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Doctor insights on: Ataxia Gait

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Treatment for progressive gait imbalace and progressive dysarthria slurred speech?

Treatment for progressive gait imbalace and progressive dysarthria slurred speech?

Uncover cause: Likely best to see a neurologist. There are multiple problems which can cause this, and treatment follows diagnosis. ...Read more

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Gait (Definition)

Gait is the way locomotion is achieved using our limbs. Gait is defined as "bipedal, biphasic forward propulsion of center of gravity of human body, in which there is alternate movements of different segments of the body" . Different gaits are characterized by differences in limb movement patterns, overall velocity, forces, ...Read more


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What's spinocerebellar ataxia?

What's spinocerebellar ataxia?

Archaic term and : Not used in academic settings due to confused terminology. Was used to describe both hereditary and sporadic neurodegenerative ataxias, but now classify these based on genetic and molecular markers. Amongst these, friedreich's ataxia, ataxia telangiectasia, sca 1-7, mitochondrial. Ataxia is incoordination of movement due to cerebellar dysfunction. ...Read more

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How are cerebellar degeneration, cerebellar ataxia and paraneoplastic cerebellar related?

How are cerebellar degeneration, cerebellar ataxia and paraneoplastic cerebellar related?

Ataxia: Cerebellar degneration means that the part of the brain that controlls coordination and balance is losing cells and likely getting smaller. Ataxia is the clumsiness, imbalance, slurred speech and/or abnormal eye movements that can accompany cerebellar degeneration. A paraneoplastic cerebellar syndrome is when the body's immune response to cancer somewhere else damages the cerebellum "by mistake". ...Read more

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What are ataxia, cerebellar or spinocerebellar degeneration?

What are ataxia,  cerebellar or spinocerebellar degeneration?

Progressive disorder: Genetic and familial conditions can lead to a progressive degeneration of the cerebellum and brainstem structures. There are many different types. Multiple sclerosis can also cause progressive balance problems that can mimic degenerative disease. Tumors can also mimic degenerative disease. A quality MRI and good neurological evaluation is necessary. ...Read more

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Explain the condition called sudden loss of coordination (cerebellar ataxia).?

Explain the condition called sudden loss of coordination (cerebellar ataxia).?

Cerebellar Ataxia: Acute cerebellar ataxia is defined as the sudden loss of coordination or abnormal gait due to abnormal function of the cerebellum. Causes are vast, and include tumors, infectious diseases, and genetic (inherited) etiologies. This is best managed by a neurologist (specialist in the nervous system). ...Read more

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What can cause spinocerebellar ataxia?

What can cause spinocerebellar ataxia?

Variety of causes...: The causes of spinocerebellar ataxia span several pages, but can be categorized as: hereditary, infectious, medication-related, alcohol-related, traumatic, vitamin deficiency related, etc. The start of an evaluation for ataxia includes a detailed neurological exam by a movement disorder specialist and a brain MRI to see whether the cerebellum is indeed shrinking. ...Read more

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What illnesses cause ataxia and hyperreflexia?

What illnesses cause ataxia and hyperreflexia?

Some answers: Illnesses that affect the cerebellum and corticospinal tract, or the dorsal columns and corticospinal tract can cause these findings. Stroke is probably the most common, MS is also a possible explanation, there are also others (trauma, infection, neoplastic disease, etc.) ...Read more

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38 yo male, history epilepsy (med controlled), closed tbi (12/2011). Slurred speech, hand tremor, unsteady gait, confused, lethargic, normal pupils.

38 yo male, history epilepsy (med controlled), closed tbi (12/2011). Slurred speech, hand tremor, unsteady gait, confused, lethargic, normal pupils.

Timeline?: Your description does not state if all of these changes represent a change from the baseline, are new or chronic. If they are new then i would recommend going to your closest emergency room right away, if they are chronic and old then i would discuss this with your doctor as they could be consistent with traumatic brain injury. ...Read more

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Could having mild cerebral palsy cause an antalgic gait?

Could having mild cerebral palsy cause an antalgic gait?

