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Doctor insights on: Athleta Outlet

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What's neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome?

Nerve symptoms: Tos caused by nerve ; artery impingement as pass through costoclavicular dimension between clavicle (collar bone) ; top first rib; space about one centimeter in life. When joints ; muscles of shoulder girdle injured, space prematurely closes with arm raising. Nerve symptoms are tingling ; numbness pinky side of hand ; forearm. Artery symptoms of hand coolness ; ischemia. Nerve symptoms dramatic. ...Read more

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Whats thoracic outlet syndrome?

Whats thoracic outlet syndrome?

TOS: Tos involves the lower portion of the brachial plexus, where nerves from the neck pass through a tunnel into the chest on the way to the arm. The plexus can get trapped in the outlet area, and this event can cause pain, numbness, tingling, weakness, but can also affect blood vessels. On occasion, a congenital first rib can cause compression but trauma may also promote tos. ...Read more

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Thoracic outlet syndrome causes arm/neck pain how?

Thoracic outlet syndrome causes arm/neck pain how?

Crowding: Pressure on brachial plexus the nerves from the spinal cord to arm become a group of nerves called the brachial plexus it is compressed by a crowding from an extra rib on top of the rib cage 1st rib or extra cervical rib the working theory goes adfitionally vascular compression of brachial artery or vein can produce arm symptoms nerve pain can extend proximal to neck or distal to arm and hand. ...Read more

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Can surgery make neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome worse?

Can surgery make neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome worse?

Well... yes...: surgery is cutting on tissue. It can irritate the nerve and/or produce scar tissue. It would be expected to open up the area to allow the nerve to not be compressed but the consequences of surgery often produce similar situations even when done right. ...Read more

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Is thoracic outlet syndrome fatal?

Is thoracic outlet syndrome fatal?

No.: There is no known mortality associated with thoracic outlet syndrome, but complications can arise during surgical treatment. ...Read more

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Dr. Timothy Wu Dr. Wu
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Can thoracic outlet syndrome or any other brachial plexus issues cause scapular instability/winging?

Dr. Timothy Wu Dr. Wu
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Winged Scapula: A "winged scapula" is a result of injury to the long thoracic nerve which innervates the serratus anterior muscle. The long thoracic nerve is made up of portions of the brachial plexus, namely cervical roots 5, 6, 7, so in theory, a brachial plexus injury can cause a winged scapula but it is unlikely to be in isolation of other nerve problems. Winged scapula is not typical in thoracic outlet. ...Read more

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Is surgery for thoracic outlet syndrome unreliable?

TOS: TOS is combinations of many problems in a complex anatomic location. There are so simple diagnostics or solutions. If properly diagnosed, AND non surgical therapies like PT fail to improve the symptoms, then surgery with an experienced TOS surgeon can be both therapeutic and reliable. Take friend with you to appointments and therapy. Be well. ...Read more

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Is thoracic outlet syndrome surgery a major surgery?

Is thoracic outlet syndrome surgery a major surgery?

Yes: This is a relatively rare operation that should be done by someone with experience. Results are best when the compression is of an artery or vein, less good for nerve compression. Complications include failure of surgery, damage to nerves and blood vessels to arm, nerve to diaphragm or shoulder muscles and "pneumothorax" (air in the chest). Helpful for the right indications, EXPERIENCE IS KEY ...Read more

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Can thoracic outlet syndrome be cured?

Quite often: Several centers of expertise thruout the usa now exist with surgeons possessing great experience. Success rates are approaching 80-85 % in carefully selected cases, whose preoperative testing is definitive. Excellent outcomes can be found at ucla, johns hopkins, washington univ. In st louis, and psl in denver, co. ...Read more

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Do patients return to sports after surgery for neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome?

Do patients return to sports after surgery for neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome?

They can: Yes, they certainly can, especially at a recreational level. Any surgery can effect an athlete at a high competitive level, depending on the demands of the sport and the surgery that was performed. For instance, if you're a pitcher is the major or minor leagues, it may be difficult to return to your presurgical velocity due to surgical insult and change in mechanics. ...Read more

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Can first rib fracture cause thoracic outlet syndrome?

Can first rib fracture cause thoracic outlet syndrome?

1st rib fx & TOS: Trauamtic 1st rib fractures can contribute to TOS especially when there is a non-union (fracture pieces do not heal back together as one unit. Pieces press on vessels & nerves). Hemorrhage from the fracture into the thoracic outlet can also contribute to TOS (compression of vessels & nerves by blood). ...Read more

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Is first rib resection statistically successful for fixing neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome?

Is first rib resection statistically successful for fixing neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome?

Yes: It is important that the diagnosis be correct and be confirmed with muscle blocks and the appropriate nerve test. surgery requires that the scalene muscles in the neck be released. this can be done by removing the muscles through the neck, sometimes with rib removal, but rib removal is not always necessary. Success rate is about 90 percent some improvement; 75 percent good improvement. ...Read more

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How can snapping scapula syndrome and thoracic outlet syndrome be related?

How can snapping scapula syndrome and thoracic outlet syndrome be related?

Muscle imbalances: Imo tos results from superior trapezius (st) weak & collar bone droops toward first rib closing costoclavicular space (between these bones) clipping artery & nerves to arm. Weak st conscripts neighbor levator scapulae (ls) to burden lifting scapula (sc) & 20 lb. Arm. Long & narrow, ls incurs chronic spasm, tendonitis at insertion on superior sc spine (pick-like), & snapping as shoulder rotates. ...Read more

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Could a heart disease be misdiagnosed as athletic heart syndrome?

Could a heart disease be misdiagnosed as athletic heart syndrome?

It is possible: Unfortunately no medical test is perfect. There can be considerable overlap between how an athletic heart looks and how an abnormal heart looks on several heart tests, including electrocardiogram and echocardiogram. This is why it is important to take the whole patient in context with the tests, but I have to say even then distinguishing the two can be challenging. ...Read more

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What's thoracic output syndrome?

What's thoracic output syndrome?

Brachial plexus : Tos is caused by compression of usually the lower brachial plexus at the level of the medial cord. A congenital cervical rib may be present but trauma can also cause the problem. Pain and numbness especially on elevation of the arm is characteristic, but the subclavian artery or vein may be involved. Thus, both neurogenic and vascular problems separate or together. ...Read more

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Can thoracic outlet syndrome & diabetes lead to problems?

Can thoracic outlet syndrome & diabetes lead to problems?

Neuropathy: The combination is not unusual, as diabetes often causes peripheral nerve problems, and leads to susceptibility to tos, if an injury were to occur. The diabetic individual may possess delayed healing, and thereby, the problem may eventuate in a surgical approach. ...Read more

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Is thoracic outlet syndrome permanent?

Is thoracic outlet syndrome permanent?

Not necessarily.: Assuming that is correct diagnosis, this can commonly be helped with physical therapy. There may be necessity to consider surgical intervention for refractory symptoms, yet that surgery is commonly successful. This is a difficult diagnosis, to come to, so I would make sure you are comfortable with how you came to this diagnosis, and if not consider another opinion. ...Read more

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Could competitive flow reduce internal thoracic artery graft patency?

Could competitive flow reduce internal thoracic artery graft patency?

Absolutely: It can happen. If the vessel that is bypassed has significant flow, the mammary artery can fail. ...Read more

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