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Doctor insights on: Arterial Lateral Sclerosis

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Is sclerosis of an arterial valve dangerous? I'm 32. I have a RBBB discovered on an EKG. Had an echo showing some sclerosis. something to worry about?

Is sclerosis of an arterial valve dangerous? I'm 32. I have a RBBB discovered on an EKG. Had an echo showing some sclerosis. something to worry about?

Probably not: At this time there is probably nothing to worry about (the cardiologist would have let you know if there was). I would simply adopt a healthy lifestyle of exercise, healthy eating, getting to a normal BMI. As long as the sclerosis doesn't affect the way the heart pumps blood (measured as ejection fraction) then it will not cause problems. RBBB is also pretty common and not dangerous. ...Read more

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Dr. Debra Rosenblatt
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Artery (Definition)

Arteries are defined as blood vessels which carry blood away from the heart (to either the body or lungs). Arteries: higher pressure, thicker walls, stretch (pulse) with each heart contraction & deliver blood to the arterioles which control the flow to individual capillaries. Veins are blood vessels which carry blood from capillaries back to the heart (body to right heart; ...Read more


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I am suffering from primary lateral sclerosis, is there a treatmnet?

I am suffering from primary lateral sclerosis, is there a treatmnet?

Yes there is: Primary lateral sclerosis is a form of lou gehrig's disease, which affects the motor neuron cell, and may involve a slow chronic course. The drug Riluzole is the only product on the market so far, and has shown some potential to prevent tracheostomy. Part of the treatment involves supportive care, and prevention of infections, so work closely with a team of experienced physicians. ...Read more

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Can you tell me if emg tests can be normal with primary lateral sclerosis?

Can you tell me if emg tests can be normal with primary lateral sclerosis?

Would be unlikely: If motor neuron disease exists, and could be in form of primary lateral sclerosis, there will usually be some degree of EMG pathology. A fully normal EMG would tend to rule against a diagnosis of any kind of motor neuron disease, but early on, findings might be very minimal and the test might need repetition in several months. ...Read more

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What is primary lateral sclerosis?

What is primary lateral sclerosis?

Variation of ALS: Motor neuron disease or ALS presents in several variable forms, and is a disease of motor neuron degeneration in brain and spinal cord. In the primary lateral sclerosis variant (only 1-3% of all cases), the disorder affects the upper motor neuron only, and is focal on one side or the other. By definition, this form would be far less malignant. ...Read more

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What are the symptoms of primary lateral sclerosis?

What are the symptoms of primary lateral sclerosis?

Variant of ALS: Als affects motor nerve cells, but varies in presentation. Diagnosis of primary lateral sclerosis is challenging, as involves upper motor neuron cells and early on, an EMG test could well be non-diagnostic, as it tests the lower cells. Since this variation involves central corticospinal cells, there is unilateral weakness of arm and/or leg without sensory loss. Later, loss of muscle bulk maybe. ...Read more

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Primary lateral sclerosis only 1 side, is this normal?

Not unexpected: Not surprising but this may not stay unilateral, or this may be the ultimate outcome. Motor neuron disorders vary in expression, but require attentive followup with a neuromuscular specialist on an ongoing basis. Riluzole may be of value. ...Read more

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What is the definition or description of: primary lateral sclerosis?

What is the definition or description of: primary lateral sclerosis?

Variation of ALS: Motor neuron disease or ALS presents in several variable forms, and is a disease of motor neuron degeneration in brain and spinal cord. In the primary lateral sclerosis variant (only 1-3% of all cases), the disorder affects the upper motor neuron only, and is focal on one side or the other. By definition, this form would be far less malignant. ...Read more

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What is amyotrophic lateral sclerosis?

Disease of nervecell: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or als, is a disease of the nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord that control voluntary muscle movement. Als does not affect the senses (sight, smell, taste, hearing, touch). It only rarely affects bladder or bowel function, or a person's ability to think or reason.The condition slowly gets worse and cause difficulty with breathing muscles. ...Read more

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What is amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (als)? 

