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Doctor insights on: Autoimmune Disorders Carbon Monoxide

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When is carbon monoxide formed?

When is carbon monoxide formed?

Incomplete combustio: Generally, it's formed from incomplete combustion of fossil fuels. In chemistry, a hydrocarbon should burn in oxygen to carbon dioxide and water. However, other by-products may form such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen, and sulfur containing compounds. Carbon monoxide is dangerous because it preferentially and more tightly binds to hemoglobin molecules than oxygen. Cells can't use co so they die. ...Read more

Autoimmune (Definition)

The immune system developed to tell our own, normal cells (self) from foreign and abnormal cells (non-self). This lets the immune system eliminate viruses, bacteria, fungi and cancer cells from our body without harming normal cells. Sometimes the immune system fails to tell self from non-self and it attacks normal cells, for example in ...Read more


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What are the negative health effects of carbon monoxide?

What are the negative health effects of carbon monoxide?

Hurts O2 delivery: Carbon monoxide acts by keeping red blood cells from picking up oxygen so it hurts you by starving the body for oxygen. Once the co separates off the red cell it starts working again and theprocess stops. If the lack of oxygen was severe enough to cause damage to parts of the body it will take time for that to be repaired, but otherwise there shouldn't be long-term problems. ...Read more

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What's the risk of carbon monoxide in the blood?

What's the risk of carbon monoxide in the blood?

Danger of carbon mon: Carbon monoxide is a toxin affecting the brain.The carbon monoxide displaces oxygen carried by hemoglobin. As a result, damage comes from the lack of oxygen. ...Read more

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Can you tell me how is carbon monoxide poisonous ?

Can you tell me how is carbon monoxide poisonous ?

Stops oxygen use: Carbon monoxide binds the the part of red blood cells that carry oxygen. As more of those binding sites get clogged with the CO less oxygen is carried to the body's organs. The binding is reversible so once the exposure stops the CO will fall off the hemoglobin after several hours and the red cells will work properly. That's why the treatment for exposure is to give 100% oxygen. ...Read more

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I breathed in smoke/carbon monoxide, should I be concerned?

I breathed in smoke/carbon monoxide, should I be concerned?

Don't worry: Generally inhaled smoke and gases have an immediate effect and, after the exposure ceases, if you have no symptoms you will be fine. If you have any persistent symptoms after exposure: cough, pain, burning, wheezing, or chest tightness, go see a doctor for evaluation. ...Read more

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Does dizziness from carbon monoxide go away once fresh air?

Does dizziness from carbon monoxide go away once fresh air?

Slowly: Carbon monoxide "glues" itself to our red blood cells so that they can't carry oxygen. The most important thing is to stop the exposure then what has already gotten into your system will slowly get cleared out over several hours. It's important to keep in mind that medical treatment, especially using pure oxygen, can improve recovery time. ...Read more

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Would eosinophils be elevated with carbon monoxide exposure?

Would eosinophils be elevated with carbon monoxide exposure?

No: Eosinophils are part of the immune system that react in allergy situations. They are typically elevated when there are drug reactions or parasite infections. The lab finding that is seen in carbon monoxide exposure is elevated carboxyhemoglobin. ...Read more

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What are the effects of nicotine and carbon monoxide when inhaled?

What are the effects of nicotine and carbon monoxide when inhaled?

Both are different: Nicotine acts on cholinergic receptors in the body, and when inhaled go immediately to the central nervous system and elsewhere to do their thing - cause central relaxation, muscle relaxation, but focussed attention. Carbon monoxide is bound irreversibly to hemoglobin in our red cells, making them unable to carry oxygen. The body compensates by making more red blood cells, which can cause harm too ...Read more

Dr. Tania Dempsey
90 doctors shared insights

Autoimmune Conditions (Definition)

The body is reacting to something that is indigenous to itself. It is acting as if it is a foreign invader , and 'fighting" it. This is not ...Read more