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Doctor insights on: Arterial Insufficiency Vs Venous Insufficiency

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Does arterial insufficiency cause edema like chronic venous insufficiency?

Does arterial insufficiency cause edema like chronic venous insufficiency?

Venous edema: One of the hallmarks of chronic venous insufficiency is ankle and leg swelling. In the early stages of venous insufficiency, ankle and leg swelling occur at the end of the day and are relieved by leg elevation. In longstanding venous insufficiency, leg swelling is constant. Arterial insufficiency patients do not typically complain of lower extremity swellling. ...Read more

Dr. Katharine Cox
1 Doctor shared a insight

Artery (Definition)

Arteries are defined as blood vessels which carry blood away from the heart (to either the body or lungs). Arteries: higher pressure, thicker walls, stretch (pulse) with each heart contraction & deliver blood to the arterioles which control the flow to individual capillaries. Veins are blood vessels which carry blood from capillaries back to the heart (body to right heart; ...Read more


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Can both arterial insufficiency and venous insufficiency cause a cold leg? How are the two distinguished?

Can both arterial insufficiency and venous insufficiency cause a cold leg? How are the two distinguished?

No: Critical arterial insufficiency causes a cold, cyanotic, pulseless, painful leg. Venous insufficiency causes a swollen leg with dilated veins. The color can be normal or plethoric (reddish). If phlebitis is present, the leg may be painful, but uncomplicated venous insufficiency doesn't necessarily hurt. You mention knee swelling - do you have an effusion? If so, this is not vascular. ...Read more

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Should I go to Ed due to arterial insufficiency or ED due to venous leak?

Should I go to Ed due to arterial insufficiency or ED due to venous leak?

Both: They are separate entities and if you have them you may need to get urgent evaluation. However, you are better off making appointment with a vascular specialist if you can wait and it is not emergent. ...Read more

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What is the difference between chronic venous stasis and chronic arterial insufficiency?

What is the difference between chronic venous stasis and chronic arterial insufficiency?

Significant: Chronic venous stasis (cvi) is a result of long standing venous insufficiency due to malfunctioning of the valves of either the superficial, deep or both systems of veins. Chronic arterial insufficiency is due to long standing decrease arterial blood flow into either the legs or arms. Venous problems cause leg swelling and discoloration while arterial problems cause pain and even gangrene. ...Read more

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Which type of erectile dysfunction is worse? Ed due to arterial insufficiency or ED due to venous leak?

Which type of erectile dysfunction is worse? Ed due to arterial insufficiency or ED due to venous leak?

Eh...: In the old days, the answer would be simple: arterial insufficiency, because there was no meaningful way to increase flow without penile injections, but leak could often be addressed with a penile ring. Now, both are fairly readily treatable by a competent urologist. See one to determine the causes and to what extent the various solutions can help. ...Read more

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Is it possible to take care of penile arterial insufficiency?

Is it possible to take care of penile arterial insufficiency?

Perhaps: If the arteries to the penis are obstructed (by cholesterol deposits) balloon angioplasty and/or stenting can be performed to restore proper blood flow. This procedure is becoming a more common treatment for impotence. ...Read more

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If arterial insufficiency is questioned in relation to the fibular/peroneal artery, how should it be investigated?

If arterial insufficiency is questioned in relation to the fibular/peroneal artery, how should it be investigated?

Ankle-brachial index: The ankle-brachial index (ABI) result is used to predict the severity of peripheral arterial disease (PAD). A slight drop in your ABI with exercise means that you probably have PAD. This drop may be important, because PAD can be linked to a higher risk of heart attack or stroke. See your physician for discussion. Http://circ. Ahajournals. Org/content/94/11/3026.full ...Read more

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I discoveredthat my ed condition is caused by arterial insufficiency on the left side of my penis. The right side is ok. Is pentoxifyline a lower cost alternative? How about shockwave treatment?

I discoveredthat my ed condition is caused by arterial insufficiency on the left side of my penis. The right side is ok. Is pentoxifyline a lower cost alternative? How about shockwave treatment?