Motor neuron disease: A disorder of misfolded proteins, attacking nerve cell bodies in spinal cord and brain. Tends to involve weakness not numbness, and can affect legs and arms with flickering of muscles, loss of muscle mass, and evenually problems with breathing and swallowing. Unfortunately, there is no cure, and it preserves awareness. Gratefully, it is relatively rare. ...Read more

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Could kids get amyotrophic lateral sclerosis?

Could kids get amyotrophic lateral sclerosis?

Similar : But most childhood illnesses which affect the motor neuron, like als, are quite rare, and more hereditary in origin. A variety of such disorders cause weakness in very young children, and adolescents and seem similar in outcome. Also, polio used to affect many children but is almost unknown in usa today. ...Read more

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What exactly is amyotrophic lateral sclerosis?

What exactly is amyotrophic lateral sclerosis?

Lou Gehrig's disease: Als is a disease affecting the nerve cell body, causes weakness, muscle wasting, and fasciculations or fluttering of the muscles. It can affect mobility, swallowing, and breathing. There is no known cure to date, and the prognosis is often very poor. We believe it is a disorder of "misfolded proteins", similar in some ways to alzheimer's and parkinson's, but a far rarer condition, fortunately. ...Read more

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Who first discovered amyotrophic lateral sclerosis?

Who first discovered amyotrophic lateral sclerosis?

Charcot: The French Neurologist Charcot is credited with the paper describing ALS as a distinct illness ...Read more

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What are the tests for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis?

Diagnosis: Since we hope to find alternative problems instead of als, we search for possible other diagnoses. The testing includes blood studies, especially for hyperthyroidism, MRI tests of the neck and spinal cord, EMG studies, and even muscle biopsies on occasion. ...Read more

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What sort of problem is amyotrophic lateral sclerosis?

Lou Gehrig's: Als also known as lou gehrig's disease is a disease of nerves. It is a progressive loss of muscle strength. Initial symptoms are usually muscle weakness or cramps followed by muscle paralysis in later stages. Difficulty breathing and swallowing are common due to the muscle weakness. There is no cure but there are medications to help with symptom management. ...Read more

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What are the symptoms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis?

What are the symptoms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis?

See below: The main symptoms of ALS are weakness. The weakness often starts with one hand and then may progress to the other. The legs will often become weak as well. The muscles begin to get thinner. This is called atrophy. There may also be exaggerated reflexes and stiffness in the muscles called spasticity. The muscles that help us speak and swallow and breath can also be weakened. ...Read more

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How is amyotrophic lateral sclerosis transmitted in humans?

It is not transmitte: It is not typically a heriditary or infectious disease. No one knows the exact cause. ...Read more

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What does it mean when a guy has amyotrophic lateral sclerosis?

Degenrative DO: Als is a neurologic disease where nerves in the central nervous system degenerate, leading to weakness. This can cause inability to walk or use the hands or arms, facial weakness, difficulty eating and swallowing, and respiratory difficulties, leading to infections like pneumonia. It is not a curable disease. ...Read more

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What is amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (als)? Can it be treated?

Lou Gehrig's disease: Als is a disease affecting the nerve cell body, causes weakness, muscle wasting, and fasciculations or fluttering of the muscles. It can affect mobility, swallowing, and breathing. There is no known cure to date, and the prognosis is often very poor. We believe it is a disorder of "misfolded proteins", similar in some ways to alzheimer's and parkinson's, but a far rarer condition, fortunately. ...Read more

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What are the challenges of living with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis?

Very difficult: ALS is a progressive nasty disease with NO cure or even significant control other than Riluzole, and causes muscular atrophy, weakness, fasciculations, and eventual inability to swallow or breathe. As you can imagine, these problems require extensive medical care and diligence, and interventions which may be very complex. ...Read more

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What is the definition or description of: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis?

Neurodegenerative: ALS is a neurodegenerative disease of the upper and lower motor neurons. There is a male predominance, and occurs most frequently between the ages of 50 - 60 years. While the most frequent form has a dire prognosis, it does have several variants, with different prognoses that can be prolonged with respect to survival. The diagnosis is based on the clinical findings and robust NCV/EMG studies. ...Read more

Dr. Shari Jackson
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Sclerosis (Definition)

We neurologists employ the term to describe localized damage involving the central nervous system, and sclerosis means scarring. If in many areas, might be multiple sclerosis. If affecting the motor nerve cell, ...Read more