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Doctor insights on: Are Brain Effects In Wilson Disease Reversible

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How can I treat wilson disease?

How can I treat wilson disease?

Don't self-treat: Usually an oral medicine to manage copper is all that's required. Be very wary of "alternative and complementary" remedies in this very serious illness, and discuss anything you may be using with your gastroenterologist. I'm going to assume you have real Wilson's and not the "pop" Wilson syndrome, which is not a real illness. Best wishes. ...Read more

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Dr. Robert Hutchman
84 doctors shared insights

Wilson's Disease (Definition)

Wilson's disease is a genetic disorder which causes copper to accumulates in body tissues & may cause psychiatric or neurological ...Read more


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How did wilson disease get its name?

How did wilson disease get its name?

Sam Wilson MD: 1878–1937, first described it and named it hepatolenticular degeneration. Perhaps the most treacherous diagnosis in general medicine, and unfortunately is still missed, which is bad because it's quite easy to manage and horrible if missed. There is also a bogus "wilson's disease" -- lay people are invited to self-diagnose as having subtle thyroid disease; no scientific basis. ...Read more

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What is wilson disease? What is the problem in the body?

What is wilson disease?  What is the problem in the body?

Mutated ATP7B: The cells can't transport copper out of their cytoplasm as they should. This cases the complications of liver cell death and cirrhosis, brain damage, and so forth. ...Read more

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Describe the treatments enzyme substitution in wilson disease?

Describe the treatments enzyme substitution in wilson disease?

Wilson disease: Excess opper accumulation with serious end organ damage. Treatment after diagnosis is chelation therapy to diseaseexcess copper. Then avoidance of reaccumulation. See mayo clini wilsons disease well written and presented for non medical personnel. ...Read more

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I have low ceruloplasmin on blood test, so what are the chances I have wilson disease?

I have low ceruloplasmin on blood test, so what are the chances I have wilson disease?

Need more workup: Low ceruloplasmin by itself is not diagnostic of wilson disease. Decreased ceruloplasmin and blood copper concentrations and increased urine copper levels may indicate wilson disease. Definitive diagnosis may require a liver biopsy. ...Read more

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My dr. Says I have high copper in my blood (serum copper). Could I have wilson disease? 

My dr. Says I have high copper in my blood (serum copper). Could I have wilson disease? 

Need tests: Most cases of wilson disease show symptoms between childhood and early adulthood, some may present in their 30's and 40's. Diagnosis is made by blood, urine tests and an eye examination for kayser-fleischer rings (copper deposit around the cornea). Liver biopsy and genetic tests are also options. Not all patients experience the same set of symptoms or timeline, so thorough testing is important. ...Read more

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What are the tests for wilson disease?

What are the tests for wilson disease?

It depends: Serum ceruloplasmin is often used and it is a poor choice as it misses about 30% of cases. Urine copper is my choice. If there's a family history or the diagnosis seems obvious, or urine copper is high, test the ATP7B gene. ...Read more

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At which age wilson disease excluded ???

No age criteria: this is a disease mainly diagnosed based on symptoms and lab results. There is no cutoff in terms of age ...Read more

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What are some of the other symptoms of wilson disease?

What are some of the other symptoms of wilson disease?

Wilson Disease: The main organs affected by copper accumulation are the liver and brain, so your symptoms are refer able to these organs. You may experience cognitive impairment, bradykinesia, parkinsonian-like motor symptoms, other motor and sensory problems, fatigue, esophageal varices, liver and kidney disease, and, of course, the copper colored rings in your eyes. Cardiac involvement can also intervene. ...Read more

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