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Doctor insights on: Benign Myoclonic Epilepsy

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What is benign rolandic epilepsy?

What is benign rolandic epilepsy?

Common condition: About 1 percent of all children will have symptoms of benign focal seizures. The eeg will show focal polyphasic discharges in the central-temporal region of the brain, and the child is otherwise normal. Events often occur from sleep. Common age is from 5 years to 12 years. Most are outgrown. There are many names but very similar symptoms. ...Read more

Dr. Andrew Reeves
543 doctors shared insights

Epileptic Seizures (Definition)

Epileptic seizures. Per Mayo Clinic "Epilepsy is a central nervous system disorder (neurological disorder) in which nerve cell activity in the brain becomes disrupted, causing seizures or periods of unusual behavior, sensations and sometimes loss of ...Read more


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What is juvenile myoclonic epilepsy?

What is juvenile myoclonic epilepsy?

A form of epilepsy..: Usually seen in adolescents - described as involuntary spasms (or jerking) of an upper extremity (such as flinging a comb or a toothbrush) which may, about 1/4 of the time, also demonstrate generalized seizures later in life. Most do not, however. Usually worse in kids that are overly fatigued (e.g. Staying up late/poor sleep) and can sometimes be attributed to "typical teen behavior". ...Read more

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What are myoclonic seizures?

What are myoclonic seizures?

Generalized Seizure: Myoclonic seizures are a type of generalized convulsive seizure characterized by brief, repetitive muscle contractions. (the prefix myo- means muscle.) they usually involve both sides of the cerebral cortex. ...Read more

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Are myclonic jerks actually seizures?

Myoclonic jerks: There is a type of seizure called myoclonic, or myoclonic jerks. These are a feature of myoclonic epilepsy. These feel like a brief episode of shaking. They may occur in the morning time more often than other times. Sleep deprivation may make them more noticeable. ...Read more

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Is monoclonal epilepsy, tonic clonic seizure, tonic seizure and clonic seizure are the same ( grand mal)?

Is monoclonal epilepsy, tonic clonic seizure, tonic seizure and clonic seizure are the same ( grand mal)?

No: Juvenile moloclonal epilepsy is a generalized epilepsy, which occurs in the age group from 12-16yo. Grand mal seizures are usually generalized type of seizures and has two phases. In the tonic phase, loss of conciousness occurs and muscle contraction causes the person to fall down. The clonic phase is the rhythmic contraction of muscles, alternating b/w flexion and relaxation. Thanks. ...Read more

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What are tonic-clonic (grand mal) seizures?

Whole lotta shaking: As jerry lee lewis says. Grand mal seizures are the kind of seizure that most people think of: people pass out, and their muscles contract violently. It usually lasts less than 5 minutes. Sometimes people have only 1 seizure & never have it again. Sometimes people have more than 1 seizure & need to take medicine to prevent them. ...Read more

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Hi,Is focal generalized epilepsy different to petit mal.

Hi,Is focal generalized epilepsy different to petit mal.

It is different: Focal epilepsy (localization-related epilepsy) is due to focal brain pathology or part of genetic syndrome or unknown cause. Many types of focal epilepsy involving different parts of the brain.Onset in adolescent or adult. Petit mal (childhood absence epilepsy) happened mostly in school age children with frequent episodes of profound impairment of consciousness or subtle changes. Consult neurology ...Read more

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What is petit mal epilepsy?

What is petit mal epilepsy?

Petit mal: Petit mal (Fr. 'little illness) or absence seizures are forms which are characterized by a brief alteration of consciousness, and usually not followed by the post-ictal phase (sleepiness). It can appear as if the person is 'staring into space' and can be quite subtle. ...Read more

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What are myoclonic jerks?

What are myoclonic jerks?

Muscle jerks: Brief sudden shocklike muscle jerk, which can be focal or widespread and secondary to central nervous system issue. ...Read more

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Is nocturnal epilepsy hereditary?

Is nocturnal epilepsy hereditary?

