition...: An air embolism occurs when air is introduced into the vascular system. In order for it to cause significant harm, it would need to be a fairly large amount of air introduced into one of the more central blood vessels. It can result in cardiac arrest and possibly death if the air is not removed quickly. It is a risk of certain procedures like central line (type of iv) placement and removal. ...Read more

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What is the definition or description of: Air embolism?

BAD: Blood vessels are made to carry blood - liquid. A small amount of air in a vessel is not usually a big deal as it will be absorbed into the blood. Larger volumes of air (10 mL or larger) can be significant to block blood flow in that vessel. That is bad in the brain (stroke) and really bad in the heart because it will stop beating. ...Read more

Dr. Austina Cho
1 doctor shared a insight

Embolus (Definition)

Usually a blood clot that migrates from one area of the body to another. Most commonly a clot from a leg vein to the lung . It can also pertain to a clot, or atheromatous material that moves from one segment to another, such as cholesterol material in a carotid lesion moving into the ...Read more