Lower than what?: Lower cost than what? Pentoxiflyline 400 mg 3X a day as a generic meds cost $120 a month and is indicated for claudication, not ED. I'm not aware that either pentoxifyline or shock wave treatment is effective. How was the diagnosis made? If you had an arteriogram, I suspect angioplasty is your best bet, but at your age, 37, I suspect either you have small vessel disease or the dx is wrong. ...Read more

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How do they test for arterial insufficiency in a leg where the calf muscle cramps or reflects oxygen insufficiency, when there is a pulse at the foot.

How do they test for arterial insufficiency in a leg where the calf muscle cramps or reflects oxygen insufficiency, when there is a pulse at the foot.

Ultrasound first: First, a doppler exam of your pulses is performed. There are 3 major arteries below the knee. If 1 or more are missing or of poor amplitude, an arteriogram is perfomed. Sometimes at the same sitting, a narrowed artery can be dilated. ...Read more

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Is it safe to use Benadryl (diphenhydramine) daily if you have peripheral vascular/artery disease or chronic venous insufficiency?

It Is Safe: Benedryl is an antihistamine which block histamine release. It is safe to use with pad or chronic venous insufficiency.

Always remember though that if you are multiple medications sometime there can be an interaction between them so check with your doctor or pharmacist. ...Read more

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Is the discolouration from venous insufficiency reversible?

Is the discolouration from venous insufficiency reversible?

No: If you have discoloration, your venous insufficiency is serious and you are at risk of developing a leg ulcer, even if your legs feel fine. Elevate your legs. Wear compression stockings daily. See a phlebologist or vein specialist. Phlebology. Org for a referral. Treatment is office based and under and hour. Covered by almost all insurance. ...Read more

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What is the treatment for venous insufficiency?

What is the treatment for venous insufficiency?

Close bad veins: When superficial veins are insufficient, they are structurally broken. The vein walls are too stiff and don't have enough elastic in them. Vein valves that keep blood from flowing backwards are broken too. Nothing works right in these veins and we don't the technological ability to fix them yet. So we remove them. This can be done with surgery, sclerotherapy, and/or thermal ablation (laser/rf). ...Read more

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What are the risks of chronic venous insufficiency?

What are the risks of chronic venous insufficiency?

Cvi risks: Chronic venous insufficiency risks are symptomatic, like pain and throbbing, or physical, like swelling, inflammation, dermatitis, pigmentation, and ulceration.
Also, enlarged varicosities can encourage clot formation through stasis of blood flow. ...Read more

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What is the best treatment for venous insufficiency?

What is the best treatment for venous insufficiency?

See vein specialist: Your best choice is to see a vein specialist and be evaluated. Then you can get a recommendation that is specifically tailored to your needs. You will need a venous ultrasound evaluation to see if you have any underlying vein trouble that isn't visible at the surface. If you do and you have symptoms, treatment should be considered. Otherwise, compression stockings might be considered. ...Read more

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What are the treatment options for venous insufficiency?

What are the treatment options for venous insufficiency?

Grades of CVI: There is a classification of venous insufficiency called CEAP which grades venous insufficiency in 6 categories from 1 to 6 with 6 being the worse. 1 is spider veins, 2 is varicose veins, 3 is edema, 4 is skin changes, 5 is healed ankle ulcer and 6 is an active ulcer. There are treatments for each level. See a vein specialist. ...Read more

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Hi doctors, was just wondering what is chronic venous insufficiency?

Hi doctors, was just wondering what is chronic venous insufficiency?

Chronic venous insuf: Chronic venous insufficiency is due to the back flow of blood in the veins usually in the lower extremities. Back flow is usually protected by valves in the veins that become faulty over time allowing blood to pool. This increases the pressure of blood in the veins and fluid (and a small amount of blood) leaks into the tissues causing swelling, pain, inflammation, and on the skin ulcerations. ...Read more

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What is the trouble chronic venous insufficiency and what do people have to do to prevent it early on?

CVI: Terminology can be confusing. There is venous insufficiency (vi), or venous reflux as dr. Gotvald said, and there is chronic venous insufficiency (cvi). Cvi indicates that you have had severe reflux for a long time and there is already damage. On the other hand, although reflux is genetically determined and no preventable, if you have vi prevention of progression to cvi might be possible. ...Read more

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What is the definition or description of: Venous insufficiency?