Nocturnal epilepsy: Some are. Others are not. Most neurologists would be able to tell you if they feel that yours is genetic based. ...Read more

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Are tonic clonic seizures only a symptom of epilepsy?

Epilepsy: is by definition recurrent unprovoked seizures. Recurrent provoked seizures are seen on occasion (for example the alcoholic who uses up his SSI monthly stipend who presents to the ER with alcohol withdrawal seizures on the 29th of the month) GTC seizures can occur for many reasons (taking too much Ultram, caffeine, cocaine, hypomagnesemia, hyponatremia, hypocalcemia, withdrawal from Benzodiazepine ...Read more

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What is the difference between myoclonic epilempsy and benign myoclonic epilempsy?

What is the difference between myoclonic epilempsy and benign myoclonic epilempsy?

Not much: Benign Myoclonic epilepsy may be simply "twiching" of a muscle or group of muscles. With increasing severity the twitching may spread or be prolonged. A neurologist should be consulted since treatment is available. ...Read more

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What are atonic seizures?

What are atonic seizures?

Loss of tone: Some complex epileptic have drop attacks=fall to the floor because of loss of muscle tone in legs usually have other seizures like tonic= totally stiff or starring spells in same child--or myoclonic seizures like simple jerks of trunk or limb. ...Read more

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May have inherited epilepsy--generalized seizures on awakening, teen onset-- partial seizures with weird jaw sensation, too--possible myoclonic jerk?

?JME?: Not sure of your precise question, but will attempt an analysis. You may possess juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, and if correct, your best drugs might be either Depakote or keppra, (levetiracetam) (lamictal may not work quite as well here. Yet, you may be sub-therapeutic based on your description). Also, you seem to have several complexities, and i wonder how all these inter-relate. Go over this with neurologist. ...Read more

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Could juvenile myoclonic epilepsy symptoms worsen after your first grand mal seizure?

Could juvenile myoclonic epilepsy symptoms worsen after your first grand mal seizure?

Could : Most folks with jme respond well to modest doses of depakote, but a small percentage have difficult-to-control seizures. It might seem like it gets worse after the first convulsion simply because the convulsions don't come under control. ...Read more

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Autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy?

Autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy?

Seizures at night: A genetic form of epilepsy with onset in childhood, associated with clusters of seizures most nights, during sleep. Seizures are from the frontal lobe and often involve wild movements of the arms and legs. Need to try prevent injury from seizures. Treatable condition with antiseizure medications, but often difficult to control completely. Sometimes improves in adulthood. ...Read more

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What are tonic-clonic seizures (TCS)?

Generalized seizures: These seizures have 2phases. The first is a generalized stiffening of the body. The second consists of jerking movements of the extremities one trunk ...Read more

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What is the difference between Epilepsy with Grand Mal Seizures on Awakening and Juveinile Myoclonic Epilepsy?

Different names for: These are different names for Seizures(doctors call it Epilepsy, if the condition is persistent). You should be checked by a neurologist, unless already done. ...Read more

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What are absence (petit mal) seizures?

What are absence (petit mal) seizures?

Staring spells.: A child with absence seizures will stop what they are doing once in a while, stare into space, and then resume activity without noticing the break. An EEG while sleep-deprived and/or hyperventilating shows characteristic changes, which a neurologist can use to confirm the diagnosis. It is usually treatable. ...Read more

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Dr. Andrew Reeves
698 doctors shared insights

Epilepsy (Definition)

A neurological disorder where nerve cells of the brain are injured, epilepsy results in seizures that range from nearly undetectable to extremely vigorous. Causes of epilepsy include genetics, head trauma, prenatal ...Read more


Dr. William Singer
1,062 doctors shared insights

Seizure Disorder (Definition)

Seizure disorder also known as epilepsy, is a neurological condition in which the brain's abnormal electrical activity causes muscular convulsions and altered mental states. Epilepsy is diagnosed when an individual has ...Read more