Word games: The term antalgic refers to a gait that favors one leg to avoid pain in another. While possibly visibly the same in CP, that gait is generally due to abnormal motor function and not an effort to avoid pain. ...Read more

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Is memory loss normal in patients with? Friedreich's ataxia?

Is memory loss normal in patients with? Friedreich's ataxia?

Frederick's Ataxia: This type of ataxia involves the spinal cord & peripheral nerves, hence memory loss is not part of it. ...Read more

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Will an MRI without contrast show the beginning signs of MS? Symptoms: slurred speech, memory problems, unsteady gait, confusion, etc.

Will an MRI without contrast show the beginning signs of MS?
Symptoms: slurred speech, memory problems, unsteady gait, confusion, etc.

Complex question: There are 3 types of MRI used to diagnose MS: T1-weighted, T-2 weighted, and FLAIR. No single test is used to diagnose MS, generally a combination of tests over time is needed to get a definitive diagnosis. You need to consult a neurologist experienced with MS and let him or her guide you. Do you have a family history of this disease? Although chronic, progression can be very slow. Good luck! ...Read more

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What is friedreich ataxia?

Friedrich's ataxia: FA is a condition that causes weakness, scoliosis, ataxia, visual impairment, heart disease and diabetes mellitus. It is an inherited condition that normally affects people as a child or as a young adult. http://www.curefa.org/whatis.html ...Read more

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Whats multifocal motor neuropathy?

Whats multifocal motor neuropathy?

Neuropathy: Multifocal motor neuropathy is a progressive muscle disorder characterized by muscle weakness in the hands, with differences from one side of the body to the other in the specific muscles involved. It affects men much more than women. Symptoms also include muscle wasting, cramping, and involuntary contractions or twitching of the leg muscles. ...Read more

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Tremors in hands, weak legs, mem issues, cognitive decline, apathy, blurry vision, tach, headache, floaters...Could it be parkinsons? Dementia? Als?

Tremors in hands, weak legs, mem issues, cognitive decline, apathy, blurry vision, tach, headache, floaters...Could it be parkinsons? Dementia? Als?

See a neurologist: Only detailed history and neurological exam. Can determine. It could simply be anxiety neurosis but other conditions need to be ruled out first. ...Read more

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Involuntary movements, lost of sensation, speech impairement and imsomnia?

Involuntary movements, lost of sensation, speech impairement and imsomnia?

Complex: Many possibilities, including multiple sclerosis, hereditary disorder, but could be variety of different causes, so see a neurologist asap, and get answers. ...Read more

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Unsteady gait and prolonged light periods?

Unsteady gait and prolonged light periods?

Early ovarian: failure can lead to irregular menstruation. Any illness frankly can cause you to have irregular periods and unsteady gait. Check your nutrition, then make sure you don't have an infection such as vaginitis or sinusitis. Then check a pregnancy test. If negative, proceed to your healthcare provider for proper diagnosis and treatment. Thanks for trusting in HealthTap. ...Read more

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Is spino-cerebellar ataxia contagious?

No: Spinocerebellar degenerations are genetic disorders that run in families. There is no infectious component. ...Read more

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What is friedrichs ataxia?

Hereditary ataxia: An autosomal dominant disorder causing mitochondrial dysfunction and worsening due to oxidative stress. Spinal disorder usually presenting at a young age, with ataxia, dysarthria, leg weakness, numbness, pes cavus, scoliosis, and cardiomyopathy. Genetic testing for frataxin is confirmatory. There is a variation of ataxia with vitamin E deficiency which is similar, but responds to vit e. ...Read more

Dr. Lynne Weixel
193 doctors shared insights

Ataxia (Definition)

Ataxia means movements without coordination. People with ataxia have incoordination because the parts of the nervous system that control movement and balance are not working properly. Ataxia can be associated with infections, injuries, or degenerative changes in the central nervous system. Ataxias may be hereditary ...Read more


Dr. Jeffrey Wint
56 doctors shared insights

Loss Of Coordination (Definition)

Loss of coordination is a symptom in which some parts of a person's body should but do not work together in a coordinated way. One example is when several muscles move in an uncoordinated manner, ...Read more