CVI: Venous insufficiency is described as the reduced ability of the veins to provide an adequate return of blood back to the heart from the lower extremities. The fault typically is with the walls and/or the valves located in the veins of the legs. The failing valves allow a back flow of blood which increase the pressure on the vein walls thus resulting with varying degrees of pedal edema. ...Read more

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What does venous insufficiency mean anyways and what outlook for me?

What does venous insufficiency mean anyways and what outlook for me?

Valves malfunction.: Venous stasis is due to venous insufficiency which is a result of the valves in the venous system malfunctioning. This can be due to the valves in the deep system, superficial system or connecting system. Deep system valve malfunction could be due to prior clots, superficial problems could lead to varicose veins and perforator malfunction could lead to venous ulcers. ...Read more

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What's chronic venous insufficiency?

What's chronic venous insufficiency?

There are two types: Chronic venous insufficiency is when veins do not pump enough oxygen-poor blood back to the heart. This is caused by the valves in the veins leaking or flowing backwards. It usually occurs in the leg. It can be caused by the deep veins leaking [ less common ] or the superficial veins leaking[ more common]. Superficial venous insufficiency is the underlying cause of varicose and spider veins. ...Read more

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Does Venous insufficiency cause DVTS?

Dvt: DVT happens in veins where blood movement is sluggish or even minimal. Venous stasis predisposes to DVT. Particularly when leg muscles are not active. ...Read more

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What is a grade 3 venous insufficiency?

Venous reflux grades: Venous insufficiency grading is an older method of quantifying severity. Hach proposed 4 grades. Grade three describes saphenous vein reflux extending to or just below the knee. A grade four would be down to the foot level. ...Read more

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What is a grade 3 venous insufficiency?

What is a grade 3 venous insufficiency?

Grades of CVI: There is a classification of venous insufficiency called CEAP which grades venous insufficiency in 6 categories from 1 to 6 with 6 being the worse. 1 is spider veins, 2 is varicose veins, 3 is edema, 4 is skin changes, 5 is healed ankle ulcer and 6 is an active ulcer. There are treatments for each level. See a vein specialist. ...Read more

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What does grade 3 venous insufficiency mean?

Not sure: It is interesting that you receive that information. I am not aware of grade 3 venous insufficiency classification. Ther is a ceap classification. C3 corresponds to patients that have edema as a consequence of venous insufficiency, however gets a bit more complex when add the other components.
Would be better for the general publc to refers as mild/moderate/severe. ...Read more

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What kinds of doctors can treat venous insufficiency?

Vascular surgeon: Training provided to vascular surgeons to learn about the pathophysiology of the disease and the treatment options. ...Read more

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Difference between lymphadema and venous insufficiency?

Lymphedema: Balls of the issues lymphedema and venous insufficiency can cause swelling of the lower extremities. However with venous insufficiency there is very often a valve dysfunction causing the problem which can be corrected by destruction of the vein. In both cases use of a compression stocking during daily activities would be of benefit to help reduce or prevent the swelling. ...Read more

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What is chronic venous insufficiency? How do you get it?

What is chronic venous insufficiency? How do you get it?

Chronic venous insuf: Chronic venous insufficiency is due to the back flow of blood in the veins usually in the lower extremities. Back flow is usually protected by valves in the veins that become faulty over time allowing blood to pool. This increases the pressure of blood in the veins and fluid (and a small amount of blood) leaks into the tissues causing swelling, pain, inflammation, and on the skin ulcerations. ...Read more

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I was diagnosed with chronic venous insufficiency. What should I do to treat it?

See an expert: This is not a simple problem to answer here- some might say wear stockings, or get some treatment. This needs a diagnosis and then treatment. A surgeon who specializes in vein therapy is best to guide that therapy and answer. ...Read more

Dr. Ted King
502 Doctors shared insights

Venous Insufficiency (Definition)

A condition where the flow of blood through the veins is inadequate, causing blood to pool in the legs. It is most often caused by either blood ...Read more