Top
20
Doctor insights on: Are Patients With End Stage Renal Disease At Risk For Hyperkalemia

Share
1

1
What is the difference between chronic renal failure and end-stage renal disease?

What is the difference between chronic renal failure and end-stage renal disease?

Stages: Chronic kidney disease can be staged based on creatinine clearance in 5 stages. End stage usually designates stage 5 of chronic kidney disease. ...Read more

Dr. Brad Goldenberg
1 doctor shared a insight

Hyperkalemia (Definition)

Hyperkalemia in an elevated potassium level in the blood. It can be mild to severe. The most common causes are kidney disease, Addison's disease, dehydration, and multiple drug therapies. It can occur in crush injuries and rhabdomyolysis (rapid breakdown of muscle) or hemolysis (breakdown of blood cells). Severe hyperkalemia can be fatal and cause the heart to stop beating or become very slow. It is usually treated by resin exchange agents (Kayexalate or others) or dialysis and fluids. Sometimes glucose, Insulin and sodium bicarbonate can be utilized as ...Read more


2

2
Can you tell me diet for end stage renal disease patients?

Can you tell me diet for end stage renal disease patients?

Dialysis diet: The answer to your question is too long for this space. Go to this link and learn about a diet for dialysis patients: http://www.davita.com/kidney-disease/diet-andnutrition/diet-basics/the-hemodialysis-diet/e/5314. It is best to ask the dietician at a dialysis center what diet should be followed, as diabetic patients' diets are different from those that are not diabetic. Good luck. ...Read more

3

3
What kind of diet is good for end stage renal disease patients?

What kind of diet is good for end stage renal disease patients?

Dialysis diet: The answer to your question is too long for the space allotted here. Go to this link for the answer you are seeking: http://www.davita.com/kidney-disease/diet-andnutrition/diet-basics/the-hemodialysis-diet/e/5314 If the patient is already on dialysis, have the patient ask the dietician at the patient's dialysis for a diet to follow. ...Read more

4

4
Is it possible for a patient to die from end stage renal disease?

Is it possible for a patient to die from end stage renal disease?

It is possible: The kidneys filter blood, removing substances that are harmful to the body, and helping to maintain water and electrolyte balance. Depending on the severity of the kidney disease, some patients need dialysis or a kidney transplant to survive. ...Read more

6

6
Is fluid balance a cardiovascular problem for a patient with end stage renal disease?

Is fluid balance a cardiovascular problem for a patient with end stage renal disease?

Cardiorenal: Think of a pump (or the heart) building pressure against a filter that is very slow and inefficient, the kidneys in our case. For a while, the pump, which is elastic, will adjust by stretching trying to accommodate the extra load, fluid unfiltered by the kidneys. Once that capacity is reached the heart goes in failure, too. The extra fluid is managed with diuretics and eventually dialysis. ...Read more

8

8
Why is the production of erythropoeitin impaired in a patient with renal disease?

Why is the production of erythropoeitin impaired in a patient with renal disease?

Kidneys make it!: Erythropoietin is made by the kidneys. Diseased kidneys make less. Back in the 70's when i was in med school erythropoietin had not been isolated but its' existence was postulated based on the observation that renal patients tended to be anemic. ...Read more

9

9
Why is the manufacturing of erythropoeitin impaired in a patient with chronic renal disease?

Why is the manufacturing of erythropoeitin impaired in a patient with chronic renal disease?

Eruthropoietin: It is secreted by the kidneys, simply. When kidneys fail, all functions are reduced. Industrial production of erythrop works as good as the natural one. ...Read more

11

11
Is it possible to reverse chronic renal failure in a patient?

Is it possible to reverse chronic renal failure in a patient?

Renal failure: It is difficult to reverse renal failure, but with strict diet and blood pressure control the progression can be stabilized. Also staing well hydrated can help also. ...Read more

12

12
What would glucose levels be like in a non-diabetic patient having chronic renal failure?

What would glucose levels be like in a non-diabetic patient having chronic renal failure?

Normal: If a patient is not diabetic there blood sugar should be in the normal range. Even in if in chronic renal failure. If running high may be due to certain medications which might be used to treat some other condition. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
13

13
Can you tell me for a patient who has hyperphosphatemia and hypercalcemia, and also has chronic renal failure, what to do?

Can you tell me for a patient who has hyperphosphatemia and hypercalcemia, and also has chronic renal failure, what to do?

See the dietician!: Diet can be problematic in dialysis patients/chronic renal failure patients. Many foods contain phosphorus; diaysis patients often take phosphate binders to help them excrete this. Kidney patients must watch calories, protein, and salt also. My best advice is to have a consult with the dietician at your local kidney center. They can help with recipies and ideas to keep you healthier. ...Read more

14

14
What are the treatment options for a patient who has hyperphosphatemia, hypercalcemia, and chronic renal failure?

What are the treatment options for a patient who has hyperphosphatemia, hypercalcemia, and chronic renal failure?

Treatment: I am very surprised that your kidney doctor has not described this to you in detail. Either go back for more education or have your PC to refer you to a different specialist who should help you understand what is happening and what will develop. Hopefully for better! ...Read more

15

15
What could be the treatment options for a patient who has hyperphosphatemia and hypercalcemia, and also has chronic renal failure.?

What could be the treatment options for a patient who has hyperphosphatemia and hypercalcemia, and also has chronic renal failure.?

Phosphate: Hi. How bad is your creatinine/eGFR? You probably need a low phosphate diet, phosphate binders (e.g. sevelamer), and maybe dialysis. What is your PTH? Probably high. You might need a vitamin D analog (e.g., doxercalciferol or paricalcitol) or cinacalcet. Talk with your nephrologist! ...Read more

16

16
Why would a patient with diabetic ketoacidosis have hyperkalemia?

Why would a patient with diabetic ketoacidosis have hyperkalemia?

Lack of insulin: The lack of insulin, which is needed to transport k into the cells causes the k to remain in the intravascular space, is a primary cause of high levels of k in dka. Acidosis also has the effect of of allowing k to go from the cells to the intravascular space. The correction of DKA with Insulin allows k to go into the cells and corrects the acidosis present also lower plasma k levels, . ...Read more

17

17
Would renal failure result in hypo- or hyperkalemia? Why?

Would renal failure result in hypo- or hyperkalemia? Why?

Depends: Many factors contribute to serum potassium levels including residual kidney function, diuretic use, potassium intake, GI potassium loss (i.e. diarrhea), and acid/base status. It is possible to see high or low serum potassium levels in patients with renal failure but hyperkalemia (high potassium) is more commonly observed in patients with advanced renal dysfunction. ...Read more

18

18
Losartan alternative for kidney patient (creatinine 2.7) that will not result in hyperkalemia?

Losartan alternative for kidney patient (creatinine 2.7) that will not result in hyperkalemia?

No: Any medicine that inhibits the Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS) can reduce kidney handling of potassium. Losartan stops angiotensin effect in the kidney and may have less effect on potassium but remains a cause of hyperkalemia. Drugs that are "ACE inhibitors" or "ARB" agents can increase potassium. They can be used if a low potassium diet is followed and potassium levels are followed closely. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
20

20
With acute diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis caused by systemic lupus erythematosus, why would a patient have uremia and hyperkalemia?

With acute diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis caused by systemic lupus erythematosus, why would a patient have uremia and hyperkalemia?

SLE DPGN is bad.: The degree of remaining renal function dictates the inability of the kidney to excrete waste products and manage potassium levels. In any severe kidney disease when egfr approaches 15 ml/min uremia and elevated k+ levels are frequently noted. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer